Manningtree Street, E1

Road in/near Aldgate East

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(51.51525 -0.06943, 51.515 -0.069) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · Aldgate East · E1 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Manningtree Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.




CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

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Tricia   
Added: 27 Apr 2021 12:05 GMT   

St George in the East Church
This Church was opened in 1729, designed by Hawksmore. Inside destroyed by incendrie bomb 16th April 1941. Rebuilt inside and finished in 1964. The building remained open most of the time in a temporary prefab.

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Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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Comment
Marion James   
Added: 12 Mar 2021 17:43 GMT   

26 Edith Street Haggerston
On Monday 11th October 1880 Charlotte Alice Haynes was born at 26 Edith Street Haggerston the home address of her parents her father Francis Haynes a Gilder by trade and her mother Charlotte Alice Haynes and her two older siblings Francis & George who all welcomed the new born baby girl into the world as they lived in part of the small Victorian terraced house which was shared by another family had an outlook view onto the world of the Imperial Gas Works site - a very grey drab reality of the life they were living as an East End working class family - 26 Edith Street no longer stands in 2021 - the small rundown polluted terrace houses of Edith Street are long since gone along with the Gas Companies buildings to be replaced with green open parkland that is popular in 21st century by the trendy residents of today - Charlotte Alice Haynes (1880-1973) is the wife of my Great Grand Uncle Henry Pickett (1878-1930) As I research my family history I slowly begin to understand the life my descendants had to live and the hardships that they went through to survive - London is my home and there are many areas of this great city I find many of my descendants living working and dying in - I am yet to find the golden chalice! But in all truthfulness my family history is so much more than hobby its an understanding of who I am as I gather their stories. Did Charlotte Alice Pickett nee Haynes go on to live a wonderful life - no I do not think so as she became a widow in 1930 worked in a canteen and never remarried living her life in and around Haggerston & Hackney until her death in 1973 with her final resting place at Manor Park Cemetery - I think Charlotte most likely excepted her lot in life like many women from her day, having been born in the Victorian era where the woman had less choice and standing in society, which is a sad state of affairs - So I will endeavour to write about Charlotte and the many other women in my family history to give them the voice of a life they so richly deserve to be recorded !

Edith Street was well situated for the new public transport of two railway stations in 1880 :- Haggerston Railway Station opened in 1867 & Cambridge Heath Railway Station opened in 1872


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Lived here
Linda    
Added: 18 Feb 2021 22:03 GMT   

Pereira Street, E1
My grandfather Charles Suett lived in Periera Street & married a widowed neighbour there. They later moved to 33 Bullen House, Collingwood Street where my father was born.

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Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 8 Jun 2021 08:08 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Lived here #40 1942-1967

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Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:17 GMT   

Hewer Street W10
John Nodes Undertakers Hewer Street W10

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Comment
   
Added: 2 Jun 2021 16:58 GMT   

Parachute bomb 1941
Charles Thomas Bailey of 82 Morley Road was killed by the parachute bomb March 1941

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Added: 1 Jun 2021 12:41 GMT   

Abbeville Road (1940 street directory)
North west side
1A Clarke A S Ltd, motor engineers
15 Plumbers, Glaziers & Domestic Engineers Union
25 Dixey Edward, florist
27 Vicary Miss Doris J, newsagent
29 Stenning John Andrew, dining rooms
31 Clarke & Williams, builders
33 Hill Mrs Theodora, confectioner
35 Golding W & sons, corn dealers
... here is Shandon road ...
37 Pennington Mrs Eliz Harvie, wine & spirit merchant
39 Westminster Catering Co Ltd, ham, beef & tongue dealers
41 Masters A (Clapham) Ltd, butchers
43 Thomas Euan Ltd, grocers
45 Garrett C T & Co Ltd, undertakers
47 Mayle T & Sons, fishmongers
49 Mayles Ltd, fruiterers
51 & 73 Hardy Arthur Sydney, draper
53 United Dairies (London) Ltd
... here is Narbonne avenue ...
55 Norris William Lennox, baker
57 Silver Star Laundry Ltd
59 Thorp John, oilman
61 Bidgood Leonard George, boot makers
63 Wilkie Rt Miln, chemist
65 Gander George Albert Isaac, hairdresser
67 Harris Alfred William, greengrocer
69 & 71 Lambert Ernest & Son Ltd, grocers
... here is Hambolt road ...
73 & 51 Hardy Arthur Sydney, draper
75 Cambourn Frederick, butcher
77 Siggers Clement, chemist
77 Post, Money Order, Telephone Call & Telegraph Office & Savings Bank
79 Hemmings William, baker
... here is Elms road ...
85 Cornish Joseph
91 Bedding Mrs
151 Johnson Mrs H K
157 Robinson Albert Ernest, grainer
173 Yardleys London & Provincial Stores Ltd, wine & spirit merchants
175 Clark Alfred, butcher
175A Morley Douglas Frederick, confectioner
... here is Crescent lane ...
... her is St Alphonsus road ...

