Western Arms

Pub in/near Kensal Town, existed between the 1880s and 2013

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(51.52622 -0.21479, 51.526 -0.214) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Pub · * · W10 ·
APRIL
25
2015

The Western Arms was a pub situated on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Kensal Road.

To locals, it was generally known as the "Souse" after the landlady Mrs South who took over around 1943.

It originally had a public bar, saloon bar and a smokers’ bar around the corner in an alleyway (which also led to the gents’ toilets). The smokers bar also had a nickname: "The Iron Lung".

Before changes in local licensing laws after the Second World War, it was notable in the past for being the last pub in Kensington where pubs shut at 10.30pm during the week. North of here, the Harrow Road area lay in the Borough of Paddington, whose pubs shut at 11pm, causing a sudden exodus of customers from the ’Western’.

The nearby gas works supplied gas to the local area by means of an underground pipe system. One of the main pipes ran just adjacent to the beer cellar of the Western and cooled the beer stored there. The pub was formerly reknowned, because of this, for the quality of its ale (probably due to the cooling effect of this gas pipe).

The pub lasted through to the end of the first decade of the twenty first century before becoming a restaurant.




Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence



CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Joan Clarke   
Added: 2 Feb 2021 10:54 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My late aunt Ivy Clarke (nee Burridge) lived with her whole family at 19 Avondale Park Gardens, according to the 1911 census and she was still there in 1937.What was it like in those days, I wonder, if the housing was only built in 1920?


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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:48 GMT   

Mary Place Workhouse
There was a lady called Ivy who lived in the corner she use to come out an tell us kids off for climbing over the fence to play football on the green. Those were the days.

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charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

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Dave Fahey   
Added: 6 Jan 2021 02:40 GMT   

Bombing of the Jack O Newberry
My maternal grandfather, Archie Greatorex, was the licensee of the Earl of Warwick during the Second World War. My late mother Vera often told the story of the bombing of the Jack. The morning after the pub was bombed, the landlord’s son appeared at the Warwick with the pub’s till on an old pram; he asked my grandfather to pay the money into the bank for him. The poor soul was obviously in shock. The previous night, his parents had taken their baby down to the pub cellar to shelter from the air raids. The son, my mother never knew his name, opted to stay in his bedroom at the top of the building. He was the only survivor. I often wondered what became of him.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 24 Nov 2020 14:25 GMT   

The 1879 Agricultural Show
The 1879 Royal Agricultural Society of England’s annual show was held on an area which later became Queen’s Park and opened on 30 June 1879.

The show ran for a week but the poor weather meant people had to struggle through deep mud and attendances fell disastrously. The visit to the show by Queen Victoria on the fifth day rallied visitors and nearly half the people who visited the show went on that day.

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Comment
GRaleigh   
Added: 23 Feb 2021 09:34 GMT   

Found a bug
Hi all! Thank you for your excellent site. I found an overlay bug on the junction of Glengall Road, NW6 and Hazelmere Road, NW6 on the 1950 map only. It appears when one zooms in at this junction and only on the zoom.

Cheers,
Geoff Raleigh

Source: Glengall Road, NW6

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The Underground Map   
Added: 25 Feb 2021 13:11 GMT   

Glengall Road, NW6
Thanks Geoff!

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Lived here
Brenda Jackson   
Added: 13 Aug 2017 21:39 GMT   

83 Pembroke Road
My Gt Gt grandparents lived at 83 Pembroke Road before it became Granville Road, They were married in 1874, John Tarrant and Maryann Tarrant nee Williamson.

Her brother George Samuel Williamson lived at 95 Pembroke Road with his wife Emily and children in the 1881 Census

Apparently the extended family also lived for many years in Alpha Place, Canterbury Road, Peel Road,

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 28 Dec 2020 08:31 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
I was born in Hammersmith Hospital (Ducane Rd) I lived at 40 Blecynden Street from birth in 1942 to 1967 when I moved due to oncoming demolition for the West way flyover.
A bomb fell locally during the war and cracked one of our windows, that crack was still there the day I left.
It was a great street to have grown up in I have very fond memories of living there.



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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:30 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Went to school St Johns with someone named Barry Green who lived in that St. Use to wait for him on the corner take a slow walk an end up being late most days.

