Decca Studios

Recording studio in/near West Hampstead, existed between 1937 and the 1980s

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Decca Studios

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Recording studio · * · ·
JANUARY
13
2015

Decca Studios was a recording facility in Broadhurst Gardens.

The Beatles failed their audition with Decca Records here on 1 January 1962, and subsequently signed with Parlophone.

The site being the Town Hall originally, the building in Broadhurst Gardens London NW6 started off as The Falcon Works, an engineering company and was converted to a recording studios in 1933 for Crystalate Records. In 1937 the company was bought out by Decca and Broadhurst Gardens became the company's third and final home base. The building housed three main studios.

Many popular songs and albums were recorded at Decca Studios (for example, John Mayall's 1968 Blues from Laurel Canyon and five albums by the Moody Blues). Britain's leading Big Band, Ted Heath (bandleader) and his Orchestra recorded a succession of outstanding big band jazz records at Broadhurst Gardens for Decca during the band's peak years from 1945 until Heath's death in 1969. David Bowie recorded his first single, Liza Jane, at the studio in 1964. The studios also saw the formation of the original Fleetwood Mac, under the aegis of then-Bluesbreakers guitarist Peter Green, after John Mayall bought him studio time as a birthday present.

Marmalade recorded most of their Decca hits in Studio 2, including Reflections of My Life.

The Zombies recorded She's Not There at the facility.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


The Beatles at Decca

The Beatles at Decca

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Cannon Stream The Cannon Stream was, before it was sent underground, a tributary of the Westbourne River.
Canterbury House In the last half of the nineteenth century, a white house called Canterbury was built on the then southern fringes of West End.
Decca Studios Decca Studios was a recording facility in Broadhurst Gardens.
Hampstead Cricket Club Hampstead Cricket Club moved to its Lymington Road site in 1877.
Jacksfield Jacksfield was one of the smaller but well-documented copyhold estates in the West Hampstead area.
Kilburn Grange Park Kilburn Grange Park is a three hectare open space adjacent to Kilburn High Road.
Lauriston Lodge Lauriston Lodge, now the site of Dene Mansions, was a large house in West Hampstead.
Oaklands Hall On the west side of West End Lane, Charles Spain bought 5 acres and between 1829 and 1838 built York Villa.
Sandwell House Sandwell House was owned by three generations of the Wachter family.
The Grange The Grange was a large mansion situated on Kilburn High Road until the turn of the twentieth century.
The Railway The Railway pub is a standard Victorian pub with a musical secret.
Treherne House Treherne House was built in the mid eighteenth century,
West End House West End House, once in open countryside, became surrounded by railways.
West End Park West End Park was created from fields known as the 'Little Estate'.

NEARBY STREETS
Ariel Road, NW6 Ariel Road was formed from the 1885 combination of Ariel Street and Spencer Terrace.
Banister Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Beswick Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Billy Fury Way, NW3 Billy Fury Way is a road in the NW3 postcode area
Blackburn Road, NW6 Blackburn Road is a cul-de-sac off of West End Lane.
Broadhurst Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Broadhurst Gardens, NW6 Broadhurst Gardens is in West Hampstead, NW6
Broadwell Parade, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Canfield Gardens, NW6 Canfield Gardens was first laid out in 1881.
Cleve Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Compayne Gardens, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cotleigh Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Crown Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Dennington Park Road, NW6 About 1881 Dennington Park Road was constructed on the line of Sweetbriar Walk, the old path to Lauriston Lodge.
Doulton Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Dynham Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Fawley Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Gascony Avenue, NW6 Gascony Avenue is an east-west road lying both sides of Kingsgate Road, NW6.
Gladys Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Grangeway, NW6 Grangeway, NW6 lies off of Messina Avenue.
Hemstal Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Highfield Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Hilltop Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Iverson Road, NW6 The first part of Iverson Road, NW6 was laid out in 1872.
Kingdon Road, NW6 Kingdon Road connects Sumatra Road and Dennington Park Road.
Kylemore Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Liddell Road, NW6 Liddell Road was named after an old West Hampstead estate.
Linstead Street, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Lithos Road, NW3 Lithos Road is a part of the NW3 postal area which lies west of the Finchley Road.
Lowfield Road, NW6 Lowfield Road is the northern extension of Kingsgate Road, NW6.
Lymington Road, NW6 Lymington Road is a street in London NW6
Maygrove Road, NW6 Maygrove Road runs between the Edgware Road and Iverson Road, NW6
Medley Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Messina Avenue, NW6 Messina Avenue stretches from West End Lane over to Kilburn High Road.
Minton Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Pandora Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Priory Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Rosemont Road, NW3 Rosemont Road is a street in Hampstead.
Rowntree Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Sandwell Crescent, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Sherriff Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Solent Road, NW6 Solent Road is a street in West Hampstead.
Spode Walk, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Sumatra Road, NW6 Sumatra Road, NW6 dates from the 1870s.
West End Lane, NW6 West End Lane is the main road running through West Hampstead.
West Hampstead Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Woodchurch Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Worcester Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
West Hampstead Overgound
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West End Park, 1870s
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19th century cricket
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Hampstead Synagogue
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Sandwell House
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The Beatles at Decca
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The Railway, West Hampstead
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Billy Fury Way
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