Goslett Yard, WC2H

Road in/near St Giles

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(51.51521 -0.1305) 

Goslett Yard, WC2H

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Road · St Giles · W1D ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Goslett Yard is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.




NEARBY STREETS
Adam and Eve Court, W1D The court was named for the nearby Adam and Eve tavern.
Adeline Place, WC1B Adeline Place was named after Adeline Marie Russell.
Archer Street, W1D Archer Street was Arch Street in 1675, Orchard Street in 1720 and Archer Street by 1746.
Bainbridge Street, WC1A Bainbridge Street is a road in the WC1A postcode area
Bainbridge Street, WC1B Bainbridge Street is a road in the WC1B postcode area
Barter Street, WC1A Barter Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Bateman Street, W1D Bateman Street was named for Sir James Bateman, local landowner and Lord Mayor of London in the 1670s.
Batemans Buildings, W1D Batemans Buildings is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Bayley Street, WC1B Bayley Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
Beak Street, W1F Beak Street is named after Thomas Beake, one of the Queen’s messengers.
Bedford Avenue, WC1B Bedford Avenue is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
Bedford Chambers, WC2E Bedford Chambers is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Bedford Square, WC1B Bedford Square was designed as a unified architectural composition in 1775-6 by Thomas Leverton.
Berners Mews, W1T Berners Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Berners Place, W1T Berners Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Berners Street, W1D Berners Street runs from the junction of Oxford Street and Wardour Street to join up with Mortimer Street and the former Middlesex Hospital.
Berners Street, W1T Berners Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Berwick Road, W1F Berwick Road is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Berwick Street, W1F Berwick Street commemorates the Duke of Berwick, an illegitimate son of James II.
Betterton Street, WC2H Betterton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Bloomsbury Place, WC1B Bloomsbury Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
Bloomsbury Square, WC1A The 4th Earl of Southampton was granted a building license for the construction of Bloomsbury Square in 1661.
Bloomsbury Street, WC1A Bloomsbury Street runs from Gower Street in the north to the junction of New Oxford Street and Shaftesbury Avenue in the south.
Bloomsbury Street, WC1B Bloomsbury Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1B postal area.
Bloomsbury Way, WC1A Bloomsbury Way is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Bourchier Street, W1D Bourchier Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Bow Street, WC2E Bow Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Brewer Street, W1D Brewer Street runs west to east from Glasshouse Street to Wardour Street.
Brewer Street, W1F Brewer Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Bridle Lane, W1F Bridle Lane is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Broadwick Street, W1F Broadwick Street runs west-east between Marshall Street and Wardour Street, crossing Berwick Street.
Bucknall Street, WC2H Bucknall Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Bury Place, WC1A Bury Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Cambridge Circus, WC2H Cambridge Circus is the intersection of Shaftesbury Avenue and Charing Cross Road.
Cape Yard, E1W A street within the W1D postcode
Carlisle Street, W1D Carlisle Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Carlisle Walk, E8 Carlisle Walk is a road in the E8 postcode area
Carriage Hall, WC2E Carriage Hall is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Central Arcade, WC2E Central Arcade is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Chapone Place, W1D Chapone Place is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Charing Cross Road, WC2H Charing Cross Road is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Charlotte Place, W1T Charlotte Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Ching Court, WC2H Ching Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Clare Market, WC2E This is a street in the WC2E postcode area
Coptic Street, WC1A Coptic Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Covent Garden Piazza, WC2E Covent Garden Piazza is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Covent Garden, WC2E Covent Garden, is the name of a district, but also the name of the central square which formerly hosted a fruit-and-vegetable market.
Covent Garden, WC2H Covent Garden is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Cranbourn Street, WC2H Cranbourne Street was named after local landowner the Earl of Salisbury, Viscount Cranbourn (Cranbourne) after the town in Dorset.
Dansey Place, W1D Dansey Place is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Darblay Street, W1F Darblay Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Dean Street, W1D Dean Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Denmark Place, WC2H Denmark Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Denmark Street, WC2H Denmark Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Dryden Street, WC2E Dryden Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Duck Lane, W1F Duck Lane is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Dudley Court, WC2H Dudley Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Dufours Place, W1F Dufours Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Dyott Street, WC1A Dyott Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Earlham Street, WC2H Earlham Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Earnshaw Street, WC2H Earnshaw Street was at first called Arthur Street.
East Street, TW8 East Street is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Eastcastle Street, W1T The portion of Eastcastle Street to the east of Wells Street originally belonged to the Berners Estate.
Endell Street, WC2H Endell Street, originally known as Belton Street, is a street that runs from High Holborn in the north to Long Acre and Bow Street in the south.
Evelyn Yard, W1T Evelyn Yard is a road in the W1T postcode area
Excel Court, WC2H Excel Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Falconberg Court, W1D Falconberg Court is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Falconberg Mews, W1D Falconberg Mews runs off of Sutton Row.
Flaxman Court, W1F Flaxman Court is a road in the W1F postcode area
