Wood Lane, W12

Road in/near White City, existing between the 1700s and now

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  MAP  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.51107 -0.2248) 

Wood Lane, W12

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Road · White City · W12 ·
APRIL
7
2015

Wood Lane runs from Shepherd’s Bush to Wormwood Scrubs and lies wholly in London W12.

In the 1780s, Wood Lane was known as Turvens Lane after Turvens House located a short distance north of Shepherd's Bush Green. By the 1830s it had received its current name.

In the 1860s the railway arrived with a line running parallel with Wood Lane but the area was still rural in character with the buildings of Wood Lane Farm and Eynam Farm to the east of the road and a plant nursery to the west covering the land east of present day Frithville Gardens and south of the BBC Television centre.

The coming of the Twopenny Tube - the Central London Railway opening between Shepherd's Bush and Bank in 1900 saw the first industrial development as the company's new depot, repair shops and power station located onto a 20 acre site at Wood Lane. The depot was also served by a single track spur from the West London Railway which was used to bring coal to the power station.

In 1905 the French Chamber of Commerce proposed holding a Franco-British Exhibition in London to promote the industrial achievements of both countries. It was to be a very opulent affair housed in a spectacular setting, built on 140 acres of former farm land on the west side of Wood Lane.

The plan got the Royal seal of approval and work started in January 1907 with contractors working round the clock to complete the exhibition site within a year. The majority of exhibition buildings were constructed on an impressive scale and set amongst specially laid-out gardens and waterways. Most of the buildings featured highly ornamented plastered exteriors which were weather-proofed with white paint and the site quickly became known locally as the ‘White City’. The exhibition area also included a large stadium to accommodate 150,000 spectators and was built to host the 1908 Olympic Games.

The closest existing stations were Shepherds Bush on the Central London Railway and the adjacent Uxbridge Road on the West London Line. Both stations fronted onto Uxbridge Road and were nearly half a mile away from the exhibition site by road. To overcome this an exhibition entrance was built between the two stations from where a raised arcaded walkway incorporating exhibition halls was built 30' above railway owned land linking the two stations with the exhibition site.

Old cottages in Wood Lane, Shepherd's Bush, c. 1890.
Old cottages in Wood Lane, Shepherd's Bush, c. 1890. (click to enlarge)

It was soon clear that the walkway would not be adequate and in July 1907 the Central London Railway received parliamentary consent to extend northwards from its Shepherds Bush terminus to a new station at Wood Lane. The station was to be sited on a single-track loop in the northwest corner of their depot.

The area to the west of Wood Lane, north of the current Loftus Road stadium, south of Du Cane Road and east of Bloemfontein Road was laid out as the exhibition site. The numerous pavilions faced with white stone earned the exhibition the nickname "the White City" which subsequently remained with the area, even after the exhibition closed and its pavilions were demolished.

The 1908 Summer Olympics came to London. These games were originally scheduled to be held in Rome, but were re-located on financial grounds following a disastrous eruption of Mt Vesuvius in 1906.

White City Stadium (originally The Great Stadium) was then built on Wood Lane on the exhibition site for the 1908 Summer Olympics and is often seen as the precursor to the modern seated stadium and noted for hosting the finish of the first modern distance marathon. It also hosted greyhound racing, was briefly the QPR football club's home ground and also hosted speedway and a match at the 1966 World Cup, before the stadium was demolished in 1985. It was the first Olympic Stadium in the UK.

The BBC Television Centre on Wood Lane was the headquarters of BBC Television between 1960 and 2013. Officially opened on 29 June 1960, parts of the building are Grade II listed, including the central ring and Studio 1.

In the 2000s, the massive Westfield Centre was opened at the southern end of Wood Lane and a new underground station on the Hammersmith and City Line opened to serve it.




Main source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Further citations and sources



Platform signs from the first, disused Wood Lane station

Platform signs from the first, disused Wood Lane station
User unknown/public domain

