One Ropemaker Street, EC2Y

Road in/near City of London

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Road · City of London · EC2Y ·
JANUARY
1
2000

One Ropemaker Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.

A lot of the street information research on this website is academic in nature - from university research, the Survey of London, British History Online, borough conservation areas and more. Occasionally, the Hive Mind comes up trumps - these derivations come from discoveries on the Wikipedia made during 2019 which is feeding into the project.

If we find any derivations dubious here, we remove them. With that proviso, the TUM project provides them here for your enjoyment...

A-B-C D-E-F G-H-I J-K-L M-N-O P-Q-R S T-U-V W-X-Y-Z

Sackville Street - after Captain Edward Sackville, tenant of a house on the west side of the street in 1675; it was formerly known as Stone Conduit Close [Mayfair]
Saffron Hill – these used to be the gardens of the Bishops of Ely, where they grew saffron [Hatton Garden]
Saffron Street – these used to be the gardens of the Bishops of Ely, where they grew saffron [Hatton Garden]
Salisbury Court and Salisbury Square – after the London house of the bishops of Salisbury, located here prior to the Reformation [City of London]
Salisbury Place – after the Salisbury brothers (Isaac, John and Thomas), local 18th century builders [Marylebone]
Salisbury Street – Broadley Street near here was formerly Earl Street, and the surrounding streets were given earldom-related names in the early 19th century; this was named for the Earls of Salisbury [Lisson Grove]
Salter’s Hall Court – after the former hall of the Worshipful Company of Salters, destroyed in the Blitz [City of London]
Salters Court – after the former hall of the Worshipful Company of Salters, moved in 1600 [City of London]
Sancroft Street – after William Sancroft, 79th Archbishop of Canterbury, by association with the nearby Lambeth Palace [Vauxhall]
Sanctuary Street – as the local mint formerly here claimed the local area as a sanctuary for debtors [Southwark]
Sandell Street – after one Mr Sandell, who owned wharehouses here in the 1860s [Waterloo]
Sandwich Street – after Sandwich in Kent, home county of local 16th century landowner Andrew Judd [Bloomsbury]
Sandy’s Row – after a builder or property owner of this name [City of London]
Sans Walk – after Edward Sans, named in 1893 as he was then oldest member of the local parish vestry [Clerkenwell]
Saracens Head Yard – after a former inn of this name [City of London]
Sardinia Street – after the embassy of the Kingdom of Sardinia and its associated chapel, formerly located on the site of a nearby demolished street of the same name [Holborn]
Saunders Road Uxbridge Street built near the site of the former RAF Uxbridge, and named after an air marshal in the Second World War. Hugh Saunders was Chief of Staff for the Royal New Zealand Air Force.
Savage Gardens – after Thomas Savage, who owned a house here in the 1620s [City of London]
Savile Row – after Dorothy Savile, Countess of Burlington and Countess of Cork, wife of Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington, local landowner [Mayfair]
Savoy Buildings – the former site of the Savoy Palace, built for Peter II, Count of Savoy in 1245 [Strand]
Savoy Court – the former site of the Savoy Palace, built for Peter II, Count of Savoy in 1245 [Strand]
Savoy Hill – the former site of the Savoy Palace, built for Peter II, Count of Savoy in 1245 [Strand]
Savoy Place Westminster Peter II, Count of Savoy Gave his name to the Savoy Palace, which stood on the site of the road
Savoy Row – the former site of the Savoy Palace, built for Peter II, Count of Savoy in 1245 [Strand]
Savoy Steps – the former site of the Savoy Palace, built for Peter II, Count of Savoy in 1245 [Strand]
Savoy Street – the former site of the Savoy Palace, built for Peter II, Count of Savoy in 1245 [Strand]
Savoy Way – the former site of the Savoy Palace, built for Peter II, Count of Savoy in 1245 [Strand]
Sawyer Street – after Bob Sawyer, a character in the novel The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens, by association with Dickens Square [Southwark]
Scoresby Street – unknown; formerly York Street [Southwark]
Scotland Place – site of a house used by visiting monarchs of Scotland until the 13th century [Westminster]
Scovell Crescent – after the Scovells, local business family [Southwark]
Scovell Road – after the Scovells, local business family [Southwark]
Seaford Street – thought to be named for Seaford in Sussex [Bloomsbury]
Seaforth Place – after Seaforth in Scotland, by association with the London Scottish (regiment) formerly bases nearby [Westminster]