Flichcroft Street, WC2H Flichcroft Street is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Flitcroft Street, WC2H Flitcroft Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Floral Street, WC2E Floral Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Frith Street, W1D Frith Street is named after Richard Frith, a local builder.
Galen Place, WC1A Galen Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Garrick Street, WC2E Garrick Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Gerrard Place, W1D Gerrard Place is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Gerrard Street, W1D Gerrard Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Gilbert Place, WC1A Gilbert Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Golden Square, W1F Golden Square is a historic Soho square, dating from the 1670s.
Goslett Yard, W1D Goslett Yard is a road in the W1D postcode area
Grape Street, WC2H Grape Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Great Chapel Street, W1F Great Chapel Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Great Marlborough Street, W1F Great Marlborough Street was named after John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough.
Great Newport Street, WC2H Great Newport Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Great Pulteney Street, W1F Great Pulteney Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Great Russell Street, WC1A Great Russell Street commemorates the marriage of the daughter of the 4th Earl of Southampton to William Russell in 1669.
Great Windmill Street, W1F Great Windmill Street has had a long association with music and entertainment, most notably the Windmill Theatre.
Greek Court, WC2H Greek Court is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Greek Street, W1D Greek Street leads south from Soho Square to Shaftesbury Avenue.
Greens Court, W1F Greens Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Gresse Street, W1T Gresse Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Hanover Place, WC2E Hanover Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Hanway Place, W1T Hanway Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Hanway Street, W1T Hanway Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
High Holborn, WC2A High Holborn is a road in the WC2A postcode area
High Holborn, WC2B High Holborn is a road which is the highest point in the City of London - 22 metres above sea level.
Hog Lane, WC2H Hog Lane was a lane that went from St Giles’ leper hospital (set up in the 12th century) to the monument to Eleanor at Charing Cross.
Holland Street, W1F Holland Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Hollen Street, W1F Hollen Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Hopkins Street, W1F Hopkins Street is a road in the W1F postcode area
Horse and Dolphin Yard, W1D Horse and Dolphin Yard is a road in the W1D postcode area
Ingestre Court, W1F Ingestre Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Ingestre Place, W1F Ingestre Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
James Street, WC2E James Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Jubilee Hall Jubilee Market, WC2E Jubilee Hall Jubilee Market is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Jubilee Market, WC2E Jubilee Market is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Kemp’s Court, W1F Kemp’s Court is situated in the heart of Berwick Street Market where a line of stalls stretch down both sides of the road.
King Street, WC2E King Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Langley Court, WC2E Langley Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Langley Street, WC2H Langley Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Lexington Street Cos, W1F Lexington Street Cos is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Lexington Street, W1F Lexington Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Lisle Street, WC2H Lisle Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Litchfield Street, WC2H Litchfield Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Little Newport Street, WC2H Little Newport Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Little Russel Street, WC1A Little Russel Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Little Russell Street, WC1A Little Russell Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Livonia Street, W1F Livonia Street was originally Bentinck Street, family name of owner the Duke of Portland.
Long Acre, WC2E Long Acre is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Lower James Street, W1F Lower James Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Lowndes Court, W1F Lowndes Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Macclesfield Street, W1D Macclesfield Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Macklin Street, WC2B Macklin Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Manette Street, W1D Manette Street in Soho is named after the character from Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities.
Marshall Street, W1F Marshall Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Marylebone Passage, W1W Marylebone Passage is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Meard Street, W1F John Meard, the younger was a carpenter, later a landowner, who developed the street.
Mercer Street, WC2H Mercer Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Monmouth Street, WC2H Monmouth Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Moor Street, W1D Moor Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Mortimer Street, W1T Mortimer Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Morwell Street, WC1B Morwell Street is a road in the WC1B postcode area
Museum Street, WC1A Museum Street is so-named since it approaches the main entrance of the British Museum.
Neal Street, WC2H Neal Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Neals Yard, WC2H Neals Yard is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
New Compton Street, WC2H New Compton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
New Oxford Street, WC1A New Oxford Street was built in 1840 to ease congestion in St Giles High Street.
New Oxford Street, WC2H New Oxford Street is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Newman Passage, W1T Newman Passage is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Newman Street, W1T Newman Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Newport Court, WC2H Newport Court was laid out approximately on the site of the courtyard of Newport House.
Newport Place, W1D Newport Place was named after Mountjoy Blount, Earl of Newport (Isle of Wight), who owned a house on Newport Street in the 17th century.
