Yarmouth Place, W1J

Road in/near Piccadilly Circus .

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(51.50549 -0.14656, 51.505 -0.146) 
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Road · Piccadilly Circus · W1J ·
FEBRUARY
25
2022
Yarmouth Place lies off Brick Street.





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Emma Seif   
Added: 25 Jan 2022 19:06 GMT   

Birth of the Bluestocking Society
In about 1750, Elizabeth Montagu began hosting literary breakfasts in her home at 23 (now 31) Hill Street. These are considered the first meetings of the Bluestocking society.

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Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 21 Feb 2023 11:39 GMT   

Error on 1800 map numbering for John Street
The 1800 map of Whitfield Street (17 zoom) has an error in the numbering shown on the map. The houses are numbered up the right hand side of John Street and Upper John Street to #47 and then are numbered down the left hand side until #81 BUT then continue from 52-61 instead of 82-91.

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TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:41 GMT   

Baker Street
Baker Street station opened on the Metropolitan Railway - the world’s first underground line.

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Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

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Ray Ashby   
Added: 14 Aug 2023 17:22 GMT   

Greengrocers in Enford street
Greengrocer under new ownership by Mr Stanley Ashby, married to Mrs Lily Ashby

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 30 Jan 2023 11:28 GMT   

The Beatles on a London rooftop
The Beatles’ rooftop concert took place on the rooftop of the Apple Corps building in London. It was their final public performance as a band and was unannounced, attracting a crowd of onlookers. The concert lasted for 42 minutes and included nine songs. The concert is remembered as a seminal moment in the history of rock music and remains one of the most famous rock performances of all time.

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Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

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Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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Lived here
Brian J MacIntyre   
Added: 8 Jan 2023 17:27 GMT   

Malcolm Davey at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square
My former partner, actor Malcolm Davey, lived at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square, for many years until his death. He was a wonderful human being and an even better friend. A somewhat underrated actor, but loved by many, including myself. I miss you terribly, Malcolm. Here’s to you and to History, our favourite subject.
Love Always - Brian J MacIntyre
Minnesota, USA

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Comment
Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   

Bessborough Place, SW1V
I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved London. The stucco houses were a feature and the backs of the houses enabled parents to see thier children playing.

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Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

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Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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Peter   
Added: 4 Dec 2023 07:05 GMT   

Gambia Street, SE1
Gambia Street was previously known as William Street.

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Comment
Eileen   
Added: 10 Nov 2023 09:42 GMT   

Brecknock Road Pleating Company
My great grandparents ran the Brecknock Road pleating Company around 1910 to 1920 and my Grandmother worked there as a pleater until she was 16. I should like to know more about this. I know they had a beautiful Victorian house in Islington as I have photos of it & of them in their garden.

Source: Family history

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Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2023 16:59 GMT   

061123
Why do Thames Water not collect the 15 . Three meter lengths of blue plastic fencing, and old pipes etc. They left here for the last TWO Years, these cause an obstruction,as they halfway lying in the road,as no footpath down this road, and the cars going and exiting the park are getting damaged, also the public are in Grave Danger when trying to avoid your rubbish and the danger of your fences.

Source: Squirrels Lane. Buckhurst Hill, Essex. IG9. I want some action ,now, not Excuses.MK.

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Christian   
Added: 31 Oct 2023 10:34 GMT   

Cornwall Road, W11
Photo shows William Richard Hoare’s chemist shop at 121 Cornwall Road.

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Vik   
Added: 30 Oct 2023 18:48 GMT   

Old pub sign from the Rising Sun
Hi I have no connection to the area except that for the last 30+ years we’ve had an old pub sign hanging on our kitchen wall from the Rising Sun, Stanwell, which I believe was / is on the Oaks Rd. Happy to upload a photo if anyone can tell me how or where to do that!

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Comment
Phillip Martin   
Added: 16 Oct 2023 06:25 GMT   

16 Ashburnham Road
On 15 October 1874 George Frederick Martin was born in 16 Ashburnham Road Greenwich to George Henry Martin, a painter, and Mary Martin, formerly Southern.