Sebastian Street – after Lewis Sebastian, former Master of the Worshipful Company of Skinners and chairman of the governors of Northampton Polytechnic (now City University) [Clerkenwell]
Secker Street - after Thomas Secker, Archbishop of Canterbury 1758-68, by connection with the nearby Lambeth Palace [Waterloo]
Sedding Street – after John Dando Sedding, designer of the nearby Holy Trinity, Sloane Street church [Belgravia]
Sedley Place – named after Angelo Sedley, local 19th century furniture salesman [Mayfair]
Seething Lane – formerly Shyvethenestrat and Sivethenelane, deriving from Old English sifetha, meaning chaff/siftings, after the local corn threshing [City of London]
Sekforde Street – after Thomas Seckford, Elizabethan court official, who left land nearby in his will for the building of an almshouse [Clerkenwell]
Selwyn Avenue Richmond upon Thames William Selwyn Owned, and lived near, the land on which the road was later built; contributed to the founding of nearby church St John the Divine, Richmond.
Semley Place – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned a property called Semley [Belgravia]
Serjeants Inn – after the former Serjeant's Inn located here before the Blitz [City of London]
Serle Street – after Henry Serle, who built the street in the 1680s [Holborn]
Sermon Lane – thought to be after Adam la Sarmoner, 13th century landowner [City of London]
Serpentine Walk - as it leads to The Serpentine lake in Hyde Park [Belgravia]
Seven Dials and Seven Dials Court – after the seven dials on the sundial column, and the seven adjoining streets; laid out by Thomas Neal in 1693 [Covent Garden]
Seven Dials WC2 - The work of building Seven Dials had begun in 1693, on what was then called Cock-and-pie Fields taken from a nearby inn. Thomas Neale undertook the task of making a great junction, and, in the centre he erected a pillar with seven dials, one for each of the streets at the junction. In 1733 the pillar was taken down as there was believed to be a fortune lodged at the base, but no money was found, and the pillar was transported to Weybridge in Surrey. Good news it was returned to the original spot just a couple of years ago.
Seville Street – unknown; it was formerly Charles Street, after Charles Lowndes of the local landowning Lowndes family [Belgravia]
Seward Street – after Edward Seward, who owned a dyeworks here in the 18th century [Finsbury]
Seymour Gardens Hounslow Nearby streets have a Henry VIII/Elizabeth I connection. Elizabeth spent part of her childhood at Hanworth Manor nearby. The third wife of King Henry VIII.
Seymour Mews, Seymour Place and Seymour Street – after Anne Seymour, mother of Henry William Portman, and through whom he inherited the estate [Marylebone]
Shaftesbury Avenue Westminster Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury Shaftesbury was an active philanthropist, and as a Member of Parliament he was responsible for several reforming acts designed to alleviate the suffering of the poor. The new Avenue replaced slum housing, and was finished in the year of his death, 1886.
Shafts Court – named after a maypole (or ‘shaft’) that formerly stood nearby at the junction of Leadenhall Street and St Mary Axe [City of London]
Shand Street – after Augustus Shand, member of local Board of Works in the late 19th century; it was formerly College Street, by association with the nearby Magdalen Street [Southwark]
Shaver’s Place – after Simon Osbaldeston, who built a gaming house here in the early 17th century. As Osbaldeston was formerly barber to Lord Chamberlain, local wits coined this name in jest at the ‘shaving’ going on at the games house [Soho]
Sheldon Street Croydon Gilbert Sheldon Archbishop of Canterbury (1663-1677) who lived at Croydon Palace, and is buried in Croydon Minster
Shelton Street – after William Shelton, who provided money for a local charitable school for the poor on nearby Parker Street in his will in the 17th century [Covent Garden]
Shepherd Close – after Edward Shepherd, local builder in the 18th century; Shepherd Place was built by his brother John Shepherd [Mayfair]
Shepherd Market W1 - Builder/architect, Edward Shepherd, who had a hand in the building of Grosvenor and Cavendish Squares. He obtained permission to build a cattle market in May Fair in 1738, where every May a large fair was held around the cattle market. The annual fair gave its name to the area of Mayfair.
Shepherd Place – after Edward Shepherd, local builder in the 18th century; Shepherd Place was built by his brother John Shepherd [Mayfair]
Shepherd Street – after Edward Shepherd, local builder in the 18th century; Shepherd Place was built by his brother John Shepherd [Mayfair]