Noel Street, W1F Noel Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Nottingham Court, WC2H Nottingham Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Odhams Walk, WC2H Odhams Walk is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Old Compton Street, W1D Old Compton Street is a road that runs east–west through Soho.
Oxford Street, W1D This is a street in the W1D postcode area
Oxford Street, W1F This is a street in the W1F postcode area
Percy Street, W1T Percy Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Peter Street, W1F Peter Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Phoenix Street, WC2H Phoenix Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Pied Bull Court, WC1A Pied Bull Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Pied Bull Yard, WC1A Pied Bull Yard is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Poland Street, W1F Poland Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Portland Mews, W1F Portland Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Rathbone Place, W1T Rathbone Place honours Captain Rathbone who was the builder of the road and properties thereon from 1718 onwards.
Rathbone Street, W1T Rathbone Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Richmond Buildings, W1D Richmond Buildings is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Richmond Mews, W1D Richmond Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Romilly Street, W1D Romilly Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Rose Street, WC2E Rose Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Royalty Mews, W1D Royalty Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Russell Chambers, WC2E Russell Chambers is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Saint Giles High Street, WC2H This is a street in the WC2H postcode area
Saint Martin’s Court, WC2H Saint Martin’s Court is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Salt Yard, SW19 A street within the W1T postcode
Sandringham Court, W1F Sandringham Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Seven Dials Court, WC2H Seven Dials Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Shaftesbury Avenue, W1D Shaftesbury Avenue is a major street in the West End of London, named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury.
Shaftesbury Avenue, WC2H Shaftesbury Avenue was named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, Victorian politician and philanthropist.
Shelton Street, WC2B Shelton Street is a road in the WC2B postcode area
Shelton Street, WC2H Shelton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Sheraton Street, W1F Sheraton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Shorts Gardens, WC2H Shorts Gardens is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Silver Place, W1F Silver Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Slingsby Place, WC2E Slingsby Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Smiths Court, W1D Smiths Court is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Soho Square, W1D In its early years, Soho Square was one of the most fashionable places to live in London.
Soho Street, W1D Soho Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Sounding Alley, E3 Sounding Alley is a road in the E3 postcode area
St Anne’s Court, W1F St Anne’s Court is an alleyway that connects Dean Street and Wardour Street.
St Giles High Street, WC2H St Giles High Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Stacey Street, WC2H Stacey Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Stedham Place, WC1A Stedham Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Stephen Mews, W1T Stephen Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Stephen Street, W1T Stephen Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Streatham Street, WC1A Streatham Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
Stukeley Street, WC2B Stukeley Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2B postal area.
Sutton Row, W1D Sutton Row has existed since 1681.
The Market Piazza, WC2E The Market Piazza is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
The Market The Piazza, WC2E The Market The Piazza is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
The Market, WC2E The Market is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
The Piazza, WC2E The Piazza is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Thomas Neal Centre, WC2H Thomas Neal Centre is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Thomas Neal’s shopping centre, WC2H Thomas Neal’s shopping centre is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Tisbury Court, W1D Tisbury Court is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Tower Court, WC2H Tower Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Tower Street, WC2H Tower Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Upper James Street, W1F Upper James Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Upper John Street, W1F Upper John Street is a road in the W1F postcode area
Upper St Martin’s Lane, WC2H This is a street in the WC2H postcode area
Walker’s Court, W1D Walker’s Court is one of the many passageways which in past years was known as ’Paved Alley’.
Wardour Mews, W1F Wardour Mews is a cul-de-sac off of Portland Street.
Wardour Street, W1D The part of Wardour Street south of Shaftesbury Avenue runs through London’s Chinatown.
Wardour Street, W1F Wardour Street is a street that runs north from Leicester Square, through Chinatown, across Shaftesbury Avenue to Oxford Street.
Warwick Street, W1B Warwick Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Wedgewood Mews, W1D Wedgewood Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Wedgwood Mews, W1D Wedgwood Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Wells Mews, N11 A street within the W1T postcode
Wells Mews, W1T Wells Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Wells Street, W1D Wells Street - ’Welses Lane’ - is first recorded in 1692.
Wells Street, W1W Wells Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
West Central Street, WC1A West Central Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1A postal area.
West Street, WC2H West Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Western Mansions, EN5 A street within the W1F postcode
Willoughby Street, WC1B Willoughby Street was formerly known as both Vine Street and Wooburn Street.
Windmill Street, W1T Windmill Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Winnett Street, W1D Winnett Street is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Winsley Street, W1D Winsley Street is a road in the W1D postcode area