South east side
... here is Trouville road ...
4 Bossy Miss, private school
... here are Bonneville gardens ...
24 Osborn Charles Edward, ladies hairdresser
24 Hall H Ltd, builders
24A Walton Lodge Laundry Ltd
... here are Shandon road & Abbeville mansions ...
28 Copley Fred Smith, chemist
30 Finch H G Ltd, laundry
32 Carter William Alfred, furniture dealer
34 Spriggs Charles & Co, wireless supplies dealer
36 Miles Frederick William, confectioner
38 Pitman Frederick, hairdresser
40 Rowe Frederick F, valeting service
42 Modridge Edward J, oilman
... here is Narbonne avenue ...
44 Southorn Albert, butcher
46 Brown Ernest, fruiterer
48 Stanley Mrs A A, confectioner
50 Fryatt Owen, delixatessen store
52 Benbrooks, domestic stores
54 Davis William Clifford, boot repairer
56 Blogg Alfred, newsagent
58 Rowlands Thomas & Sons, dairy
... here are Hambalt, Elms, Franconia, Caldervale & Leppoc roads ...
124 Clarke Frederick, decorator
... here are Crescent lane, Briarwood road & Park hill ...

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Comment
Boo Horton    
Added: 31 May 2021 13:39 GMT   

Angel & Trumpet, Stepney Green
The Angel & Trumpet Public House in Stepney Green was run by my ancestors in the 1930’s. Unfortunately, it was a victim on WWII and was badly damaged and subsequently demolished. I have one photograph that I believe to bethe pub, but it doesn’t show much more that my Great Aunt cleaning the steps.

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Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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PETER FAIRCLOUGH   
Added: 10 May 2021 14:46 GMT   

We once lived here
My family resided at number 53 Brindley Street Paddington.
My grandparents George and Elizabeth Jenkinson (ne Fowler) had four children with my Mother Olive Fairclough (ne Jenkinson) being born in the house on 30/09/1935.
She died on 29/04/2021 aged 85 being the last surviving of the four siblings

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
29 Aldgate High Street 29 Aldgate High Street is a demolished property, originally on the north side of Aldgate High Street..
46 Aldgate High Street This Grade II Listed office building is one of the few timber-framed buildings in the City that predates the Great Fire of 1666.
Aldgate Aldgate was one of the massive gates which defended the City from Roman times until 1760.
Aldgate bus station Aldgate Bus Station serves the Aldgate area of the City of London.
Altab Ali Park Altab Ali Park is a small park on Adler Street, White Church Lane and Whitechapel Road.
Boar’s Head Theatre The Boar’s Head Theatre was an inn-yard theatre in the Whitechapel area.
Goodman’s Fields Goodman’s Fields was a farm beyond the walls of the City.
Goodman’s Fields Theatre Two 18th century theatres bearing the name Goodman’s Fields Theatre were located on Alie Street, Whitechapel.
Holy Trinity, Minories Holy Trinity, Minories was a Church of England parish church outside the eastern boundaries of the City of London, but within the Liberties of the Tower of London.
Pavilion Theatre The Pavilion Theatre at 191–193 Whitechapel Road was the first major theatre to open in the East End.
Portsoken Portsoken is one of 25 wards in the City of London, each electing an alderman to the Court of Aldermen and commoners (the City equivalent of a councillor) elected to the Court of Common Council of the City of London Corporation.
St Botolph’s St. Botolph’s without Aldgate, located on Aldgate High Street, has existed for over a thousand years.
St George’s German Lutheran Church St George’s German Lutheran Church is a church in Alie Street, Whitechapel.
St Mary Matfelon St Mary Matfelon church was popularly known as St Mary’s, Whitechapel.
Toynbee Hall Toynbee Hall is a building which is the home of a charity of the same name.
Wentworth Street Turn-of-the-century fashion in east London.
Whitechapel Gallery The Whitechapel Gallery is a public art gallery in Aldgate.