Sheraton Street – after Thomas Sheraton, noted furniture maker of the 18th century, who lived nearby [Soho]
Sherborne Lane – earlier Shirebourne Lane, alteration of the Medieval Shitteborelane, in reference to a public privy here [City of London]
Sherlock Mews – after the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, who lived on Baker Street [Marylebone]
Sherwood Street – corruption of ‘Sherard’; Francis Sherard was a local developer in the late 17th century [Soho]
Shillibeer Place – after George Shillibeer, owner of a local coaching business in the 19th century [Marylebone]
Ship Tavern Passage – after the nearby Ship tavern [City of London]
Shoe Lane – as this lane formerly led to a shoe-shaped landholding/field [City of London]
Short Street – after local early 19th century carpenter Samuel Short [Waterloo]
Shorts Gardens – after the Short family, who owned a house near here in the 17th century; it was formerly Queen Street [Covent Garden]
Shouldham Street – after Molyneux Shuldham, 18th century naval officer [Marylebone]
Shroton Street – for the Baker family, assistants of local landowners the Portmans, who owned land in Shroton, Dorset [Lisson Grove]
Sicilian Avenue – this Italianate arch is built from Sicilian marble [Bloomsbury]
Siddons Lane – after 19th century actress Sarah Siddons, who lived nearby at Clarence Gate [Lisson Grove]
Sidmouth Mews – either for Sidmouth in Devon, then a fashionable resort town or Prime Minister Henry Addington, 1st Viscount Sidmouth [Bloomsbury]
Sidmouth Street – either for Sidmouth in Devon, then a fashionable resort town or Prime Minister Henry Addington, 1st Viscount Sidmouth [Bloomsbury]
Silk Street – thought to be named for its late 18th century builder, or the silk trade formerly located here [City of London]
Silver Place – unknown, possibly by association with the nearby Golden Square [Soho]
Simon Milton Square – after Simon Milton, late 20th century/early 21st century Conservative politician [Victoria]
Sise Lane – as it formerly led to St Benet Sherehog church, which was dedicated to St Osyth (later corrupted to Sythe, then Sise) [City of London]
Skinner Street – after the Worshipful Company of Skinners, who owned much of the surrounding land when the street was built in the 1810s [Clerkenwell]
Skinners Lane – after the fur trade that was former prevalent here; it was formerly Maiden Lane, after a local inn or shop [City of London]
Slingsby Place – after Sir William Slingsby, who purchased this land in the 17th century [Covent Garden]
Sloane Gardens – after Hans Sloane, local landowner when this area was built up in the 18th century [Belgravia]
Sloane Square Kensington and Chelsea Hans Sloane His heirs owned the land on which the square and nearby Sloane Street are built.
Sloane Street – after Hans Sloane, local landowner when this area was built up in the 18th century [Belgravia]
Sloane Terrace – after Hans Sloane, local landowner when this area was built up in the 18th century [Belgravia]
Smart’s Place – probably from William Smart, a carpenter who lived near here in the early 18th century [Covent Garden]
Smith Square Westminster Sir James Smith/the Smith Family Owners of the land on which the square was built, c. 1726
Smithfield Street and West Smithfield – derives from the Old English ‘smooth-field’, a series of fields outside the City walls [City of London]
Smokehouse Yard – after the bacon stoves formerly located here [Farringdon]
Snow Hill and Snow Hill Court – formerly Snore Hill or Snowrehill, exact meaning unknown [City of London]
Soho Square – Soho was in times past open hunting ground, and it thought to have gained its name from the hunting cry of ‘soho!’; the square was formerly King Square, thought to be in honour of Charles II [Soho]
Soho Street – Soho was in times past open hunting ground, and it thought to have gained its name from the hunting cry of ‘soho!’; the square was formerly King Square, thought to be in honour of Charles II [Soho]
Sopwith Way Kingston upon Thames Thomas Sopwith Aviation pioneer who set up a factory near the east end of the road, where his earliest aircraft were made.
South Audley Street – after Mary Davies, heiress to Hugh Audley, who married Sir Thomas Grosvenor, thereby letting the local land fall into the Grosvenors' ownership [Mayfair]
South Carriage Drive – after the carriage which formerly used this path [Belgravia]
South Eaton Place - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), whose family seat is Eaton Hall, Cheshire [Belgravia]
South Lambeth Place - refers to a harbour where lambs were either shipped from or to. It is formed from the Old English 'lamb' and 'hythe'. [Vauxhall]
South Molton Lane – unknown; South Molton Lane was formerly Poverty Lane [Mayfair]
