Lots Road, SW10

Road, existing between the 1820s and now

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Road · * · SW10 ·
MAY
27
2018

Lots Road, older than the surrounding streets, was once Pooles Lane which was a track leading to Chelsea Farm.

From Anglo-Saxon times, the land on the northern banks of the Thames was divided into individually owned ‘lots’, and open to common pasturage after the annual harvest. In 1825 the ‘Lammas’ rights of common grazing were abolished on the ‘Lots’.

When the Cremorne Gardens closed in the 1860s, the landowner Mrs Simpson, let the land as building plots for the construction of workers’ housing. The variety and range of materials and architectural detailing amongst the workers cottages suggests that a number of different builders constructed the housing.

Historic maps indicate that much of the land was developed within a short period of time between 1868 and 1896. Tadema Road (Tadema Street), which has Dutch and classical elements, was almost certainly named after Lawrence Alma-Tadema, a Dutch artist who moved to London in 1870 and enjoyed great frame during the mid to late 1870s, when those houses were constructed.

Running in parallel with the construction of workers cottages was the development along the river banks of the Thames. Flour Mills and a Horticultural Works already occupied
land adjacent to Chelsea Creek to the west of Pooles Lane (later to become Lots Road). From the late 1870s a large number of wharfs were constructed for commercial uses.

The rest of Chelsea is overwhelmingly residential and so the Lots Road community - a working area of industry, commercial riverside uses, small factories, breweries and workshops within a working class community housed in artisan terraced housing - was unusual.

The road contained the landmark Lots Road Power Station, which had an influential historic role in powering the London Underground and is architecturally significant as a symbol of innovative design, structure and engineering.

The terraces which housed local workers are well preserved despite numerous threats from bombs during World War II. The York stone streets are lined with traditional lamp posts and
small trees; and the proximity to the River Thames in particular, makes this an unusual and characterful part of the Royal Borough.

In the post war years, the Lots Road area was earmarked for a potential route for a new motorway crossing the river known as the West Cross Route.

The prohibitive cost and the unpopularity of proposed major road works eventually led to much of the West Cross route being abandoned in 1973. However, the consequences for the
Lots Road area was one of general neglect and degeneration until twentieth century developments made the area extremely desirable.


Main source: Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea
Further citations and sources


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963-65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

Reply
Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
John Neill   
Added: 25 Nov 2021 11:30 GMT   

Sandringham Road, E10 (1937 - 1966)
I lived at No. 61 with my parents during these years. I went to Canterbury Road school (now Barclay Primary) and sang as a boy soprano (treble) in the church choir at St Andrew’s church, on the corner of Forest Glade.
Opposite us lived the Burgess family. Their son Russell also sang in my choir as a tenor. He later became a well-known musician and the choirmaster at Wandsworth Boys’ School.
Just at the end of WW2 a German rocket (V2) landed in the grounds of Whipps Cross Hospital, damaging many of the houses in Sandringham Road, including ours.

Reply
Comment
Tim Stevenson   
Added: 16 Nov 2021 18:03 GMT   

Pub still open
The Bohemia survived the 2020/21 lockdowns and is still a thriving local social resource.

Reply
Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

Reply

STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

Reply

Sir Walter Besant   
Added: 11 Nov 2021 18:47 GMT   

Sir Walter adds....
All the ground facing Wirtemberg Street at Chip and Cross Streets is being levelled for building and the old houses are disappearing fast. The small streets leading through into little Manor Street are very clean and tenanted by poor though respectable people, but little Manor Street is dirty, small, and narrow. Manor Street to Larkhall Rise is a wide fairly clean thoroughfare of mixed shops and houses which improves towards the north. The same may be said of Wirtemberg Street, which commences poorly, but from the Board School north is far better than at the Clapham end.

Source: London: South of the Thames - Chapter XX by Sir Walter Besant (1912)

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

Reply
Comment
tom   
Added: 3 Nov 2021 05:16 GMT   

I met
someone here 6 years ago

Reply
Comment
Fion Anderson   
Added: 2 Nov 2021 12:55 GMT   

Elstree not Borehamwood
Home of the UK film industry

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Chelsea Farm Chelsea Farm was established on the northern banks of the Thames on land previously open to common pasturage after the annual harvest.
Cremorne Gardens Cremorne Gardens, with a vestige existing today, was in its prime between 1846 and 1877.
Lots Road Power Station Lots Road Power Station was a coal (and later oil-fired then gas-fired) power station, which supplied electricity to the London Underground system.
Sands End Sands End was a close knit working class community.