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Lived here
Christine Bithrey   
Added: 15 Oct 2023 15:20 GMT   

The Hollies (1860 - 1900)
I lived in Holly Park Estate from 1969 I was 8 years old when we moved in until I left to get married, my mother still lives there now 84. I am wondering if there was ever a cemetery within The Hollies? And if so where? Was it near to the Blythwood Road end or much nearer to the old Methodist Church which is still standing although rather old looking. We spent most of our childhood playing along the old dis-used railway that run directly along Blythwood Road and opposite Holly Park Estate - top end which is where we live/ed. We now walk my mothers dog there twice a day. An elderly gentleman once told me when I was a child that there used to be a cemetery but I am not sure if he was trying to scare us children! I only thought about this recently when walking past the old Methodist Church and seeing the flag stone in the side of the wall with the inscription of when it was built late 1880

If anyone has any answers please email me [email protected]

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Comment
Chris hutchison   
Added: 15 Oct 2023 03:04 GMT   

35 broadhurst gardens.
35 Broadhurst gardens was owned by famous opera singer Mr Herman “Simmy”Simberg. He had transformed it into a film and recording complex.
There was a film and animation studio on the ground floor. The recording facilities were on the next two floors.
I arrived in London from Australia in 1966 and worked in the studio as the tea boy and trainee recording engineer from Christmas 1966 for one year. The facility was leased by an American advertising company called Moreno Films. Mr Simbergs company Vox Humana used the studio for their own projects as well. I worked for both of them. I was so lucky. The manager was another wonderful gentleman called Jack Price who went on to create numerous songs for many famous singers of the day and also assisted the careers of Bob Marley and Jimmy Cliff. “Simmy” let me live in the bedsit,upper right hand window. Jack was also busy with projects with The Troggs,Bill Wyman,Peter Frampton. We did some great sessions with Manfred Mann and Alan Price. The Cream did some demos but that was before my time. We did lots of voice over work. Warren Mitchell and Ronnie Corbett were favourites. I went back in 1978 and “Simmy “ had removed all of the studio and it was now his home. His lounge room was still our studio in my minds eye!!


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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
25 Park Lane 25 Park Lane was the London residence of Sir Philip Sassoon.
An Omnibus Ride to Piccadilly Circus An Omnibus Ride to Piccadilly Circus, Mr Gladstone Travelling with Ordinary Passengers, 1885
Down Street Down Street, also known as Down Street (Mayfair), is a disused station on the London Underground, located in Mayfair.
Hyde Park Corner At the other end of Park Lane from Marble Arch, Hyde Park Corner has struck terror into many a learner driver.
InterContinental London InterContinental London Park Lane is a luxury 5-star hotel.
Londonderry House Londonderry House was an aristocratic townhouse situated on Park Lane.
Memorial Gates The Memorial Gates is a war memorial located at the Hyde Park Corner end of Constitution Hill.
RAF Bomber Command Memorial The Royal Air Force Bomber Command Memorial is a memorial commemorating the crews of RAF Bomber Command who embarked on missions during the Second World War.
Royal Aeronautical Society The Royal Aeronautical Society, also known as the RAeS, is a British-founded multidisciplinary professional institution dedicated to the global aerospace community.
Royal Air Force Club The Royal Air Force Club (often referred to as the RAF Club) is situated at 128 Piccadilly.
Royal Artillery Memorial The Royal Artillery Memorial is a stone memorial at Hyde Park Corner, dedicated to the First World War casualties of the Royal Regiment of Artillery.
Shepherd Market Shepherd Market was described by Arthur Bingham Walkley in 1925 as one of the oddest incongruities in London.
The Athenaeum Hotel The Athenaeum is a family-owned five-star hotel overlooking Green Park.
Wellington Arch Wellington Arch is located to the south of Hyde Park at the western corner of Green Park.

