Netherton Grove, SW10

Road in/near Chelsea

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(51.48398 -0.18266, 51.483 -0.182) 
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Road · Chelsea · SW10 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Netherton Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963’65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

Reply
Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Watts   
Added: 17 May 2022 20:29 GMT   

Baeethoven St School, also an Annex for Paddington College of FE.
In the early 70’s I took a two year science course at Paddington CFE. The science classes were held on weekday evenings at Beethoven Street school, overseen by chemistry teacher, Mr Tattershall.

Reply

   
Added: 25 Apr 2022 22:11 GMT   

Southover, N12
Everyone knows Central Woodside is the place to be. Ever since kdog moved from finchtown, Woodside has been thriving.

Reply
Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

Reply

Brian Lynch   
Added: 10 Apr 2022 13:38 GMT   

Staples Mattress Factory
An architect’s design of the Staples Mattress Factory
An image found on the website of Dalzell’s Beds, in Armagh Northern Ireland.

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 19 Feb 2022 16:21 GMT   

Harmondsworth (1939 - 1965)
I lived in a house (Lostwithiel) on the Bath Road opposite the junction with Tythe Barn Lane, now a hotel site. Initially, aircraft used one of the diagonal runways directly in line with our house. I attended Sipson Primary School opposite the Three Magpies and celebrated my 21st birthday at The Peggy Bedford in 1959.

Reply

Emma Seif   
Added: 25 Jan 2022 19:06 GMT   

Birth of the Bluestocking Society
In about 1750, Elizabeth Montagu began hosting literary breakfasts in her home at 23 (now 31) Hill Street. These are considered the first meetings of the Bluestocking society.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 14 Jan 2022 03:06 GMT   

Goldbourne Gardens W 10
I lived in Goldbourne Gardens in the 50,s very happy big bomb site

Reply

Chris Nash   
Added: 10 Jan 2022 22:54 GMT   

Shortlands Close, DA17
Shortlands Close and the flats along it were constructed in the mid-1990s. Prior to this, the area was occupied by semi-detached houses with large gardens, which dated from the post-war period and were built on the site of Railway Farm. The farm and its buildings spanned the length of Abbey Road, on the south side of the North Kent Line railway tracks.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Cremorne Gardens Cremorne Gardens, with a vestige existing today, was in its prime between 1846 and 1877.