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 8 Jun 2021 08:08 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Lived here #40 1942-1967

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Comment
Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:17 GMT   

Hewer Street W10
John Nodes Undertakers Hewer Street W10

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Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:27 GMT   

Hewer Street, W10
My husband Barry Newton lived over John Nodes in Hewer Street in 1950’s. Barry dad Tom worked for John Nodes and raced pigeons in his spare time Tom and his Lena raised 5 sons there before moving to the Southcoast in the mid 70’s due to Tom ill health

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Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:13 GMT   

St Jude’s Church, Lancefield Street
Saint Jude’s was constructed in 1878, while the parish was assigned in 1879 from the parish of Saint John, Kensal Green (P87/JNE2). The parish was united with the parishes of Saint Luke (P87/LUK1) and Saint Simon (P87/SIM) in 1952. The church was used as a chapel of ease for a few years, but in 1959 it was closed and later demolished.

The church is visible on the 1900 map for the street on the right hand side above the junction with Mozart Street.

Source: SAINT JUDE, KENSAL GREEN: LANCEFIELD STREET, WESTMINSTER | Londo

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Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:08 GMT   

Wedding at St Jude’s Church
On 9th November 1884 Charles Selby and Johanna Hanlon got married in St Jude’s Church on Lancefield Street. They lived together close by at 103 Lancefield Street.
Charles was a Lather, so worked in construction. He was only 21 but was already a widower.
Johanna is not shown as having a profession but this is common in the records and elsewhere she is shown as being an Ironer or a Laundress. It is possible that she worked at the large laundry shown at the top of Lancefield Road on the 1900 map. She was also 21. She was not literate as her signature on the record is a cross.
The ceremony was carried out by William Hugh Wood and was witnessed by Charles H Hudson and Caroline Hudson.

Source: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/1623/images/31280_197456-00100?pId=6694792

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 8 Jun 2021 08:08 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Lived here #40 1942-1967

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Comment
Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:17 GMT   

Hewer Street W10
John Nodes Undertakers Hewer Street W10

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Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

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Comment
   
Added: 2 Jun 2021 16:58 GMT   

Parachute bomb 1941
Charles Thomas Bailey of 82 Morley Road was killed by the parachute bomb March 1941

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Added: 1 Jun 2021 12:41 GMT   

Abbeville Road (1940 street directory)
North west side
1A Clarke A S Ltd, motor engineers
15 Plumbers, Glaziers & Domestic Engineers Union
25 Dixey Edward, florist
27 Vicary Miss Doris J, newsagent
29 Stenning John Andrew, dining rooms
31 Clarke & Williams, builders
33 Hill Mrs Theodora, confectioner
35 Golding W & sons, corn dealers
... here is Shandon road ...
37 Pennington Mrs Eliz Harvie, wine & spirit merchant
39 Westminster Catering Co Ltd, ham, beef & tongue dealers
41 Masters A (Clapham) Ltd, butchers
43 Thomas Euan Ltd, grocers
45 Garrett C T & Co Ltd, undertakers
47 Mayle T & Sons, fishmongers
49 Mayles Ltd, fruiterers
51 & 73 Hardy Arthur Sydney, draper
53 United Dairies (London) Ltd
... here is Narbonne avenue ...
55 Norris William Lennox, baker
57 Silver Star Laundry Ltd
59 Thorp John, oilman
61 Bidgood Leonard George, boot makers
63 Wilkie Rt Miln, chemist
65 Gander George Albert Isaac, hairdresser
67 Harris Alfred William, greengrocer
69 & 71 Lambert Ernest & Son Ltd, grocers
... here is Hambolt road ...
73 & 51 Hardy Arthur Sydney, draper
75 Cambourn Frederick, butcher
77 Siggers Clement, chemist
77 Post, Money Order, Telephone Call & Telegraph Office & Savings Bank
79 Hemmings William, baker
... here is Elms road ...
85 Cornish Joseph
91 Bedding Mrs
151 Johnson Mrs H K
157 Robinson Albert Ernest, grainer
173 Yardleys London & Provincial Stores Ltd, wine & spirit merchants
175 Clark Alfred, butcher
175A Morley Douglas Frederick, confectioner
... here is Crescent lane ...
... her is St Alphonsus road ...