NEARBY STREETS
Achilles Way, W1K Achilles Way is named for the nearby Wellington as Achilles statue in Hyde Park.
Albany, W1B The Albany is an apartment complex in Piccadilly, established in 1802.
Albemarle Street, W1S Albemarle Street takes its name from the second Duke of Albermarle, son of General Monk.
Aldford House, W1K Aldford House is sited on South Audley Street.
Aldford Street, W1K Aldford Street is named after Aldford, a property on the Grosvenor family’s Cheshire estates.
Ancaster House, W1J Ancaster House is a block on Chesterfield Gardens.
Apsley House, W1J Apsley House can be found on Piccadilly.
Apsley Way, SW1X Apsley Way is the formal name for the pathway which runs under Wellington Arch.
Archibald Mews, W1J Archibald Mews was formerly John Court, after local landowner John, Lord Berkeley.
Arlington House, SW1A Arlington House is now part of an exclusive residential development.
Arlington Street, SW1A Arlington Street is named after Henry Bennet, 1st Earl of Arlington, 17th century statesman and local landowner.
Ashburton Place, W1J Ashburton Place connects Clarges Street and Bolton Street.
Audley Court, W1J Audley Court is a block on Hill Street.
Audley Square, W1K Audley Square is named after Hugh Audley.
Balfour Mews, W1K Balfour Mews is the southern extention of Balfour Place.
Balfour Place, W1K Balfour Place honours Eustace Balfour, surveyor for the Grosvenor estate from 1890 to 1910.
Belgravia House, W1K Belgravia House is located on South Audley Street.
Bennet Street, SW1A Bennet Street lies off St James’s Street.
Bennett House, SW1A Bennett House is located on Bennet Street.
Berkeley House, W1J Berkeley House is a block on Hay Hill.
Berkeley Street, W1J Berkeley Street runs from Piccadilly to Berkeley Square.
Blue Ball Yard, SW1A Blue Ball Yard is first mentioned in 1672 when its site was sold by King Charles II.
Bolton Street, W1J Bolton Street runs from Curzon Street in the north to Piccadilly in the south.
Brick Street, W1J Brick Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Bridgewater House, SW1A Bridgewater House is a block on Cleveland Row.
Burlington Arcade, SW1Y Burlington Arcade is a covered shopping arcade, 179 metres in length, that runs from Piccadilly to Burlington Gardens.
Bury Street, SW1A Bury Street runs north-to-south from Jermyn Street to King Street, crossing Ryder Street.
Carrington Street, W1J Carrington Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Catherine Wheel Yard, SW1A Catherine Wheel Yard is named after an inn that stood on this site until it burnt down in 1895.
Charles Street, W1J Charles Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Chesterfield Gardens, W1J Chesterfield Gardens is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Chesterfield House, W1J Chesterfield House is a block on Chesterfield Gardens.
Chesterfield Street, W1J Chesterfield Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Clarges Mews, W1J Clarges Mews is a mews at the top of Clarges Street.
Clarges Street, W1J Clarges Street runs north from Piccadilly.
Cleveland Row, SW1A Cleveland Row – after Cleveland House (now Bridgwater House), named for Barbara Palmer, 1st Duchess of Cleveland who lived there in the late 17th century.
Colette House, W1J Colette House is a block on Piccadilly.
Constitution Hill, SW1A Constitution Hill connects Buckingham Palace with Hyde Park Corner.
Curzon Square, W1K Curzon Square is a road in the W1K postcode area
Curzon Street, W1J Curzon Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Curzonfield House, W1J Curzonfield House is a building on Curzon Street.
Dartmouth House, W1J Dartmouth House is a block on Charles Street.
Deanery House, W1K Deanery House is a block on Deanery Street.
Deanery Street, W1K Deanery Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Derby Street, W1J Derby Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Devonshire House, W1J Devonshire House is a block on Piccadilly.
Dorchester Ride, W1K Dorchester Ride is a road in the W1K postcode area
Dover Street, W1J Dover Street is notable for its Georgian architecture as well as the location of historic London clubs and hotels.
Down Street Mews, W1J Down Street Mews is a largely hidden side street in Mayfair.
Down Street, W1J Down Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Dudley House, SW1A Dudley House is situated at 169 Piccadilly.
Duke of Wellington Place, SW1X Duke of Wellington Place is the official name for the road which skirts the central Hyde Park Corner island on the south and east sides.
Egyptian House, W1J Egyptian House is a block on Piccadilly.
Empire House, W1J Empire House is a block on Piccadilly.
Eon House, W1K Eon House is a block on Piccadilly.
Farm House, W1J Farm House is located on Farm Street.
Farm Street, W1J Farm Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Fitzmaurice Place, W1J Fitzmaurice Place is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Fountain House, W1K Fountain House is a block on Aldford Street.
French Railway House, SW1Y French Railway House occupies 178-180 Piccadilly.
French Railways House, W1J French Railways House is a building on Piccadilly.
Garrick House, W1J Residential block