NEARBY STREETS
Adler Street, E1 Adler Street runs between the Whitechapel Road and the Commercial Road.
Aldgate High Street, EC3N Once the route to one of the six original gates of the Wall of London, Aldgate High Street has an important place in medieval London’s history.
Aldgate House, EC3N A street within the EC3N postcode
Aldgate, EC3N Aldgate was the easternmost gateway through the London Wall leading from the City of London to Whitechapel and the East End.
Alie Street, E1 Originally called Ayliff Street, Alie Street was named after a relative of William Leman, whose great-uncle, John Leman had bought Goodman’s Fields.
Amazon Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
America Square, EC3N America Square is a street and small square, built in about 1760 and dedicated to the American colonies.
Angel Alley, E1 Angel Alley was a narrow passage which ran north-south from Wentworth Street to Whitechapel High Street..
Arcadia Court, E1 Arcadia Court is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Artillery Lane, E1 The name Artillery Lane remembers the skills of the operators of the longbow.
Artillery Passage, E1 Artillery Passage dates from its time as part of The Old Artillery Ground.
Artizan Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Arts Quarter, E1 Arts Quarter is a road in the E1 postcode area
Assam Street, E1 Assam Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Back Church Lane, E1 Back Church Lane is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Back Mews, E1 Back Mews is a road in the SE4 postcode area
Batty Street, E1 Batty Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Bell Lane, E1 Bell Lane is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Black Lion Yard, E1 Black Lion Yard was a narrow thoroughfare running north-south from Old Montague Street (where it was accessible via a set of steps) to Whitechapel Road.
Bowmans Mews, E1 Bowmans Mews is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Boyard Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Boyd Street, E1 Boyd Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Braham Street, E1 Braham Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Bridle Mews, E1 Bridle Mews is a location in London.
Brody House, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Brune House, E1 Residential block
Brune Street, E1 Brune Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Brushfield Street, E1 Brushfield Street is a thoroughfare running east-west from Commercial Street to Bishopsgate.
Buckle Street, E1 Buckle Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Burslem Street, E1 Burslem Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Camperdown Street, E1 Camperdown Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Canter Way, E1 Canter Way is a location in London.
Carillon Court, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Carlisle Avenue, EC3N Carlisle Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC3N postal area.
Casson Street, E1 Casson Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Central House, E1 Residential block
Challoner Walk, E1 Challoner Walk is a location in London.
Chaucer Gardens, E1 Chaucer Gardens is a location in London.
Chicksand Street, E1 Chicksand Street runs east from Brick Lane.
Christian Street, E1 Christian Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Circle Place, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Cobb Street, E1 Cobb Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
College East, E1 College East is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Coney Way, E1 Coney Way is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Contemporary Art Gallery, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Coppergate House, E1 Residential block
Crinoline Mews, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Crispin Street, E1 Crispin Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Crosswall, EC3N Crosswall was formerly named John Street, after King John.
Davenant Street, E1 Davenant Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Denning Point 33 Commercial Street, E1 A block within the E1 postcode
Dorset Street, E1 Dorset Street was a small thoroughfare running east-west from Crispin Street to Commercial Street.
Dowson Place, E1 Dowson Place appears on the 1862 Stanford map.
Duval Square, E1 Duval Square is a location in London.
East Tenter Street, E1 East Tenter Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Education Square, E1 Education Square is a location in London.
Ellen Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Ely Place, E1 Ely Place appears on the 1862 Stanford map.
Enterprise House, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Fairclough Street, E1 Fairclough Street runs from Back Church Lane to Christian Street.
Fashion Street, E1 Fashion Street is a thoroughfare running east-west from Brick Lane to Commercial Street.
Fieldgate Street, E1 Fieldgate Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Flower & Dean Walk, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Flower and Dean Street, E1 Flower and Dean Street was a narrow street running east-west from Commercial Street to Brick Lane.