NEARBY STREETS
Abdale Road, W12 Abdale Road is located near the ’Groves’ area of Shepherd’s Bush.
Ariel Way, W12 Ariel Way connects White City bus station with Shephard’s Bush.
Arminger Road, W12 Arminger Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Bard Road, W10 Bard Road lies in the area of London W10 near to Latimer Road station.
Batman Close, W12 Batman Close is a road in the W12 postcode area
Blechynden Street, W10 Blechynden Street is now a tiny street in the vicinity of Latimer Road station, W10
Bramley Mews, W10 Bramley Mews become part of a redelevopment of the area north of Latimer Road station in the 1960s.
Bramley Road, W10 Bramley Road is the street in which Latimer Road station is situated.
Bramley Road, W11 Bramley Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Canada Way, W12 Canada Way is a road in the W12 postcode area
Commonwealth Avenue, W12 Commonwealth Avenue is a road in the W12 postcode area
Depot Road, W12 Depot Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Dorando Close, W12 Dorando Close commemorates Dorando Pietri who finished first in the marathon of the 1908 London Olympics but was disqualified for receiving assistance.
East Mews, W10 East Mews was lost when the Westway was built. It lies partially under the modern Darfield Way.
Ellerslie Road, W12 Ellerslie Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Ethelden Road, W12 Ethelden Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Evesham Street, W11 Evesham Street is a street in Notting Hill.
Freston Road, W10 Freston Road is a street with quite a history.
Freston Road, W11 Freston Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Frithville Gardens, W12 Frithville Gardens is a road in the W12 postcode area
Hudson Close, W12 Hudson Close is a road in the W12 postcode area
Hunt Close, W11 Hunt Close is a street in Notting Hill.
Hurstway Street, W10 Hurstway Street ran from Barandon Street to Blechynden Street.
Hurstway Walk, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Ingersoll Road, W12 Ingersoll Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Lockton Street, W11 Lockton Street, just south of Latimer Road station is so insignificant that nary a soul know’s it’s there...
Loftus Road, W12 Loftus Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Macfarlane Place, W12 Macfarlane Place - a road with two lifetimes.
Mackenzie Close, W12 Mackenzie Close is a road in the W12 postcode area
Martin Street, W10 Martin Street disappeared as the Latimer Road area was redeveloped.
Mersey Street, W10 Mersey Street - now demolished - was once Manchester Street.
Nicholas Road, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Olaf Street, W11 Olaf Street is a street in Notting Hill.
Pring Street, W10 The unusually-named Pring Street was situated between Bard Road and Latimer Road.
Queensdale Crescent, W11 Queensdale Crescent is a street in Notting Hill.
Relay Road, W12 Relay Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Samuels Close, W6 Samuels Close is a road in the W6 postcode area
Shalfleet Drive, W10 Shalfleet Drive is a newer road in the Latimer Road area of W10
Silchester Terrace, W10 Silchester Terrace was lost to W10 in the 1960s.
Silver Road, W12 Silver Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
South Africa Road, W12 South Africa Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Stable Way, W10 Stable Way is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Stanlake Road, W12 Stanlake Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Station Walk, W10 Station Walk is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Station Walk, W11 Station Walk is a street in Notting Hill.
The Network, W12 The Network is a road in the W12 postcode area
Tunis Road, W12 Tunis Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Upper Road, W12 Upper Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Waynflete Square, W10 Waynflete Square is one of the newer roads in the vicinity of Latimer Road station.
West Cross Route, W11 The West Cross Route is a 1.21 km-long dual carriageway running north-south between the northern elevated roundabout junction with the western end of Westway (A40) and the southern Holland Park Roundabout.
Westfield Way, W12 Westfield Way is a road in the W12 postcode area
White City Close, W12 White City Close was designed as a compact series of two- to four-storey brown-brick terraces enclosing landscaped footways and courts.
White City Road, W12 White City Road is a road in the W12 postcode area


White City

White City was the place which defined the modern Marathon.

The area now called White City was level arable farmfields until 1908, when it was used as the site of the Franco-British Exhibition and the 1908 Summer Olympics. In 1909 the exhibition site hosted the Imperial International Exhibition and in 1910, the Japan-British Exhibition. The final two exhibitions to be held there were the Latin-British (1912) and the Anglo-American (1914), which was brought to a premature end by the outbreak of the First World War.

During this period it was known as the Great White City due to the white marble cladding used on the exhibition pavilions, and hence gave its name to this part of Shepherd's Bush.

The White City Stadium was demolished in 1985 to make way for the BBC White City building. Today, the 1908 Olympics are commemorated with a list of athletes inscribed on the side of the BBC Broadcast Centre Building, and the athletics finish line is marked in the paving outside the building.

The Marathon from these London Olympics played an important part in the development of the modern marathon race. In the early years of competitive international sport, the long distance marathon race did not have a standard set distance. The distance run at the first seven Olympics from 1896 to 1920 varied between 40km and 42.75 km. The starting point of the race at the 1908 Olympics was at Windsor Castle creating a distance of 26 miles 385 yards to the finishing line at White City stadium. In 1921 this was adopted as the standard distance.

To house the growing population of Shepherd's Bush, a five-storey housing estate was built in the late 1930s, which also took the name of the White City. Streets were named after countries that had featured in the exhibitions.

White City tune station was opened on 23 November 1947, replacing the earlier Wood Lane station. Its construction started after 1938 and had been scheduled for completion by 1940, but the Second World War delayed its opening for another seven years.

The architectural design of the station won an award at the Festival of Britain and a commemorative plaque recording this is attached to the building to the left of the main entrance.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Print-friendly version of this page