Glendore House, W1J Glendore House is a block on Clarges Street.
Grosvenor Crescent Mews, SW1X Grosvenor Crescent Mews is a gated mews.
Half Moon Street, W1J Half Moon Street runs between Piccadilly and Curzon Street.
Hamilton Mews, W1J Hamilton Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Hamilton Place, W1J Hamilton Place lies just to the north of Hyde Park Corner.
Hay Hill, W1S Hay Hill is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Hay’s Mews, W1J This is a street in the W1J postcode area
Hertford Street, W1J Hertford Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Hill Street, W1J Hill Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Holforoad Way, W1J A street within the W1J postcode
Holforoad Way, W1J A street within the W1J postcode
Hyde Park Corner, W1J Hyde Park Corner is a major road junction at the southeastern corner of Hyde Park.
Landsdowne Row, W1J Landsdowne Row is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Lanesborough Place, SW1X Lanesborough Place is a small street serving The Lanesborough Hotel.
Lansdowne House, W1J Lansdowne House is a block on Berkeley Square.
Lansdowne Row, W1J Lansdowne Row is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Little St James’s Street, SW1A Little St James’s Street is a turning off of St James’s Street proper.
Lovers’ Walk, W1K Lovers’ Walk is a road in the W1K postcode area
Market Mews, W1J Market Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Mayfair Building, W1J Mayfair Building is sited on Farm Street.
Mayfair Place, W1J Mayfair Place runs behind Devonshire House.
Mayfayre House, W1J Mayfayre House is a block on Shepherd Street.
Meadows House, W1J Meadows House is a block on Queen Street.
Nightingale House, W1J Nightingale House is a block on Curzon Street.
Old Bond Street, W1J Old Bond Street was named for Sir Thomas Bond, a property developer from Peckham who laid out a number of streets in this part of the West End.
Old Park Lane, W1J Old Park Lane is a road in the W1J postcode area
OverSeas House, SW1A OverSeas House is a block on Park Place.
Park Place, SW1A Park Place is named after nearby Green Park.
Park Towers, W1J Park Towers is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Pembroke Close, SW1X Pembroke Close is a road in the SW1X postcode area
Piccadilly Arcade, SW1Y Piccadilly Arcade was named after Piccadilly Hall, home of local tailor Robert Baker in the 17th century.
Piccadilly, W1J Piccadilly is a major road in the West End.
Pitt’s Head Mews, W1K Pitt’s Head Mews is a road in the W1J postcode area
Queen Street, W1J Queen Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Red Lion Yard, W1J Red Lion Yard is a road in the W1K postcode area
Red Wolf House, W1J Red Wolf House is a block on Bolton Street.
Rex Place, W1K Rex Place is a road in the W1K postcode area
Royal Arcade, W1S Royal Arcade is an alleyway of exclusive shops.
Russell Court, SW1A Russell Court is named after the Russell family, who lived here in the 1600s.
Ryder Street, SW1A Ryder Street was named after Richard Rider, Master Carpenter to Charles II.
Ryger House, SW1A Ryger House is located on Arlington Street.
Savile House, W1J Savile House is a block on Berkeley Street.
Scandia House, W1S Scandia House is a building on Albemarle Street.
Shepherd Market, W1J Shepherd Market was developed between 1735 and 1746 by Edward Shepherd from an open area called Brook Field
Shepherd Street, W1J Shepherd Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
South Audley Street, W1K South Audley Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
South Street, W1K South Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Spencer House, SW1A Spencer House is a block on St James’s Place.
St James’s Place, SW1A St James’s Place runs west from St James’s Street.
St James’s Street, SW1A St James’s Street is a main road of the West End running from Pall Mall to Piccadilly.
Stafford House, W1S Stafford House is sited on Stafford Street.
Stafford Street, W1S Stafford Street is named after Margaret Stafford, partner of developer Sir Thomas Bond who built on this site in the seventeenth century.
Standbrook House, W1S Standbrook House is a block on Old Bond Street.
Stanhope Gate, W1K Stanhope Gate is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Stanhope House, W1K Stanhope House is sited on Park Lane.
Stanhope Row, W1J Stanhope Row is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Stratton House, W1J Stratton House is a block on Stratton Street.
Stratton Street, W1J Stratton Street forms an L shape between Piccadilly and Berkeley Street.
Swan House, W1S Swan House can be found on Old Bond Street.
The Bank Building, SW1A The Bank Building is located on St James’s Street.
The Economist Building, SW1A The Economist Building can be found on St James’s Street.
The Ritz Arcade, SW1A The Ritz Arcade lies outside The Ritz Hotel.
Tilney Street, W1K Tilney Street is a road in the W1K postcode area
Trebeck Street, W1J Trebeck Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Waverton Street, W1J Waverton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
White Horse Street, W1J White Horse Street runs from Piccadilly to Shepherd Street.

