Hyde House, NW9

Block in/near Colindale

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(51.58488 -0.24809, 51.584 -0.248) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Block · Colindale · NW9 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Residential block





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Martina   
Added: 13 Jul 2017 21:22 GMT   

Schweppes factory
The site is now a car shop and Angels Fancy Dress shop and various bread factories are there.

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

Reply
Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

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Comment
Matthew Moggridge ([email protected])   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 10:38 GMT   

Lord Chatham’s Ride (does it even exist?)
Just to say that I cycled from my home in Sanderstead to Knockholt Pound at the weekend hoping to ride Lord Chatham’s Ride, but could I find it? No. I rode up Chevening Lane, just past the Three Horseshoes pub and when I reached the end of the road there was a gate and a sign reading "Private, No Entry". I assumed this was the back entrance to Chevening House, country retreat of the Foreign Secretary, and that Lord Chatham’s Ride was inside the grounds. At least that’s what I’m assuming as I ended up following a footpath that led me into some woods with loads of rooted pathways, all very annoying. Does Lord Chatham’s Ride exist and if so, can I ride it, or is it within the grounds of Chevening House and, therefore, out of bounds? Here’s an account of my weekend ride with images, see URL below.

Source: No Visible Lycra: Lord Chatham’s ride: a big disappointmen

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Comment
norma brown   
Added: 20 Aug 2021 21:12 GMT   

my grandparents lived there as well as 2 further generations
my home

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Comment
Ruth   
Added: 6 Aug 2021 13:31 GMT   

Cheltenham Road, SE15
Harris Girls’ Academy, in Homestall Road, just off Cheltenham Road, was formerly Waverley School. Before that it was built as Honor Oak Girls’ Grammar School. It was also the South London Emergency School during WW2,taking girls from various schools in the vicinity, including those returning from being evacuated.

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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NEARBY STREETS
Bala Green, NW9 Bala Green is a location in London.
Camarthen Green, NW9 Camarthen Green is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Colin Close, NW9 Colin Close is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Colin Crescent, NW9 Colin Crescent is a street in Kingsbury.
Colin Drive, NW9 Colin Drive is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Colin Gardens, NW9 Colin Gardens is a street in Kingsbury.
Connaught Business Centre, NW9 Connaught Business Centre is a location in London.
Crossway, NW9 Crossway is a street in Kingsbury.
Crummock Gardens, NW9 Crummock Gardens is a street in Kingsbury.
Deerfield Close, NW9 Deerfield Close is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Derwent Avenue, NW9 Derwent Avenue is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Derwent Rise, NW9 Derwent Rise is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Ennerdale Drive, NW9 Ennerdale Drive is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Forest Gate, NW9 Forest Gate is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Fryent Fields, NW9 Fryent Fields is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Gadsbury Close, NW9 Gadsbury Close is a street in Kingsbury.
Goldsmith Avenue, NW9 Goldsmith Avenue is a street in Kingsbury.
Highcroft, NW9 Highcroft is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Hillfield Avenue, NW9 Hillfield Avenue is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Hyde Crescent, NW9 Hyde Crescent is a street in Kingsbury.
Hyde Estate Road, NW9 Hyde Estate Road is a street in Kingsbury.
Irving Way, NW9 Irving Way is a street in Kingsbury.
Lodore Gardens, NW9 Lodore Gardens is a street in Kingsbury.
Mardale Drive, NW9 Mardale Drive is a street in Kingsbury.
Meadow Way, NW9 Meadow Way is a road in the NW9 postcode area
New Way Road, NW9 New Way Road is a street in Kingsbury.
Northgate Drive, NW9 Northgate Drive is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Reets Farm Close, NW9 Reets Farm Close is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Rookery Close, NW9 Rookery Close is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Rookery Way, NW9 Rookery Way is a street in Kingsbury.
Rushgrove Avenue, NW9 Rushgrove Avenue is a street in Kingsbury.
Rushgrove Parade, NW9 Rushgrove Parade is a street in Kingsbury.
Ruthin Close, NW9 Ruthin Close is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Rydal Gardens, NW9 Rydal Gardens is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Scottwell Drive, NW9 Scottwell Drive is a street in Kingsbury.
Sheaveshill Parade, NW9 Sheaveshill Parade is a street in Kingsbury.
Silkfield Road, NW9 Silkfield Road is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Snowdon Drive, NW9 Snowdon Drive is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Springfield Gardens, NW9 Springfield Gardens is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Springfield Mount, NW9 Springfield Mount is a street in Kingsbury.
St Matthias Close, NW9 St Matthias Close is a street in Kingsbury.
Stancroft, NW9 Stancroft is a street in Kingsbury.
Talgarth Walk, NW9 Talgarth Walk is a road in the NW9 postcode area
The Greenhouse, NW9 Residential block
The Hyde Industrial Estate, NW9 The Hyde Industrial Estate is a street in Kingsbury.
The Hyde, NW9 The Hyde is a street in Kingsbury.
The Ridgeway, NW9 The Ridgeway is a crescent north of Wakemans Hill Avenue.
Tyre Lane, NW9 Tyre Lane runs parallel to Edgware Road.
Varley Parade, NW9 Varley Parade is a street in Kingsbury.
Wilberforce Road, NW9 Wilberforce Road is a street in Kingsbury.
Woodfield Avenue, NW9 Woodfield Avenue is a road in the NW9 postcode area