South Molton Street – unknown; South Molton Lane was formerly Poverty Lane [Mayfair]
South Place and South Place Mews – named as it is south of Moorfields [City of London]
South Square – from its location in the south of Gray's Inn [Holborn]
South Street – after its location as the southern-most street on the Grosvenor estate [Mayfair]
Southampton Buildings – after Southampton House which formerly stood here, built for the bishops of Lincoln in the 12th century and later acquired by the earls of Southampton [City of London]
Southampton Buildings WC1 - Here once stood the house of the 4th Earl of Southampton son of Shakespeare's patron. In 1638 he replaced the house with tenements on the land now known as Southampton Buildings, he moved to a new mansion in Bloomsbury named Southampton House, built where Southampton Place now stands.
Southampton Place – Southampton House, home of the earls of Southampton, formerly stood here in the 16th century [Bloomsbury]
Southampton Row – Southampton House, home of the earls of Southampton, formerly stood here in the 16th century [Holborn]
Southampton Row – Southampton House, home of the earls of Southampton, formerly stood here in the 16th century. Particularly after Thomas Wriothesley, 4th Earl of Southampton Landowner. [Bloomsbury]
Southampton Street – after the earls of Southampton, who owned Southampton House in Bloomsbury in the 16th century; Edward Russell, 3rd Earl of Bedford and local landowner married a daughter and heiress of the Southamptons, and this street was named in her/their honour [Covent Garden]
Southampton Street Camden Thomas Wriothesley, 4th Earl of Southampton Landowner.
Southwark Bridge – the name Suthriganaweorc or Suthringa geweorche is recorded for the area in the 10th-century Anglo-Saxon document known as the Burghal Hidage and means fort of the men of Surrey or the defensive work of the men of Surrey. Southwark is recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book as Sudweca. The name means southern defensive work and is formed from the Old English suth and weorc. The southern location is in reference to the City of London to the north, Southwark being at the southern end of London Bridge [Southwark]
Southwark Bridge Road – the name Suthriganaweorc or Suthringa geweorche is recorded for the area in the 10th-century Anglo-Saxon document known as the Burghal Hidage and means fort of the men of Surrey or the defensive work of the men of Surrey. Southwark is recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book as Sudweca. The name means southern defensive work and is formed from the Old English suth and weorc. The southern location is in reference to the City of London to the north, Southwark being at the southern end of London Bridge [Southwark]
Southwark Street – the name Suthriganaweorc or Suthringa geweorche is recorded for the area in the 10th-century Anglo-Saxon document known as the Burghal Hidage and means fort of the men of Surrey or the defensive work of the men of Surrey. Southwark is recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book as Sudweca. The name means southern defensive work and is formed from the Old English suth and weorc. The southern location is in reference to the City of London to the north, Southwark being at the southern end of London Bridge [Southwark]
Spafield Street – after a former spa on this site which closed in 1776 [Clerkenwell]
Spanish Place – nearby Hertford House on Manchester Square was formerly home to the Spanish ambassador [Marylebone]
Speed Highwalk – after John Speed, Stuart-era mapmaker, who is buried in the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate [City of London]
Speedy Place – after the Speedy family, landlords of the former nearby pub the Golden Boot [Bloomsbury]
Spencer Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, one of whom was cousins with Spencer Perceval
Spenser Street – after the poet Edmund Spenser, who lived nearby [Westminster]
Spitalfields E1 - In 1197, Mr Walter Brune, a Londoner, founded in the fields just east of Bishopsgate a large hospital for poor brethren of the order of St. Austin; Spring Gardens Westminster After the 17th century pleasure grounds of this name which formerly lay on this site; they were closed in 1660
Spring Gardens – after the 17th century pleasure grounds of this name which formerly lay on this site; they were closed in 1660 [St James's]
Spurgeon Street – after Charles Spurgeon, noted Victorian-era preacher [Southwark]
St Agnes Well – after an ancient well thought to have been located about 200 metres to the east, at the junction of Old Street and Great Eastern Street. Remnants of the well can be found within Old Street station. [Finsbury]