South east side
... here is Trouville road ...
4 Bossy Miss, private school
... here are Bonneville gardens ...
24 Osborn Charles Edward, ladies hairdresser
24 Hall H Ltd, builders
24A Walton Lodge Laundry Ltd
... here are Shandon road & Abbeville mansions ...
28 Copley Fred Smith, chemist
30 Finch H G Ltd, laundry
32 Carter William Alfred, furniture dealer
34 Spriggs Charles & Co, wireless supplies dealer
36 Miles Frederick William, confectioner
38 Pitman Frederick, hairdresser
40 Rowe Frederick F, valeting service
42 Modridge Edward J, oilman
... here is Narbonne avenue ...
44 Southorn Albert, butcher
46 Brown Ernest, fruiterer
48 Stanley Mrs A A, confectioner
50 Fryatt Owen, delixatessen store
52 Benbrooks, domestic stores
54 Davis William Clifford, boot repairer
56 Blogg Alfred, newsagent
58 Rowlands Thomas & Sons, dairy
... here are Hambalt, Elms, Franconia, Caldervale & Leppoc roads ...
124 Clarke Frederick, decorator
... here are Crescent lane, Briarwood road & Park hill ...

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Comment
Boo Horton    
Added: 31 May 2021 13:39 GMT   

Angel & Trumpet, Stepney Green
The Angel & Trumpet Public House in Stepney Green was run by my ancestors in the 1930’s. Unfortunately, it was a victim on WWII and was badly damaged and subsequently demolished. I have one photograph that I believe to bethe pub, but it doesn’t show much more that my Great Aunt cleaning the steps.

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Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
29 Rackham Street, W10 29 Rackham Street lay about halfway along on the north side of the street.
6 East Row, W10 6 East Row was a house along East Row which was demolished in 1960 as part of slum clearance in the area.
Adair Road before redevelopment A photo showing Adair Road’s junction with Golborne Gardens in March 1964.
Admiral Blake (The Cowshed) The Admiral Blake was situated at the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Barlby Road.
Barlby Primary School Barlby Road Primary School has long served the children of North Kensington.
Clayton Arms A pub which was situated halfway down West Row in Kensal Town.
Corner of Rackham Street, Ladbroke Grove (1950) The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them.
Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance is the traditional starting point for the Notting Hill Carnival.
Gas Light and Coke Company The gasometers of the Gas Light and Coke company dominated North Kensington until demolition in the late 20th century.
Hudson’s the chemist (1906) Hudson's, a chemist shop, stood on the corner of Ilbert Street and Third Avenue in the Queen's Park estate.
Jack of Newbury The Jack of Newbury stood at the corner of East Row and Kensal Road until it was bombed on 2 October 1940.
Kensal House There are two Kensal Houses in London W10 - this was the original
Ladbroke Grove Ladbroke Grove on the corner of St Charles Sqaure taken outside the Eagle public house, looking north, just prior to the outbreak of the Second World War.
Ladbroke Grove looking north (1900) This early 1900s image was taken just south of the junction of Ladbroke Grove and Treverton Street.
Ladbroke Grove railway bridge Looking north over Bartle Bridge in the 1950s
Lads of the Village One of the signature public houses along Kensal Road.
Middle Row School Middle Row School was established in the late 19th century to provide education to the children of Kensal New Town.
Portobello Arms The Portobello Arms was a former pub in Kensal Town, established in 1842.
Queen’s Park Library Queen’s Park Library was built to improve the minds of the new Queen’s Park Estate residents.
Rackham Street, eastern end (1950) The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them.
St Martins Mission Saint Martin's Mission was originally known as Rackham Hall as it was situated on Rackham Street.
St Quintin Park Cricket Ground (1890s) Before the turn of the 20th century, west of present day North Kensington lay fields - the future Barlby Road was the site of the St Quintin Park Cricket Ground.
The Flora The Flora is situated on Harrow Road, W10.
The Foresters The Foresters - a lost pub of London W10
The Mitre The Mitre was situated at 62 Golborne Road.
The Plough From the sixteenth century onwards, the Plough stood beside the Harrow Road.
The Victoria (Narrow Boat) The Victoria later became the Narrow Boat before it burned down.
Wedlake Street Baths In a time when most had somewhere to live but few had somewhere to wash at home, public baths were the place to go...
Western Arms The Western Arms was a pub situated on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Kensal Road.
William Miller’s Yard William Miller's Yard stood in Chapel Place, West Row.