Forbes Street, E1 Forbes Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Fordham Street, E1 Fordham Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Frostic Walk, E1 Frostic Walk leads from Chicksand Street to Old Montague Street.
Frying Pan Alley, E1 Frying Pan Alley is situated close to Middlesex Street and its Petticoat Lane market.
Fulbourne Street, E1 Fulbourne Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
George Street, E1 George Street was a street running north-south from Flower and Dean Street to Wentworth Street, crossing Thrawl Street approx. half way along its length..
Golding Street, E1 Golding Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Goodman Stile, E1 Goodman Stile is a location in London.
Goodman Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Goulston Street, E1 Goulston Street is a thoroughfare running north-south from Wentworth Street to Whitechapel High Street.
Gower’s Walk, E1 This is a street in the E1 postcode area
Gravel Lane, E1 Gravel Lane is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Greatorex Street, E1 Greatorex Street was formerly called High Street.
Green Dragon Yard, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Greenfield Road, E1 Greenfield Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Gun Street, E1 Gun Street was part of the Old Artillery Ground - land formerly designated one of the Liberties of the Tower of London.
Gunthorpe Street, E1 Gunthorpe Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Harrow Place, E1 Harrow Place is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Haydon Street, E1 The eastern end of Haydon Street was called Mansell Passage.
Haydon Street, EC3N Haydon Street heads east from the Minories.
Heneage Street, E1 Heneage Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Henriques Street, E1 Henriques Street was formerly called Berner Street.
Hessel Street, E1 Hessel Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Hooper Street, E1 Hooper Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Hopetown Street, E1 This is a street in the E1 postcode area
Houndsditch, EC3A A street within the EC3A postcode
Ibex House, EC3N Residential block
India Street, EC3N India Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3N postal area.
Jewry Street, EC3N Jewry Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3N postal area.
John Sessions Square, E1 John Sessions Square lies off of Alie Street.
Kent and Essex Yard, E1 Kent and Essex Yard ran north of Whitechapel High Street, close to the west side of Commercial Street.
Kinder Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Kings Arms Court, E1 Kings Arms Court is a road in the E1 postcode area
Langdale Street, E1 Langdale Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Leman Street, E1 Leman Street was named after Sir John Leman.
Leyden Street, E1 Leyden Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Little Paternoster Row, E1 Little Paternoster Row was once known as French Alley.
Little Somerset Street, E1 Little Somerset Street was originally called Harrow Alley but colloquially known as ’Blood Alley.’
Loft House 46a Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Lolesworth Close, E1 Lolesworth Close is a short cul-de-sac on the east side of Commercial Street which was originally the western extremity of Flower and Dean Street.
London Fruit Exchange, E1 London Fruit Exchange is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Luntley Place, E1 Luntley Place appears on the 1862 Stanford map.
Mansell Street, E1 Mansell Street runs north-south on the City of London border.
Market Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Martineau Square, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Middlesex Street, E1 Middlesex Street is home to the Petticoat Lane Market.
Middlesex Street, EC3A Middlesex Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
Minories, EC3N Minories is one of the old streets of the City of London.
Mitali Passage, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Monthope Road, E1 This is a street in the E1 postcode area
Moss Close, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Mount Terrace, E1 Mount Terrace is a road in the E1 postcode area
Mulberry Street, E1 Mulberry Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Myrdle Street, E1 Myrdle Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Nathaniel Close, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
New Drum Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
New Goulston Street, E1 New Goulston Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
New Road, E1 New Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
North Tenter Street, E1 North Tenter Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Odeon Court, E1 Odeon Court is on Chicksand Street.
Old Castle Street, E1 Old Castle Street runs north-south from Wentworth Street to Whitechapel High Street, the southern section of which incorporates the former Castle Alley, murder site of Ripper victim Alice McKenzie.
Old Montague Street, E1 Old Montague Street is a thoroughfare running east-west from Baker’s Row (now Vallance Road) to Brick Lane.