St Albans Court – after the adjacent St Alban, Wood Street church, of which only the tower now remains [City of London]
St Alban's Street – after Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of Saint Albans, 17th century politician and local landowner [St James's]
St Alphage Garden – after the adjacent St Alphege London Wall church, now surviving only in ruins [City of London]
St Alphage Highwalk – after the adjacent St Alphege London Wall church, now surviving only in ruins [City of London]
St Andrew Street – after the adjacent St Andrew’s Church [City of London]
St Andrew’s Hill – after the adjacent St Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe church [City of London]
St Andrew’s Place – after the later William IV, Duke of St Andrews, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
St Ann’s Lane – after a former chapel dedicated to St Anne that formerly stood here [Westminster]
St Ann’s Street – after a former chapel dedicated to St Anne that formerly stood here [Westminster]
St Anne's Court – after the surrounding parish of St Anne’s and the church, named after Saint Anne [Soho]
St Anselm’s Place – former site of St Anselm’s church, demolished 1938 [Mayfair]
St Barnabas Street – after the nearby Church of St Barnabas, Pimlico [Belgravia]
St Benet’s Place – after the former St Benet Gracechurch which stood near here; destroyed in the Great Fire, its replacement was then demolished in 1868 [City of London]
St Botolph Row – after the adjacent St Botolph's Aldgate church [City of London]
St Botolph Street – after the adjacent St Botolph's Aldgate church [City of London]
St Bride Street – after the adjacent St Bride's Church [City of London]
St Bride’s Avenue – after the adjacent St Bride's Church [City of London]
St Bride’s Passage – after the adjacent St Bride's Church [City of London]
St Chad’s Place – after the nearby St Chad’s well, reputed to be a medieval holy well; St Chad was a 7th-century bishop [Clerkenwell]
St Chad’s Street – after the nearby St Chad’s well, reputed to be a medieval holy well; St Chad was a 7th-century bishop [Bloomsbury]
St Christopher’s Place – Octavia Hill, social reformer, cleared the slums of this area and named it in honour of St Christopher; formerly it was Barrett's Court, after Thomas Barret, local 18th century landowner [Marylebone]
St Clare Street – after a former church/convent here of the Little Sisters of St Clare [City of London]
St Clement’s Court – after the adjacent St Clement's, Eastcheap church [City of London]
St Cross Street – originally Cross Street, as it crossed land belonging to the Hatton family; the ‘St’ was added in 1937 to avoid confusion with numerous streets of the same name [Hatton Garden]
St Dunstan’s Alley – after the former St Dunstan-in-the-East church, largely destroyed in the Blitz and now a small garden [City of London]
St Dunstan’s Court – after the nearby St Dunstan-in-the-West church [City of London]
St Dunstan’s Hill – after the former St Dunstan-in-the-East church, largely destroyed in the Blitz and now a small garden [City of London]
St Dunstan’s Lane – after the former St Dunstan-in-the-East church, largely destroyed in the Blitz and now a small garden [City of London]
St Erkenwald Road Barking and Dagenham Saint Erkenwald Saint and Bishop of London who founded Barking Abbey to the west of the road
St Ermin’s Hill – thought to be a corruption of Hermit Hill, or possibly after St Ermin/Armel, 6th century monk [Westminster]
St George Street – originally George Street, after George I, reigning monarch when the street was built; the ‘St’ was later added to link it to the nearby St George’s church [Mayfair]
St George’s Circus – as this area was formerly called St George’s Fields, after St George the Martyr, Southwark church; the circus opened in 1770 [Southwark]
St George’s Drive, St George’s Square and St George’s Square Mews – after the manor of St George’s, Hanover Square which originally stretched to the Thames, and was named for George I [Victoria]
St George’s Mews – as this area was formerly called St George’s Fields, after St George the Martyr, Southwark church; the circus opened in 1770 [Lambeth]
St George’s Road – as this area was formerly called St George’s Fields, after St George the Martyr, Southwark church; the circus opened in 1770 [Lambeth]
St George's Circus – as this area was formerly called St George’s Fields, after St George the Martyr, Southwark church; the circus opened in 1770 [Waterloo]
St Georges Court – after the former St George Botolph Lane church nearby, demolished in 1904 [City of London]
St Giles Circus – after St Giles Hospital, a leper hospital founded by Matilda of Scotland, wife of Henry I in 1117. St Giles was an 8th-century hermit in Provence who was crippled in a hunting accident and later became patron saint of cripples and lepers. Circus is a British term for a road junction [Fitzrovia]
St Giles High Street – after St Giles Hospital, a leper hospital founded by Matilda of Scotland, wife of Henry I in 1117. St Giles was an 8th-century hermit in Provence who was crippled in a hunting accident and later became patron saint of cripples and lepers. Circus is a British term for a road junction [Fitzrovia]
St Giles Passage – after St Giles Hospital, a leper hospital founded by Matilda of Scotland, wife of Henry I in 1117. St Giles was an 8th-century hermit in Provence who was crippled in a hunting accident and later became patron saint of cripples and lepers. Circus is a British term for a road junction [Fitzrovia]Scala Street – after the Scala theatre which formerly stood here [Fitzrovia]
St Giles Terrace – after the adjacent St Giles-without-Cripplegate church [City of London]
St Helen’s Place – after the adjacent St Helen's Church, Bishopsgate and former priory here of the same name [City of London]
St Helena Street – believed to be named after St Helena, in commemoration of Napoleon’s exile there in 1815 [Clerkenwell]