NEARBY STREETS
Absalom Road, W10 Absalom Road was the former name for the western section of Golborne Gardens.
Adair Road, W10 Adair Road is a street on the Kensal Town/North Kensington borders.
Adair Tower, W10 Adair Tower is a post-war tower block on the corner of Adair Road and Appleford Road, W10.
Adela Street, W10 Adela Street is a small cul-de-sac in Kensal Town.
Admiral Mews, W10 Admiral Mews is a small road off Barlby Road, W10.
Alderson Street, W10 Alderson Street is a side street north of Kensal Road.
Appleford House, W10 Appleford House is a residential block along Appleford Road.
Appleford Road, W10 Appleford Road was transformed post-war from a Victorian street to one dominated by housing blocks.
Athlone Place, W10 Athlone Place runs between Faraday Road and Bonchurch Road.
Barlby Gardens, W10 Barlby Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Barlby Road, W10 Barlby Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Bayford Road, NW10 Bayford Road is a street in Willesden.
Berens Road, NW10 Berens Road is a location in London.
Bosworth Road, W10 Bosworth Road was the first street built as Kensal New Town started to expand to the east.
Bransford Street, W10 Bransford Street became Porlock Street before vanishing altogether.
Branstone Street, W10 Branstone Street, originally Bramston Street, disappeared in 1960s developments.
Briar Walk, W10 Briar Walk lies on the Queen's Park Estate
Bruce Close, W10 Bruce Close replaced the earlier Rackham Street in this part of W10.
Buller Road, W10 Buller Road is a small residential road on the west side of Kilburn Lane.
Canal Close, W10 Canal Close is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Canal Way, W10 Canal Way was built on the site of the Kensal Gas Works.
Conlan Street, W10 Conlan Street is one of the newer roads of Kensal Town.
Droop Street, W10 Droop Street is one of the main east-west streets of the Queen’s Park Estate.
East Row, W10 East Row is a road with a long history within Kensal Town.
Enbrook Street, W10 Enbrook Street is another street north of Harrow Road, W10 without a pub.
Exmoor Street, W10 Exmoor Street runs from Barlby Road to St Charles Square, W10
Farrant Street, W10 Farrant Street is the missing link in the alphabetti spaghetti of the streetnames of the Queen’s Park Estate
Fifth Avenue, W10 Fifth Avenue is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Fourth Avenue, W10 Shalfleet Drive is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Galton Street, W10 Galton Street lies within the Queen’s Park Estate, W10.
Golborne Gardens, W10 Golborne Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Harrow Road, NW10 Harrow Road is a location in London.
Harrow Road, W10 Harrow Road is a main road through London W10.
Hawthorn Walk, W10 Queen's Park Estate
Hazlewood Crescent, W10 Hazlewood Crescent, much altered by 1970s redevelopment, is an original road of the area.
Heather Walk, W10 Heather Walk lies in the Queen’s Park Estate
Hewer Street, W10 Built as part of the St Charles’ estate in the 1870s, it originally between Exmoor Street to a former street called Raymede Street.
Humber Drive, W10 Humber Drive is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Huxley Street, W10 Huxley Street is the only street beginning with an H on the Queen’s Park Estate.
Ilbert Street, W10 Ilbert Street is the ’I’ street on the Queen’s Park Estate, W10
James House, W10 James House is a residential block in Appleford Road.
Kensal House, W10 Kensal House (1936), was designed to show off the power of gas and originally had no electricity at all.
Kensal Road, W10 Kensal Road, originally called Albert Road, is the heart of Kensal Town.
Kilravock Street, W10 Kilravock Street is a street on the Queen’s Park Estate, London W10
Lavie Mews, W10 Lavie Mews, W10 was a mews connecting Portobello Road and Murchison Road.
Lionel Mews, W10 Lionel Mews was built around 1882 and probably disappeared in the 1970s.
Lothrop Street, W10 Lothrop Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Manchester Drive, W10 Manchester Drive is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Maple Walk, W10 Post war development on the Queen’s Park Estate created some plant-based street names.
Matthew Close, W10 Matthew Close is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Maxilla Walk, W10 Maxilla Walk is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Methwold Road, W10 Methwold Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Middle Row, W10 Middle Row is one of the original streets laid out as Kensal New Town.
Murchison Road, W10 Murchison Road existed for just under 100 years.
Octavia House, W10 Octavia House on Southern Row was built in the late 1930s.
Parry Road, W10 Parry Road is on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Peach Road, W10 Paach Road is one of the newer streets of the Queen’s Park Estate in London W10
Pember Road, NW10 Pember Road is one of the side streets to the west of Kilburn Lane, NW10
Rackham Street, W10 Rackham Street is a road that disappeared from the streetscape of London W10 in 1951.
Rainham Road, NW10 Rainham Road, in Kensal Green, was laid out in 1895.
Raymede Street, W10 Raymede Street, after severe bomb damage in the area, disappeared after 1950.
Regent Street, NW10 Regent Street, otherwise an obscure side street is one of the oldest roads in Kensal Green.
Rendle Street, W10 Rendle Street ran from Murchison Road to Telford Road.
Ronan Walk, W10 Ronan Walk was one of the streets constructed in a 1970s build parallel to the Harrow Road.
Rootes Drive, W10 Rootes Drive is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Salters Road, W10 Salters Road lies on the site of an old playground.
Second Avenue, W10 Second Avenue is one of the streets of the Queen's Park Estate, W10
Shrewsbury Street, W10 Shrewsbury Street is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Sixth Avenue, W10 Sixth Avenue is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Southam House, W10 Southam House is situated on Adair Road.
Southam Street, W10 Southam Street was made world-famous in the photographs of Roger Mayne.
Southern Row, W10 Southern Row was originally South Row to match the other streets in the neighbourhood.
St Johns Terrace, W10 St Johns Terrace is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Sunbeam Crescent, W10 Sunbeam Crescent is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Sycamore Walk, W10 Queen's Park Estate
The Quadrant, W10 The Quadrant is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Third Avenue, W10 Third Avenue is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Treverton Street, W10 Treverton Street, a street which survived post war redevelopment.
Warfield Road, NW10 Warfield Road is a street in Willesden.
Wedlake Street, W10 Wedlake Street arrived as the second wave of building in Kensal Town was completed.
Wellington Road, NW10 Wellington Road commemorates the Duke of Wellington.
West Row, W10 West Row, W10 began its life in the early 1840s.
Western Dwellings, W10 Western Dwellings were a row of houses, opposite the Western Gas Works, housing some of the workers.
Wornington Road, W10 Wornington Road connected Golborne Road with Ladbroke Grove, though the Ladbroke end is now closed to through traffic.