NEARBY STREETS
Adrian Mews, SW10 Adrian Mews is a small mews off of Ifield Road.
Ann Lane, SW10 Ann Lane is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Ashburnham Road, SW10 Ashburnham Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Beaufort Street, SW3 Beaufort Street was laid out in 1766 on the site of Beaufort House.
Billing Road, SW10 Billing Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Billing Street, SW10 Billing Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Blantyre Street, SW10 Blantyre Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Callow Street, SW3 Callow Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Camera Place, SW10 Camera Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Carmichael Close, SW10 A street within the SW10 postcode
Cathcart Road, SW10 Cathcart Road is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Cavaye Place, SW10 Cavaye Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Chelsea Crescent, SW10 Chelsea Crescent is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Chelsea Park Gardens, SW3 Chelsea Park Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Cheyne Walk, SW10 Cheyne Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Cremorne Road, SW10 Cremorne Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Dartrey Tower, SW10 Dartrey Tower is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
East Road, SW10 East Road is a road in the SW10 postcode area
East Terrace, SW10 East Terrace is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Edith Grove, SW10 Edith Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Edith Terrace, SW10 Edith Terrace is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Edith Yard Edith Grove, SW10 Edith Yard Edith Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Elm Park Gardens, SW10 Elm Park Gardens links Fulham Road with Elm Park Road.
Elm Park Lane, SW10 Elm Park Lane is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Elm Park Mansions, SW10 Elm Park Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Elm Park Road, SW3 Elm Park Road is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Esher House, SW10 Residential block
Farrier Walk, SW10 Farrier Walk is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Fawcett Street, SW10 Fawcett Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Fernshaw Close, SW10 Fernshaw Close is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Fernshaw Road, SW10 Fernshaw Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Finborough Road, SW10 Finborough Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Fulham Road, SW10 Fulham Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Gertrude Street, SW10 Gertrude Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Gilston Road, SW10 Gilston Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Greaves Tower, SW10 Greaves Tower is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Gunter Grove, SW10 Gunter Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Harcourt Terrace, SW10 Harcourt Terrace is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Harley Gardens, SW10 Harley Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Hobury Street, SW10 Hobury Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Hollywood Mews, SW10 Hollywood Mews is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Hollywood Road, SW10 Hollywood Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Hortensia Road, SW10 Hortensia Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Ifield Road, SW10 Ifield Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
King’s Road, SW10 This is a street in the SW10 postcode area
Kings Road, SW10 Kings Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Lamont Road, SW10 Lamont Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Langton Street, SW10 Langton Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Limerston Street, SW10 Limerston Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
London House, SW10 Residential block
Milborne Grove, SW10 Milborne Grove was built between 1851 and 1862.
Milmans Street, SW10 Milmans Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Moravian Place, SW10 Moravian Place is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Mulberry Walk, SW3 Mulberry Walk is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Munro Terrace, SW10 Munro Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Nightingale Place, SW10 Nightingale Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Park Walk, SW10 Park Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Park Walk, SW3 Park Walk is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Raasay Street, SW10 Raasay Street ran from Dartrey Road to Edith Grove.
Redcliffe Gardens, SW10 Redcliffe Gardens began life as Walnut Tree Walk, a pathway running through nurseries and market gardens.
Redcliffe Mews, SW10 Redcliffe Mews is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Redcliffe Place, SW10 Redcliffe Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Redcliffe Road, SW10 Redcliffe Road is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Redcliffe Square, SW10 Redcliffe Square was built as part of the Gunter estate in the 1860s.
Redcliffe Street, SW10 Redcliffe Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Riley Street, SW10 Riley Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Seymour Walk, SW10 Seymour Walk was almost entirely built between the 1790s-1820s in an area then known as Little Chelsea.
Shalcomb Street, SW10 Shalcomb Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Slaidburn Street, SW10 Slaidburn Street is a street in London
South Walk, SW10 South Walk is a road in the SW10 postcode area
St Lukes Church Hall, SW10 St Lukes Church Hall is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Tadema Road, SW10 Tadema Road was named after Lawrence Alma-Tadema
The Plaza, SW10 The Plaza is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
The Vale, SW3 The Vale is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Thorndike Close, SW10 Thorndike Close is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Tregunter Road, SW10 Development began at the east end of Tregunter Road in 1851 and was complete by 1866 at the west end.
Upper Whistler Walk, SW10 This is a street in the SW10 postcode area
Wandon Road, SW6 Wandon Road is a road in the SW6 postcode area
West Road, SW10 West Road is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Westgate Terrace, SW10 Westgate Terrace is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Whistler Walk, SW10 Whistler Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
World’s End Passage, SW10 World’s End Passage is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Worlds End Place, SW10 Worlds End Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Azteca This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Beaufort House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Butchers Hook This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Chelsea Pensioner This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Finborough Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Fox & Pheasant This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Goat This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Riley’s This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Robertos Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sporting Page This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Kings Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Zefi Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Chelsea

Chelsea is an affluent area, bounded to the south by the River Thames.

Its eastern boundary was once defined by the River Westbourne, which is now in a pipe above Sloane Square tube station. The modern eastern boundary is Chelsea Bridge Road and the lower half of Sloane Street, including Sloane Square, along with parts of Belgravia. To the north and northwest, the area fades into Knightsbridge and South Kensington, but it is safe to say that the area north of King’s Road as far northwest as Fulham Road is part of Chelsea.

The word Chelsea originates from the Old English term for chalk and landing place on the river. The first record of the Manor of Chelsea precedes the Domesday Book and records the fact that Thurstan, governor of the King’s Palace during the reign of Edward the Confessor (1042–1066), gave the land to the Abbot and Convent of Westminster. Abbot Gervace subsequently assigned the manor to his mother, and it passed into private ownership. The modern-day Chelsea hosted the Synod of Chelsea in 787 AD.

