St Augustine’s Church of England High School

School in/near Kilburn Park, existing between the 1870s and now

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St Augustine’s Church of England High School

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School · * · NW6 ·
August
13
2017

St Augustine’s Church of England High School is a Voluntary Aided Church of England comprehensive school in the West London borough of Westminster, Kilburn.

The school is a Science College and has a sixth form. St Augustine of Canterbury is the patron saint of the school. It is located adjacent to its affiliated primary school and parish church St Augustine’s Church.

The school traces its origins to Mother Emily Ayckbowm, who also founded the Community of the Sisters of the Church, working in conjunction with the first vicar of the nearby St. Augustine’s church. The school was opened on 16 May 1870 in Andover Place with seven students, with specifically the High School opening in 1884 as an all boys’ secondary school; the present division into primary and secondary schools being complete by 1951.

In 1969, the present school buildings were opened, with St. Augustine’s High School becoming a Church of England comprehensive school.

In February 2009, the school received a nearly £20 million investment under the BSF programme for schools, which entailed a major refurbishment providing a new building and more space for pupils and staff. The work was completed in late 2011.

In May 2010 the school was given a new, state of the art sports centre used by both the school and the local community.


Main source: Wikipedia
Further citations and sources




NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Bayswater Rivulet The Bayswater Rivulet was the original name for the Westbourne River
Kilburn Bridge Kilburn Bridge once marked the spot where the Edgware Road crossed the River Westbourne.
Kilburn Bridge Farm Kilburn Bridge Farm stood beside Watling Street until the late 1830s.
Kilburn High Road What was Watling Street in earlier times, became Edgware Road and finally Kilburn High Road.
Kilburn Library Kilburn Library on Kilburn High Road is one of two sites called Kilburn Library, the other being in Salusbury Road, NW6.
Kilburn Park Kilburn Park station was opened on 31 January 1915 as the temporary terminus of the Bakerloo line’s extension from Paddington.
Kilburn Park Farm Kilburn Park Farm was situated almost opposite the Red Lion along the Edgware Road.
Kilburn Wells Kilburn Wells. a medicinal spring, existed between 1714 and the 1860s.
Red Lion The Red Lion was situated at 34 Kilburn High Road.
St Augustine’s Church of England High School St Augustine’s Church of England High School is a Voluntary Aided Church of England comprehensive school in the West London borough of Westminster, Kilburn.
St Augustine’s, Kilburn St Augustine’s was founded by Richard Carr Kirkpatrick in the Anglo-Catholic tradition in 1870 and listed as a Grade I building by Historic England.
The Old Bell The (Old) Bell is a very old Kilburn Pub.

NEARBY STREETS
Abbey Road, NW8 Abbey Road, after which the Beatles album was named, runs from St John's Wood to West Hampstead.
Addison Court, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Alexandra Mews, NW8 Alexandra Mews existed between the 1850s and the 1960s.
Algernon Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Alpha Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Andover Place, NW6 Andover Place runs between Kilburn Park Road and Carlton Vale.
Andover Place, W9 Andover Place is a street in Maida Vale.
Belgrave Gardens, NW8 Belgrave Gardens was originally the east side of Bolton Road.
Bolton Road, NW8 What is now Bolton Road began life as Ordnance Terrace in 1858.
Brondesbury Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Brondesbury Villas, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cambridge Avenue, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cambridge Court, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cambridge Gardens, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cambridge Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Canterbury Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Canterbury Terrace, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Canterbury Works, NW6 Canterbury Works is a road in the NW6 postcode area
Carlton Vale, NW6 Carlton Vale runs from the Edgware Road to Kilburn Lane.
Carlton Vale, W9 Carlton Vale is a street in Maida Vale.
Cathedral Walk, NW6 Cathedral Walk is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Charteris Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Chichester Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Coventry Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Dibdin House, W9 Residential block
Goldsmith Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Gorefield Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Granville Road, NW6 Granville Road, NW6 was formerly Pembroke Road.
Greville Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Greville Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Greville Place, W9 Greville Place is a street in Maida Vale.
Greville Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Hansel Road, NW6 Hansel Road is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Hazelmere Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Helmsdale House, NW6 Residential block
Hermit Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Hillside Close, NW8 Hillside Close is a cul-de-sac off of Carlton Hill.
Holtham Road, NW8 Holtham Road disappeared when replaced by the Abbey Road Estate development.
Kilburn High Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Kilburn Park Road, W9 Kilburn Park Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Kilburn Place, NW6 Kilburn Place was originally Providence Place.
Kilburn Priory, NW6 Kilburn Priory is now a road - - it was once the site of a real priory
Kilburn Priory, NW8 Kilburn Priory is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Kilburn Vale, NW6 Kilburn Vale leads to the Kilburn Vale estate.
Langtry Road, NW8 Langtry Road is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Langtry Walk, NW8 Langtry Walk was named for Lily Langtry.
Mallard Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Manor Mews, NW6 Manor Mews is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Maple Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Masefield House, NW6 Residential block
Mortimer Crescent, NW6 Mortimer Crescent is a notable street in Kilburn, full of literary connections.
Mortimer Crescent, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Mortimer Place, NW6 Mortimer Place can be found in Kilburn, NW6.
Nelson Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Neville Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Neville Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Oxford Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Peel Precinct, NW6 Peel Precinct is a road in the NW6 postcode area
Pentland Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Plaza Parade, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Princess Road, NW6 Princess Road was once known as Alexandra Road.
Prospect Place, NW6 Prospect Place was a group of houses built fronting Edgware Road south of the junction with West End Lane.
Randolph Gardens, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Regents Plaza, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Rudolph Road, NW6 Rudolph Road is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Saltram Crescent, W9 Saltram Crescent is a street in Maida Vale.
Springfield Lane, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Springfield Walk, NW6 Springfield Walk has a set of very old steps that give access to Kilburn Priory.
Stafford Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Torridon House, NW6 Residential block
Victoria Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Wells Court, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Woodville Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Kilburn Wells
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Kilburn Park Farm
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Mortimer Place, NW6
TUM image id: 1492961898
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