NEARBY PUBS
Admiral Blake (The Cowshed) The Admiral Blake was situated at the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Barlby Road.
Albion The Albion stopped being a pub early.
Chilled Eskimo This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Clayton Arms A pub which was situated halfway down West Row in Kensal Town.
Earl of Warwick The Earl of Warwick stood at 36 Golborne Road.
Jack of Newbury The Jack of Newbury stood at the corner of East Row and Kensal Road until it was bombed on 2 October 1940.
Kensal Community Centre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lads of the Village One of the signature public houses along Kensal Road.
Parlour This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Portobello Arms The Portobello Arms was a former pub in Kensal Town, established in 1842.
The Earl Derby The Earl Derby stood on the corner of Southern Row and Bosworth Road.
The Flora The Flora is situated on Harrow Road, W10.
The Foresters The Foresters - a lost pub of London W10
The Mitre The Mitre was situated at 62 Golborne Road.
The Paradise This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Plough From the sixteenth century onwards, the Plough stood beside the Harrow Road.
The Prince of Wales A pub in Kensal Town
The Victoria (Narrow Boat) The Victoria later became the Narrow Boat before it burned down.
William IV This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Coronation street party, 1953.
TUM image id: 1545250697
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Ladbroke Grove (1866)
TUM image id: 1513618275
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Clayton Arms
TUM image id: 1453029104
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Foresters
TUM image id: 1453071112
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Lads of the Village pub
TUM image id: 1556874496
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Prince of Wales
TUM image id: 1556874951
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Admiral Blake (The Cowshed)
TUM image id: 1556888887
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Kensington Park Hotel
TUM image id: 1453375720
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Albion, now in residential use.
TUM image id: 1556404154
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Saint John the Evangelist
TUM image id: 1453377588
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Coronation street party, 1953.
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Ladbroke Grove (1866)
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Clayton Arms
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The Earl Derby stood on the corner of Southern Row and Bosworth Road. The Earl Derby himself was Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby who fought at the battle of Bosworth.
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The Foresters
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The Lads of the Village pub
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The Prince of Wales
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Admiral Blake (The Cowshed)
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Photographed just after the Second World War, this is the bombed-out Rackham Street, London W10 looking down from the junction with Exmoor Street.
Credit: Kensington and Chelsea library
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Middle Row School was constructed to provide education for the children of Kensal New Town. In 1877, an application was made to the Chelsea Vestry "to build a School House and premises. to be known as Middle Row Schools. Kensal Road by Messrs. Hook & Oldrey, builders..." The official opening took place on 19 August 1878.
Credit: Wiki Commons
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