St James’s Market, St James’s Place, St James's Square, St James’s Street and Little St James’s Street – the site of St James’s Palace was originally the site of St James’s leper hospital in the Middle Ages, named after James, son of Zebedee [St James's]
St James’s Passage – after St James Duke's Place church, demolished 1874 [City of London]
St James’s Walk – after the adjacent St James's Church, Clerkenwell [Clerkenwell]
St John Square – after the Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem, who set up their English headquarters here in the 12th century [Clerkenwell]
St John Street – after the Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem, who set up their English headquarters here in the 12th century [Clerkenwell]
St John’s Lane, St John’s Path, St John’s Place, St John’s Square and St John Street – after the Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem, who set up their English headquarters here in the 12th century [Farringdon]
St John’s Wood Road – this land was in Medieval times owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem [Lisson Grove]
St John's Wood NW8 - Part of the forest of Middlesex now known as St Johns Wood was in the manor of Lilestone (Lisson). It was in the reign of Edward I that a gift of the woods was made from Otho, son of William de Lileston to the Knights Templers, and later passed to the Knights Hospitallers of St Johns of Jerusalem, when it became St Johns Wood and has so remained ever since.
St Katherine’s Precinct – after the former Anglican chapel of St Katharine's Hospital, which retains its original dedication to Saint Katharine, and was built in 1826-8 (now the Danish Church) [Regent’s Park]
St Katherine’s Row – after the St Katherine Coleman church, demolished in 1926 [City of London]
St Luke’s Close – after the adjacent St Luke Old Street church [Finsbury]
St Margaret Street – after the nearby St Margaret's, Westminster [Westminster]
St Margaret’s Close – after the adjacent St Margaret Lothbury church [City of London]
St Margaret's Court – named for the former St Margaret’s church here; it was for a period known as Fishmonger’s Alley, as it belonged to the Worshipful Company of Fishmongers [Southwark]
St Martin’s Court, St Martin’s Courtyard and Saint Martin’s Lane, St Martin-in-the-Fields Church Path and St Martin’s Place – after St Martin-in-the-Fields church adjacent [Covent Garden]
St Martin’s le Grand – after a former church of this name here, demolished in 1538 [City of London]
St Martin’s Place – named after St Martin-in-the-Fields church [Soho]
St Martin’s Street – named after St Martin-in-the-Fields church [Soho]
St Mary at Hill – after the St Mary-at-Hill church here [City of London]
St Mary Axe – after the former Church of St Mary Axe here, demolished in the 1500s [City of London]
St Mary's Gardens – after the parish of St Mary’s, Lambeth [Lambeth]
St Matthew Street – after St Matthew's Church, Westminster; it was formerly Duck Lane, as ducks were reared here [Westminster]
St Michael’s Alley – after the adjacent St Michael, Cornhill church [City of London]
St Mildred’s Court – after the former St Mildred, Poultry church, demolished 1872 [City of London]
St Olaf Stairs – probably for the former St Olave’s grammar school located here [Southwark]
St Olave’s Court – after the former St Olave Old Jewry church here, of which only the tower remains [City of London]
St Olave's Gardens – after the local parish of Southwark St Olave [Lambeth]
St Oswulf Street - as this areas was formerly part of the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex; Oswulf was Saxon-era chief here [Westminster]
St Paul’s Churchyard – after the adjacent St Paul’s Cathedral; the churchyard was formerly far more extensive, but has since been built over [City of London]
St Peter’s Alley – after the adjacent St Peter upon Cornhill church [City of London]
St Swithins Lane – after the former St Swithin, London Stone, largely destroyed in the Blitz and later demolished [City of London]
St Thomas Street – after St Thomas’ Hospital, formerly located here [Southwark]
St Vincent Street – after the nearby school founded by the Sisters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul [Marylebone]
Stable Yard – as they leads to the stables of St James's Palace [St James's]
Stable Yard Road – as they leads to the stables of St James's Palace [St James's]
Stacey Street – after John Stacey, local landowner in the 16th century [St Gile's]
Stafford Place – after Viscount Stafford, who lived in a house adjacent in the 17th century [Westminster]
Stafford Street W1 - Named after Margaret Stafford local leaseholder in the late 17th century and partner of developer Sir Thomas Bond who built on this site in the seventeenth century.
Stag Place SW1 - The old brewhouse of the Westminster Abbey moved here after the dissolution of the monasteries in the sixteenth century. Later known as the Stag Brewery, was demolished in 1959,
Stainer Street – after John Stainer, prominent Victorian-era organist [Southwark]
Staining Lane – from Saxon-era ‘Staeninga haga’, meaning place owned by the people of Staines [City of London]
Stalbridge Street – for the Baker family, assistants of local landowners the Portmans, who owned land in Stalbridge, Dorset [Lisson Grove]
Stamford Street – after Stamford, Lincolnshire, hometown of John Marshall, local benefactor and churchman [Waterloo]
Stanhope Gate – after Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield, who owned a mansion nearby in the 18th century [Mayfair]
Stanhope Row – after Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield, who owned a mansion nearby in the 18th century [Mayfair]
Stanhope Street - as this land was formerly owned by Dukes of Bedford; Francis Russell, 7th Duke of Bedford was married to Anna Russell, Duchess of Bedford, daughter of Charles Stanhope, 3rd Earl of Harrington [Regent’s Park]
Stanley Crescent and Stanley Gardens Kensington and Chelsea Edward Stanley, 2nd Baron Stanley of Alderley President of the Board of Trade at the time the road was built.