NEARBY PUBS
The Clarence The Clarence is located diagonally opposite the Ritz.
The Kings Head The Kings Head dates from 1710.


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Piccadilly Circus

Piccadilly Circus was built in 1819 to connect Regent Street with the major shopping street of Piccadilly.

The junction has been a very busy traffic interchange since construction, as it lies at the centre of Theatreland and handles exit traffic from Piccadilly, which Charles Dickens, Jr. described in 1879: "Piccadilly, the great thoroughfare leading from the Haymarket and Regent-street westward to Hyde Park-corner, is the nearest approach to the Parisian boulevard of which London can boast." The circus lost its circular form in 1886 with the construction of Shaftesbury Avenue.

Piccadilly Circus tube station was opened 10 March 1906, on the Bakerloo Line, and on the Piccadilly Line in December of that year. In 1928, the station was extensively rebuilt to handle an increase in traffic.

The intersection’s first electric advertisements appeared in 1910, and, from 1923, electric billboards were set up on the facade of the London Pavilion. Traffic lights were first installed on 3 August 1926, at the junction.

The Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain in Piccadilly Circus was erected in 1893 to commemorate the philanthropic works of Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury. During the Second World War, the statue atop the Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain was removed and was replaced by advertising hoardings. It was returned in 1948. When the Circus underwent reconstruction work in the late 1980s, the entire fountain was moved from the centre of the junction at the beginning of Shaftesbury Avenue to its present position at the southwestern corner.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Get Back
Credit: Stable Diffusion
TUM image id: 1675076090
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The 52 bus
TUM image id: 1556876554
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The Wellington Statue on the Arch in the 1850s
Credit: Unknown
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Exterior of the memorial in 2013.
Credit: Tim Rademacher
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Marie Antoinette Suite at the Ritz Hotel, Piccadilly (1914)
Credit: Architectural Record Company, New York
Licence: CC BY 2.0


A Friday Evening Discourse at the Royal Institution; Sir James Dewar on Liquid Hydrogen (1904)
Credit: Henry Jamyn Brooks
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Wellington Arch photographed on 10 January 2017. Wellington Arch was built as an original entrance to Buckingham Palace, later becoming a victory arch proclaiming Wellington’s defeat of Napoleon. Crowned by the largest bronze sculpture in Europe, it depicts the Angel of Peace descending on the ’Quadriga’ - or four-horsed chariot - of War. The pathway that runs underneath the arch has a formal name - Apsley Way.
Credit: The Underground Map
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Belgrave Square - this was classed in contemporary reports as "Thomas Cubitt’s greatest achievement". Belgrave Square, is the grandest and largest of his squares.
Credit: Thomas Shepherd
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Letter to Chuck Berry from Carl Sagan (1986)
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Hedonism Wines, Davies Street (2022)
Credit: Simon Gunzinger
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41 and 42 Dover Street, Mayfair (2022)
Credit: Wiki Commons/No Swan So Fine
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Hyde Park Corner in 1842, looking east towards Piccadilly. The entrance to Hyde Park through Decimus Burton’s Ionic Screen is on the left, and behind it, in darker stone, is Apsley House.
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