Uxendon Farm

Farm in/near Wembley Park, existing until 1932

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  MAP  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.57324 -0.28849) 

Uxendon Farm

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Farm · * · ·
MARCH
22
2017

Uxendon was once more important than Wembley.

Uxendon, first recorded in a transaction concerning Hugh of Woxindon in 1257, was a small settlement on the western slopes of Barn Hill. The first part of the name is the same as that in the name Uxbridge and stems either from the Wixan, a 7th century Anglo-Saxon tribe, or from the Celtic for 'water'. The second part is the Old English for
hill.

Medieval Uxendon was very small, but in the 14th or 15th centuries some local people, including the Uxendon family, moved south to form another small community at Forty Green,
where the Sudbury to Kingsbury road crossed the Lidding at Forty Bridge. This settlement was known as Uxendon Forty, Wembley Forty or Preston Forty. The farm at Forty Green was at first called Pargrave's, and later South Forty Farm.

Uxendon became a submanor under the authority of Harrow Manor Court.

Richard Brembre, a grocer and Lord Mayor of London, lived at Uxendon. In 1388 he executed 22 prisoners without trial and was later himself executed for this crime. In 1516 the Bellamy family acquired Uxendon through marriage. They remained staunchly Roman Catholic after the Reformation and sheltered Catholic priests. In 1586 Anthony Babington, a principal conspirator in the Babington plot against Elizabeth I, was arrested on their property.

In 1592 Elizabeth's security services tracked the fugitive Jesuit Robert Southwell to Uxendon. As a result of these arrests the Bellamys suffered considerably in the final years of the 16th century. By 1608 their land was in the hands of the Page family, who had become the leading landowners in the Wembley area.

The Bellamys had already enclosed a small amount of open land. The Pages continued this process throughout the 17th century. In 1655 enclosure of open fields by Richard Page led to changes in the routing of the road east of Preston. This enclosure by the Pages encouraged the general move from arable to meadow in the area in the 18th century.

Nonetheless a significant amount of common land remained to be enclosed at the time of the Enclosure Act of 1803.

By 1732 a new farm, Barn Hill Farm, existed on the summit of Barn Hill. It was no longer there by 1850 and had probably gone by the late 18th century, when Richard Page began building a folly on Barn Hill as part of his improvements at Wembley Park. The folly was still standing in 1820.

In 1829 many of the Page family lands, including Uxendon, went to Henry Young (d. 1869), the junior partner of the Page's solicitor. There is good reason to suspect that Young obtained the lands fraudulently. In the decades that followed Young's death numerous persons turned up claiming the ‘Page millions’, but no-one was successful.

The district did not change significantly in the 19th century. This was due to an agricultural depression after the Napoleonic Wars and London's growing need for hay; both Uxendon and Forty farms had converted to hay farming by 1852. The depression also led to an outbreak of violence in the area around 1828, when desperate agricultural labourers burnt haystacks and threatened local landowners, including the relatively benevolent Lord Northwick.

64 people lived in Preston in 1831 and 57 in 1851. In the same year Uxendon Farm housed 13 people and Forty Farm 10, while three more lived at the top of 302-foot high Barn Hill.In the mid-19th century Uxendon was the venue for steeplechases and well known for its 'sensational water jump', while Forty Farm was famous for horses.

The Metropolitan Railway was built in 1880. The railway had no effect on development, even after the opening of Wembley Park station in 1894. In 1896 the suggestion that a station should be built serving Preston was rejected because the local population was so small. Indeed even in the early 20th century the area was entirely rural, and the
Wealdstone Brook could be described as "one of the most perfect little streams anywhere, abounding in dace and roach."

By 1900 Uxendon Farm had become a shooting ground (the Lancaster Shooting Club). When the Olympic Games were held in London in 1908 the ground was sufficiently important to be
used for Olympic clay pigeon shooting. Pressure from the shooting club, which was a two mile walk from the nearest station, played a part in the opening of Preston Road Halt in May 1908.

Some houses had already been built at Uxendon by 1930. Then in 1932 Uxendon Farm, which was in a terrible condition, was destroyed to make way for the Metropolitan Railway extension from Wembley to Stanmore (later the Bakerloo and today the Jubilee Line). In the years that followed the whole of Uxendon was developed except for Barn Hill Open Space, which had been purchased by the Council from the owners of Preston Farm in 1927.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


Uxendon area from the 1832 Environs of London map

Uxendon area from the 1832 Environs of London map

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Preston Road Preston Road - originally just ’Preston’ - is situated west along the Metropolitan Line from Wembley Park.
Uxendon Farm Uxendon was once more important than Wembley.
Uxendon Shooting Grounds Uxendon Shooting Grounds was the location of the clay pigeon shooting for the 1908 Olympics.