Stannary Place - as it formed part of the manor of Kennington, which belonged to the Duchy of Cornwall, who also owned land around the stannary towns of Cornwall and Devon [Kennington];
Stannary Street was formerly Kennington Place [Kennington]
Staple Inn and Staple Inn Buildings – after the adjacent Staple Inn [City of London]
Star Alley – after a former inn here of this name [City of London]
Star Yard – after the former Starre Tavern here [Holborn]
Starcross Street – formerly Exmouth Street, it was renamed after the town of this name in Devon to avoid confusion with similarly named streets [Regent’s Park]
Station Approach Road – as it leads to Waterloo station [Waterloo]
Stationer’s Hall Court – after the adjacent hall of the Worshipful Company of Stationers and Newspaper Makers [City of London]
Stephen Mews and Stephen Street – after Stephen Lemaistre, business partner of local resident Peter Gaspard Gresse in the 1760s [Fitzrovia]
Stephenson Way – after Robert Stephenson, Victoria-era builder of the adjacent Euston station [Regent’s Park]
Sterry Street – after the Sterry family, local business owners in the 18th-19th centuries [Southwark]
Steve Biko Way Hounslow Steve Biko South African anti-apartheid activist
Stew Lane – after a former stew (hot bath) here [City of London]
Stillington Street – after Robert Stillington, Bishop of Bath in the 15th century [Westminster]
Stone House Court – after a former medieval building here called the Stone House [City of London]
Stonecutter Street – after the former stonecutting trade that took place here [City of London]
Stones End Street – as this marked the pointed where the paved surface of Borough High Street ended in former times [Southwark]
Stoney Lane – simply a descriptive name, streets typically being mud tracks in former times [City of London]
Stoney Street – formerly Stony Lane, both simply descriptive names [Southwark]
Storey's Gate SW1 - Abraham Storey, one of Wren's master-masons, built Storey's gate that now remembers his name. After 17th century St James’s Park birdkeeper Edward Storey, who had a house near here
Strand – from Old English ‘stond’, meaning the edge of a river; the river Thames formerly reached here prior to the building of the Thames Embankment [Strand]
Strand Lane – from Old English ‘stond’, meaning the edge of a river; the river Thames formerly reached here prior to the building of the Embankment [Covent Garden]
Stratford Place – after Edward Stratford, who owned a house nearby and built this street in the 1770s [Marylebone]
Stratton Street – after John Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley of Stratton, local resident in the late 17th century [Mayfair]
Streatham Street – after Streatham, where local landowners the dukes of Bedford also owned property [Bloomsbury]
Strutton Ground – corruption of ‘Stourton’, from Stourton House where the local Dacre family lived [Westminster]
Strype Street E1 - John Strype,the son of a Huguenot weaver, was born here in 1643. He became an antiquary, historian and a parson.
Studio Place – as this are was home to many artists’ studios in the early 20th century [Belgravia]
Stukeley Street – after William Stukeley, clergyman and archaeologist, who lived nearby in the 18th century [Covent Garden]
Suffolk Lane – after a former house here belonging to the dukes of Suffolk [City of London]
Suffolk Place – after Thomas Howard, Earl of Suffolk, who owned a stable yard attached to Northumberland House which lay on this site [Soho]
Suffolk Street – after Thomas Howard, Earl of Suffolk, who owned a stable yard attached to Northumberland House which lay on this site [Soho]
Sumner Buildings – after Charles Sumner, Bishop of Winchester in the 19th century [Southwark]
Sumner Road, Harrow Part of a cluster of streets named after teachers and headmasters of Harrow School: Robert Carey Sumner (1760–1771).
Sumner Street – after Charles Sumner, Bishop of Winchester in the 19th century [Southwark]
Sun Street – after a former inn of this name [City of London]
Sun Street Passage – after a former inn of this name [City of London]
Surrey Row – after the traditional county here of Surrey [Southwark]
Surrey Steps – built on the site of Arundel House, owned by the Howard family who had a branch holding the earldom of Surrey [Holborn]
Surrey Street – built on the site of Arundel House, owned by the Howard family who had a branch holding the earldom of Surrey [Holborn]
Sussex Place – after Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Sussex Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one [Victoria]
Sutherland Row – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate, several members of whom married into the Duke of Sutherland family [Victoria]
Sutherland Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate, several members of whom married into the Duke of Sutherland family [Victoria]
Sutton Row – Thomas Belasyse, 1st Viscount Fauconberg owned a house here in the 17th century – his country house was Sutton House in Chiswick [Soho]
Swallow Passage – after a field on this site owned by Thomas Swallow in the 1530s [Mayfair]
Swallow Place – after a field on this site owned by Thomas Swallow in the 1530s [Mayfair]
Swallow Street Westminster Thomas Swallow Lessee of the pastures on which the road was built in 1540.
Swan Lane – after a former inn here called the Olde Swanne; formerly Ebbgate, after a watergate here [City of London]
Swan Street – after a former inn here of this name [Southwark]
Swedeland Court – after the former Swedish community based here [City of London]
Swinton Place – after local 18th century landowner James Swinton [Clerkenwell]
Swinton Street – after local 18th century landowner James Swinton [Clerkenwell]
Swiss Court – after the Swiss Centre that formerly stood here [Soho]
Sycamore Street – by association with the nearby Timber Street, or possibly after an inn of this name [Finsbury]