Chelsea once had a reputation for the manufacture of Chelsea buns (made from a long strip of sweet dough tightly coiled, with currants trapped between the layers, and topped with sugar).

King Henry VIII acquired the manor of Chelsea from Lord Sandys in 1536; Chelsea Manor Street is still extant. Two of King Henry’s wives, Catherine Parr and Anne of Cleves, lived in the Manor House; Princess Elizabeth – the future Queen Elizabeth I – resided there; and Thomas More lived more or less next door at Beaufort House. In 1609 James I established a theological college on the site of the future Chelsea Royal Hospital, which Charles II founded in 1682.

By 1694, Chelsea – always a popular location for the wealthy, and once described as ’a village of palaces’ – had a population of 3000. Even so, Chelsea remained rural and served London to the east as a market garden, a trade that continued until the 19th-century development boom which caused the final absorption of the district into the metropolis.

Chelsea shone, brightly but briefly, in the 1960s Swinging London period and the early 1970s. The Swinging Sixties was defined on King’s Road, which runs the length of the area. The Western end of Chelsea featured boutiques Granny Takes a Trip and The Sweet Shop, the latter of which sold medieval silk velvet caftans, tabards and floor cushions, with many of the cultural cognoscenti of the time being customers, including Keith Richards, Twiggy and many others.

The exclusivity of Chelsea as a result of its high property prices has historically resulted in the term Sloane Ranger to be used to describe its residents. From 2011, Channel 4 broadcast a reality television show called Made in Chelsea, documenting the ’glitzy’ lives of several young people living in Chelsea. Moreover, Chelsea is home to one of the largest communities of Americans living outside of the United States, with 6.53% of Chelsea-residents being born in the United States.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Click here to see Creative Commons images tagged with this road (if applicable)
The Dancing Platform at Cremorne Gardens (1864) In the 17th century, Chelsea Farm was formed and the area was used for market gardening plots, supplying central London. In 1778, Lord Cremorne bought Chelsea Farm and Cremorne House was built. In 1830 Charles Random de Berenger, a colourful character implicated in financial fraud during the Napoleonic War, purchased Cremorne House. He was a keen sportsman and opened a sports club know as Cremorne Stadium for ‘skilful and manly exercise’ including shooting, sailing, archery and fencing. In 1846, De Berenger’s Cremorne Stadium was transformed into a pleasure garden which became a popular and noisy place of entertainment. The entertainment included a diverse range of activities including concerts, fireworks, balloon ascents, galas and theatre.
Credit: Phoebus Levin
TUM image id: 1526047056
Licence:
Elm Park Gardens
TUM image id: 1573064988
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The Dancing Platform at Cremorne Gardens (1864) In the 17th century, Chelsea Farm was formed and the area was used for market gardening plots, supplying central London. In 1778, Lord Cremorne bought Chelsea Farm and Cremorne House was built. In 1830 Charles Random de Berenger, a colourful character implicated in financial fraud during the Napoleonic War, purchased Cremorne House. He was a keen sportsman and opened a sports club know as Cremorne Stadium for ‘skilful and manly exercise’ including shooting, sailing, archery and fencing. In 1846, De Berenger’s Cremorne Stadium was transformed into a pleasure garden which became a popular and noisy place of entertainment. The entertainment included a diverse range of activities including concerts, fireworks, balloon ascents, galas and theatre.
Credit: Phoebus Levin
Licence:


Elm Park Gardens
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Boys and girls kick a ball around a quiet Uverdale Road, Chelsea (early 1960s). The road is now filled with parked cars and a gated playground. Just down the road from major bomb sites, this was one of a cluster of streets that became a ghost town in the wake of the Blitz
Credit: John Bignell
Licence:


Chelsea Farm in the days of Countess Huntindon
Credit: Kensington and Chelsea Libraries
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Lots Road Power Station (2005).
Credit: Adrian Pingstone
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Graffiti, Raasay Street, Chelsea (1969).
Credit: Roger Perry
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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