NEARBY STREETS
Althorpe Mews, SW11 Althorpe Mews is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Ashburnham Road, SW10 Ashburnham Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Bagleys Lane, SW6 Bagleys Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
Battersea Church Road, SW11 Battersea Church Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Battersea Square, SW11 Battersea Square is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Billing Road, SW10 Billing Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Billing Street, SW10 Billing Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Blantyre Street, SW10 Blantyre Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Bridges Place, SW6 Bridges Place is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
Burnaby Street, SW10 Burnaby Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Cambria Street, SW6 Cambria Street is a road in the SW6 postcode area
Chelsea Harbour Drive, SW10 Chelsea Harbour Drive is a road in the SW10 postcode area
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Cooper House, SW6 Residential block
Cotswold Mews, SW11 Cotswold Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Cremorne Road, SW10 Cremorne Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Damer Terrace, SW10 Damer Terrace is a road in the SW10 postcode area
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Design Centre, SW10 Chelsea Harbour Design Centre lies on Harbour Avenue.
East Road, SW10 East Road is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Edith Grove, SW10 Edith Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Edith Terrace, SW10 Edith Terrace is a road in the SW10 postcode area
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Gunter Grove, SW10 Gunter Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Gwyn Close, SW6 Gwyn Close is a road in the SW6 postcode area
Harbour Avenue, SW6 Harbour Avenue is a road in the Chelsea Harbour area.
Harbour Yard, SW10 Harbour Yard is a block in Imperial Wharf.
Holmead Road, SW6 Holmead Road is a road in the SW6 postcode area
Hortensia Road, SW10 Hortensia Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Imperial Road, SW6 Imperial Road is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
Imperial Square, SW6 Imperial Square is a road in the SW6 postcode area
King’s Road, SW10 This is a street in the SW10 postcode area
King’s Road, SW6 This is a street in the SW6 postcode area
Kings Road, SW10 Kings Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Kings Road, SW6 Kings Road is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
King’s Road, SW6 King’s Road is a road in the SW6 postcode area
Lockgate Road, SW6 Lockgate Road is a location in London.
Maltings Place, SW6 Maltings Place is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
Maynard Close, SW6 Maynard Close is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
Michael Road, SW6 Michael Road is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
Micheal Road, SW6 Micheal Road is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
Raasay Street, SW10 Raasay Street ran from Dartrey Road to Edith Grove.
Riley Street, SW10 Riley Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Rumbold Road, SW6 Rumbold Road is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
Slaidburn Street, SW10 Slaidburn Street is a street in London
Stadium Street, SW10 Stadium Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Sunbury Lane, SW11 Sunbury Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Tadema Road, SW10 Tadema Road was named after Lawrence Alma-Tadema
Tetcott Road, SW10 Tetcott Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Thames Avenue, SW10 Thames Avenue is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Thames Towpath, SW10 Thames Towpath is a road in the SW10 postcode area
The Chambers, SW10 The Chambers is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
The Crainewell, SW6 The Crainewell is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
The Plaza, SW10 The Plaza is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Thorndike Close, SW10 Thorndike Close is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Thorney Crescent, SW11 Thorney Crescent is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Upcerne Road, SW10 Upcerne Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Upper Whistler Walk, SW10 This is a street in the SW10 postcode area
Uverdale Road, SW10 Uverdale Road runs north from Lots Road.
Valiant House, SW11 Residential block
Vicarage Walk, SW11 Vicarage Walk is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Wandon Road, SW6 Wandon Road is a road in the SW6 postcode area
Wardens Square, SW6 Wardens Square is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
Waterfront Drive, SW10 Waterfront Drive is a location in London.
West Road, SW10 West Road is a road in the SW10 postcode area
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Worlds End Place, SW10 Worlds End Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Butchers Hook This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Chelsea Pensioner This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Chelsea Ram This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Fox & Pheasant This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hilton Doubletree This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lots Road Pub & Dining room This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Mare Moto This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Queen Elizabeth This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Imperial This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Jam Tree This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Zefi Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 190005, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Elm Park Gardens
TUM image id: 1573064988
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The Dancing Platform at Cremorne Gardens
Credit: Phoebus Levin (1864)
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Boys and girls kick a ball around a quiet Uverdale Road, Chelsea (early 1960s). The road is now filled with parked cars and a gated playground. Just down the road from major bomb sites, this was one of a cluster of streets that became a ghost town in the wake of the Blitz
Credit: John Bignell
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Chelsea Farm in the days of Countess Huntindon
Credit: Kensington and Chelsea Libraries
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Lots Road Power Station (2005).
Credit: Adrian Pingstone
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Graffiti, Raasay Street, Chelsea (1969).
Credit: Roger Perry
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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