Osborn Place, E1 Osborn Place appears on maps between 1800 and 1900.
Osborn Street, E1 Osborn Street is a short road leading from Whitechapel Road to the crossroads with Brick Lane, Wentworth Street and Old Montague Street.
Osborne Street, E1 Osborne Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Osbourne Street, E1 Osbourne Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Parfett Street, E1 Parfett Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Petticoat Square, E1 A street within the postcode
Petticoat Tower, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Philchurch Place, E1 Philchurch Place is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Piazza Walk, E1 Piazza Walk is a location in London.
Pinchin Street, E1 Pinchin Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Plumbers Row, E1 Plumbers Row is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Pomell Way, E1 Pomell Way is a road in the E1 postcode area
Ponler Street, E1 Ponler Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Portsoken Street, EC3N Portsoken Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Prescot Street, E1 Prescot Street was named for Rebecca Prescott, wife of William Leman.
Regal Close, E1 Regal Close is a road in the E1 postcode area
Resolution Plaza, E1 Resolution Plaza is a location in London.
Riga Mews, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Romford Street, E1 Romford Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Rope Walk Gardens, E1 Rope Walk Gardens is a location in London.
Ropewalk Gardens, EC1M Ropewalk Gardens is a location in London.
Rupert Street, E1 Rupert Street was situated to the east of Leman Street.
Saracen’s Head Yard, EC3N Saracen’s Head Yard was to the south of Aldgate.
Scarborough Street, E1 This is a street in the E1 postcode area
Settles Street, E1 Settles Street links Fieldgate Street with Commercial Road.
South Tenter Street, E1 South Tenter Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Spellman Street, E1 Spellman Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Spelman House, E1 Spelman House is a residential block in Whitechapel.
Spelman Street, E1 Spelman Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Spring Walk, E1 Spring Walk is a road in the E1 postcode area
St Botolph Street, EC3A St Botolph Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
St Clare House, EC3N Residential block
St Clare Street, EC3N St Clare Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3N postal area.
St Mark Street, E1 St Mark Street was built on the old Goodman’s Fields.
Stable Walk, E1 Stable Walk is a location in London.
Stoney Lane, EC3A Stoney Lane is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Strype Street, E1 John Strype, who became an antiquary, historian and parson was the son of a Huguenot weaver and born here in 1643.
Stutfield Street, E1 Stutfield Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Sugar House, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Technology Centre, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Tenter Ground, E1 Tenter Ground is one of the notable streets of Spitalfields.
The Community Centre, E1 The Community Centre is a location in London.
The Loom, EC3R The Loom is a location in London.
Thrawl Street, E1 Originally built by Henry Thrall (or Thrale) c.1656, Thrawl Street ran east-west from Brick Lane as far as George Street across a former tenter field owned by the Fossan brothers, Thomas and Lewis.
Toynbee Street, E1 Toynbee Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Twyne House 3 Boyd Street, E1 Twyne House 3 Boyd Street is a location in London.
Tyne Street, E1 Tyne Street is a location in London.
Umberston Street, E1 Umberston Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Vine Court, E1 Vine Court is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Vine Street, EC3N Vine Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3N postal area.
Wentworth Street, E1 Wentworth Street runs east-west from the junction of Brick Lane, Osborn Street and Old Montague Street to Middlesex Street, forming part of the boundary between Spitalfields and St Mary’s Whitechapel.
West Tenter Street, E1 West Tenter Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
White Church Lane, E1 White Church Lane is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
White Church Passage, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
White Kennett Street, EC3A White Kennett Street was named after a Bishop of Peterborough.
Whitechapel High Street, E1 Whitechapel High Street runs approximately west-east from Aldgate High Street to Whitechapel Road and is designated as part of the A11.
Whitechapel Market, E1 Whitechapel Market is a road in the E1 postcode area
Whitechapel Road, E1 Whitechapel Road is a major arterial road in East London.
Whitechapel Technology Centre, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Whites Row, E1 White’s Row is a narrow thoroughfare running east-west from Commercial Street to Crispin Street.
Wicker Street, E1 Wicker Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Wool House, E1 A street within the E1 postcode