St Giles

St Giles is a district of London, at the southern tip of the London Borough of Camden.

There has been a church at St Giles since Saxon times, located beside a major highway. The hospital of St Giles, recorded c. 1120 as Hospitali Sancti Egidii extra Londonium was founded, together with a monastery and a chapel, by Queen Matilda, wife of Henry I. St Giles (c. 650 – c. 710) was the patron saint of lepers and the hospital was home to a leper colony, the site chosen for its surrounding fields and marshes separating contagion from nearby London.

A village grew up to cater to the brethren and patients. The crossroads which is now St Giles Circus, where Oxford Street, Charing Cross Road, Tottenham Court Road and New Oxford St meet, was the site of a gallows until the fifteenth century. Grape Street, in the heart of the St Giles district, runs beside the site of the hospital's vineyard.

The monastery was dissolved during the Reformation and a parish church created from the chapel. The hospital continued to care for lepers until the mid sixteenth century, when the disease abated and the hospital instead began to care for indigents. The parish was known as St Giles in the Fields and it is recorded in 1563 as Seynt Gyles in the Field.

The first post-Catholic parish church was built in 1631 and from the mid-seventeenth century church wardens note "a great influx of poor people into this parish".

The 1665 Great Plague started in St Giles and the first victims were buried in the St Giles churchyard. By September 1665, 8000 people were dying a week in London. By the end of the plague year there were 3216 listed plague deaths in St Giles parish, which had fewer than 2000 households. After the Restoration, the area was populated by Huguenot refugees who had fled persecution and established themselves as tradesmen and artisans, particularly in weaving and the silk trade.

The southern area of the parish, around present day Shaftesbury Avenue, was a wasteland named Cock and Pye Fields. Houses were not built there until 1666, after the Great Fire, and not fully developed until 1693, becoming known as Seven Dials. Thomas Neale built much of the area, giving his name to Neal Street and Neal's Yard. St Giles and Seven Dials became known for their astrologers and alchemists, an association which lasts to this day. The village of St Giles stood on the main road from Holborn to Tyburn, a place of local execution. Convicted criminals were often allowed, in tradition, to stop at St Giles en route to Tyburn for a final drink - a St Giles Bowl - before hanging.

The ancient parish of St Giles in the Fields formed part of the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. The parish of St George Bloomsbury was split off in 1731, but the parishes were combined for civil purposes in 1774 and used for the administration of the Poor Law after the Poor Law Amendment Act 1834.

As London grew in the 18th and 19th centuries, so did the parish's population, rising to 30 000 by 1831. The Rookery stood between the church and Great Russell Street, and Seven Dials near where Centre Point stands today, now home to the Centrepoint homeless charity. It was of one of the worst slums within Britain, a site of overcrowding and squalor, a semi-derelict warren. From Georgian affluence in the 18th century, the area declined rapidly, as houses were divided up, many families sharing a single room. Irish Catholic immigrants seeking to escape desperate poverty took up residence and the slum was nicknamed 'Little Ireland' or 'The Holy Land'. The expression "a St Giles cellar" passed into common parlance, describing the worst conditions of poverty. Open sewers often ran through rooms and cesspits were left untended. Residents complained to the Times in 1849 : "We live in muck and filth. We aint got no priviz, no dust bins, no drains, no water-splies, and no drain or suer in the hole place." The rookery was a maze of gin shops, prostitutes' hovels and secret alleyways that police had little of hope navigating. William Hogarth, Thomas Rowlandson and Gustav Dore, among others, have drawn the area, novelists Henry Fielding and Charles Dickens have written about it extensively. Peter Ackroyd writes "The Rookeries embodied the worst living conditions in all of London's history; this was the lowest point which human beings could reach".

From the 1830s to the 1870s plans were developed to demolish the slum as part of London wide clearances for improved transport routes, sanitation and the expansion of the railways. New Oxford Street was driven through the area to join the areas of Oxford Street and Holborn. The Rookery dwellers were not re-housed by the authorities. 5000 were evicted and many just moved into near by slums, such Devil's Acre and Church Lane making those more overcrowded still. The unchanging character of the area, failing investment schemes and inability to sell new properties ensured that plans for wholesale clearance were stymied until the end of the century.

Upon the creation of the Metropolitan Board of Works in 1855 the combined parishes became the St Giles District and were transferred to the County of London in 1889.

The local government of London was reorganised in 1900 and St Giles became part of the Metropolitan Borough of Holborn.

The Central London Railway opened Tottenham Court Tube Station, between the Church of St Giles in the Fields and St Giles Circus on 30 July 1900. Tottenham Court Road underwent improvements in the early 1930s to replace lifts with escalators.

In 2009, Transport for London began a major reconstruction of large parts of the station. Much of the St Giles area alongside St Giles High Street was cleared to make way for the new development including Crossrail expansion.

Since 1965. St Giles has been part of the London Borough of Camden.


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