NEARBY STREETS
Alverstone Road, HA9 Alverstone Road is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Basing Hill, HA9 Basing Hill is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Beverley Gardens, HA9 Beverley Gardens is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Blackberry Court 326b, HA3 A street within the HA3 postcode
Brampton Grove, HA9 Brampton Grove is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Carlton Avenue East, HA9 Carlton Avenue East is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Carlton Parade, HA9 Carlton Parade is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Charlton Road, HA9 Charlton Road is a road in the HA9 postcode area
East Hill, HA9 East Hill is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Fernleigh Court, HA9 Fernleigh Court is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Hillside Gardens, HA3 Hillside Gardens is a road in the HA3 postcode area
Ledway Drive, HA3 Ledway Drive is a road in the HA3 postcode area
Ledway Drive, HA9 Ledway Drive is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Longfield Avenue, HA9 Longfield Avenue is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Oxenpark Avenue, HA9 Oxenpark Avenue is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Park Court, HA3 A street within the HA3 postcode
Preston Road, HA3 Preston Road is a main shopping road.
Preston Roadon, HA3 A street within the HA3 postcode
Preston Waye, HA3 Preston Waye is a road in the HA3 postcode area
Ravenscroft Avenue, HA9 Ravenscroft Avenue is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Shaftesbury Avenueon, HA3 A street within the HA3 postcode
The Avenue, HA9 The Avenue is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Uxendon Hill, HA9 Uxendon Hill curves around the area which was once Uxendon Farm.
Viewfield Close, HA3 Viewfield Close is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Wentworth Hill, HA9 Wentworth Hill is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
West Close, HA9 West Close is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
West Hill, HA9 West Hill is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Wilson Close, HA9 Wilson Close is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Wilson Drive, HA9 Wilson Drive is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Wykeham Hill, HA9 Wykeham Hill is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.


Wembley Park

Wembley Park is a London Underground station, the nearest Underground station to the Wembley Stadium complex.

Tracks were laid through the area by the Metropolitan Railway (MR, now the Metropolitan Line) when it extended its services from Willesden Green to Harrow-on-the-Hill. Services to Harrow started on 2 August 1880 although Wembley Park station was not constructed until later.

The station was constructed to serve the pleasure grounds developed by the MR at Wembley Park, a former country estate bought by the company in 1881 as a destination for excursion trips on the company’s trains. The station opened for the first time on 14 October 1893 and initially operated to serve only Saturday football matches in the park. It opened fully on 12 May 1894.

Later in the 1890s, the Great Central Railway’s (GCR’s) London extension was constructed adjacent to the MR’s tracks. The tracks pass under the entrance building but the station has never been served by mainline operators. In 1905 the tracks were electrified and the first electric trains became operational. Between 1913 and 1915, the MR added additional tracks to double the line’s capacity.

On 10 December 1932, the MR opened a branch line north from Wembley Park to Stanmore.

Originally, the MR served all stations south from Wembley Park to Baker Street station but the line suffered from congestion due to limited capacity on the tracks heading into Baker Street. Following the combination of the MR and London’s other underground railways to form the London Passenger Transport Board (LPTB) in 1933, the LPTB took steps to alleviate the congestion by constructing new Bakerloo Line tunnels from Baker Street to connect to the Metropolitan’s tracks south of Finchley Road station. From 20 November 1939, the Bakerloo Line then took over the Metropolitan stopping services between Wembley Park and Finchley Road and the Stanmore branch.

To handle the exceptional passenger numbers associated with the 1948 Olympics held at Wembley Stadium, the original station building was extended and given a new ticket hall and additional circulation routes and platform stairs. At the opening of the Jubilee Line on 1 May 1979, the Bakerloo service from Baker Street to Stanmore was transferred to the new line.

When the UEFA European Football Championship was held at Wembley in 1996, a large staircase was constructed leading down from the 1948 extension and under the newly-built Bobby Moore Bridge, which had opened in 1993. This was intended as a temporary structure and remained in its unfinished state until 2004, when extensive work began on the station in conjunction with the reconstruction of Wembley Stadium. Additional facilities were provided to handle event crowds, and the staircase was completed in time for the opening of the new stadium in 2007.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Brent Town Hall
TUM image id: 1106
Wembley Stadium, 1947
TUM image id: 1556882897
Postcard of Forty Farm
TUM image id: 1557227472
Woodcock Dell farm, Kenton (1901)
TUM image id: 1562854416
The Clarendon Gardens estate (1925)
TUM image id: 1574863417
Oakington Manor Farm
TUM image id: 1603469997
Print-friendly version of this page