NEARBY PUBS
Abbey This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bierschenke Bierkellar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
City Sports Pub and Grill This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Dirty Martini This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Duke of Somerset This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Emperor Wine Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Jamies This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Still and Star The Still & Star was on Little Somerset Street near to Aldgate High Street.
The Angel This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Hoop & Grapes This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Peacock This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Three Lords This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Three Tuns This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Aldgate East

In a land east of Aldgate, lies the land of Aldgate East...

The name Commercial Road had been proposed for the original Aldgate East station, which opened on 6 October 1884 as part of an eastern extension to the Metropolitan District Railway (now the District Line), some 500 feet to the west of the current station, close to the Metropolitan Railway's Aldgate station. However, when the curve to join the Metropolitan Railway from Liverpool Street was built, the curve had to be particularly sharp due to the presence of Aldgate East station, at which it needed to be straight.

As part of London Transport's 1935-1940 New Works Programme, the triangular junction at Aldgate was enlarged, to allow for a much gentler curve and to ensure that trains held on any leg of the triangle did not foul the signals and points at other places. The new Aldgate East platforms were sited almost immediately to the east of their predecessors, with one exit facing west toward the original location, and another at the east end of the new platforms.

The new eastern exit was now close enough to the next station along the line, St Mary's (Whitechapel Road), that this station could also be closed, reducing operational overhead and journey times, as the new Aldgate East had effectively replaced two earlier stations.

The new station, opened on 31 October 1938 (the earlier station closing permanently the previous night), was designed to be completely subterranean, providing a much needed pedestrian underpass to the road above. However, in order to accommodate the space needed for this, and the platforms below, the existing track required lowering by more than seven feet. To achieve this task, whilst still keeping the track open during the day, the bed underneath the track was excavated, and the track held up by a timber trestle work. Then, once excavation was complete and the new station constructed around the site, an army of over 900 workmen lowered the whole track simultaneously in one night, utilising overhead hooks to suspend the track when necessary. The hooks still remain.

District and Hammersmith and City line trains running into Aldgate East along two sides of the triangle (from Liverpool Street and from Tower Hill) pass through the site of the earlier station, most of which has been obliterated by the current junction alignment, although the extensive width and height and irregular shape of the tunnel can be observed.

Since the station was built completely under a widened road, and was built after concrete had started to be used as a construction material, the platforms have a particularly high headroom. Combined with the late 1930s style of tiling typical of the stations of the then London Passenger Transport Board, the platform area of the station presents a particularly airy and welcoming appearance, unusual on the underground at the time of construction. The tiling contains relief tiles, showing devices pertinent to London Transport and the area it served, were designed by Harold Stabler and made by the Poole Pottery.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Byward Tower, 1893
TUM image id: 1556882285
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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The Boar’s Head was located on the north side of Whitechapel High Street. The Boar’s Head was originally an inn, which was built in the 1530s; it underwent two renovations for use as a playhouse: first, in 1598, when a simple stage was erected, and a second, more elaborate renovation in 1599.
Credit: Unknown
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The Third Goodmans Fields Theatre, Great Alie Street, London in 1801 - From
Credit: W. W. Hutchings
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A drawing published in 1907 of the west front of the Church of Holy Trinity, Minories
Credit: Uncredited
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Whitechapel Gallery
Credit: LeHaye/Wiki Commons
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Still and Star pub, Aldgate (1968) The pub was a rare remaining working-class pub in the City being a ’slum pub’ - whereby a private house was converted into a hostelry.
Credit: The National Brewery Centre
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A view east along Whitechapel Road including the Pavilion Theatre. The Pavilion was the first major theatre to open in the East End. It opened in 1827 and closed in 1935.
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46 Aldgate High Street
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North side of Aldgate High Street, c.1905
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Brick Lane streetsign.
Credit: James Cridland
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Commercial Street looking south, c.1907. Spitalfields Market is on the right.
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