NEARBY PUBS
Black Leaf This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Erin’s Hope This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Funky Brownz This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Moon Under Water This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Shanakee This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Colindale

Colindale is an area of north London lying to the northwest of Hendon.

Formerly in the borough and ancient parish of Hendon, Colindale was essentially the dale between Mill Hill and Burroughs. By the middle of the 20th century, it had come to include that part of the Edgware Road between The Hyde, and Burnt Oak.

The area is named after a 16th century family of the same name. Until the 20th century Collindale, was without any buildings save for a large house called Collindale Lodge, Collindale Farm, and a few cottages. (A spelling with two L’s has been used, as on this printed in 1873.) All of these properties were on Collindeep Lane, which had in the medieval period been an alternative route out of London (via Hampstead, Golders Green, and Hendon) to the Edgware Road. By the end of the 16th century it was not often used as a main road, and by the middle part of the 19th century was called Ancient Street.

By the end of the 19th century cheap land prices made Colindale attractive to developers. Colindale Hospital was started in 1898 as an asylum for the long term sick of central London, and The Government Lymph Establishment for making vaccines was built in 1907. By 1996 the majority of the hospital was closed, and at present lies mostly derelict. In 1902 the British Museum built a new depository, and kept the newspaper collection there from 1934.

Garstin’s Ltd established a trunk factory in 1901, as well as a row of cottages called Leatherville, as such they constitute the first manufacturer in the Collindale. By 1914 there was already housing between Colindale Avenue and Annesley avenues mostly to house the workers of these endeavours. Immediately after the First World War a number of other manufacturing companies came to Colindale. Franco Illuminated Signs came to Aerodrome Road in 1922. They made their money making the lights for the Franco British Exhibition (1909), from which they took their name (later abbreviated to Franco). They were best known for the neon signs to be found in Piccadilly from the 1920s to the 1970s. Frigidaire started in a wooden shack in Aerodrome Road, employing 11 people in 1923, and selling the first automatic household fridges in England. The reason why many of these and other companies chose Colindale was that there was land available for expansion. However by 1923 the tube railway reached Colindale, land prices increased and factory expansion was not realisable. A number of industries looked elsewhere for premises. In 1931 Fridgdaire, for example, decided to build a new manufacturing plant on the Edgware Road and had moved its entire operations there by 1946.

Colindale station opened on 18 August 1924 on what was then the Hampstead and Highgate Line as the first station on the second section of the Underground’s extension to Edgware.

After the station opened suburban development was rapid, and by 1939 much of the western side was semi-detached housing. Typical is the Colin Park Estate built by F. H. Stucke & Co, built around Colindeep Lane (1927). A number of the houses on this estate are by the architect E. G. Trobridge. St Matthias started as a mission church in 1905. Its permanent building was opened in 1934 and rebuilt 1971-3. Colindale infants’ school was started in Colindeep Lane in 1921, with a new building constructed in Woodfield Avenue in 1933. In September of 1940 Colindale tube station and the Newpaper Library (rebuilt 1957) were bombed, and the site was visited by George VI and Queen Elizabeth, the late Queen Mother. The V1 flying bombs hit Colindale Hospital on 1 July 1944 killing four members of the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force.

Places of interest include the British Library newspaper depository, the Royal Air Force Museum, Barnet College, and the Peel Centre (better known as Hendon Police College).

A small brook, a tributary of the River Brent called the Silk Stream, runs north to south. Here also is the Grahame Park Estate, built on the former Hendon Aerodrome.


LOCAL PHOTOS
West Hendon from above
TUM image id: 1489498601
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Edgware Road in Colindale
TUM image id: 1517936686
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Welsh Harp
Credit: Unknown
TUM image id: 1534456927
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Plough - reputedly 800 years old
TUM image id: 1517936032
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Silk Stream near Colindale (1916)
TUM image id: 1517938166
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
West Hendon from above
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Silk Stream near Colindale (1916)
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

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