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

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Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Reply
Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

Reply

Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

Reply
Comment
Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

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Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Comment
Marion James   
Added: 12 Mar 2021 17:43 GMT   

26 Edith Street Haggerston
On Monday 11th October 1880 Charlotte Alice Haynes was born at 26 Edith Street Haggerston the home address of her parents her father Francis Haynes a Gilder by trade and her mother Charlotte Alice Haynes and her two older siblings Francis & George who all welcomed the new born baby girl into the world as they lived in part of the small Victorian terraced house which was shared by another family had an outlook view onto the world of the Imperial Gas Works site - a very grey drab reality of the life they were living as an East End working class family - 26 Edith Street no longer stands in 2021 - the small rundown polluted terrace houses of Edith Street are long since gone along with the Gas Companies buildings to be replaced with green open parkland that is popular in 21st century by the trendy residents of today - Charlotte Alice Haynes (1880-1973) is the wife of my Great Grand Uncle Henry Pickett (1878-1930) As I research my family history I slowly begin to understand the life my descendants had to live and the hardships that they went through to survive - London is my home and there are many areas of this great city I find many of my descendants living working and dying in - I am yet to find the golden chalice! But in all truthfulness my family history is so much more than hobby its an understanding of who I am as I gather their stories. Did Charlotte Alice Pickett nee Haynes go on to live a wonderful life - no I do not think so as she became a widow in 1930 worked in a canteen and never remarried living her life in and around Haggerston & Hackney until her death in 1973 with her final resting place at Manor Park Cemetery - I think Charlotte most likely excepted her lot in life like many women from her day, having been born in the Victorian era where the woman had less choice and standing in society, which is a sad state of affairs - So I will endeavour to write about Charlotte and the many other women in my family history to give them the voice of a life they so richly deserve to be recorded !

Edith Street was well situated for the new public transport of two railway stations in 1880 :- Haggerston Railway Station opened in 1867 & Cambridge Heath Railway Station opened in 1872


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Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

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Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply
Lived here
David James Bloomfield   
Added: 13 Jul 2021 11:54 GMT   

Hurstway Street, W10
Jimmy Bloomfield who played for Arsenal in the 1950s was brought up on this street. He was a QPR supporter as a child, as many locals would be at the time, as a teen he was rejected by them as being too small. They’d made a mistake

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Comment
Added: 6 Jul 2021 05:38 GMT   

Wren Road in the 1950s and 60s
Living in Grove Lane I knew Wren Road; my grandfather’s bank, Lloyds, was on the corner; the Scout District had their office in the Congregational Church and the entrance to the back of the Police station with the stables and horses was off it. Now very changed - smile.

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fariba   
Added: 28 Jun 2021 00:48 GMT   

Tower Bridge Business Complex, S
need for my coursework

Source: university

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Lived here
Kim Johnson   
Added: 24 Jun 2021 19:17 GMT   

Limehouse Causeway (1908)
My great grandparents were the first to live in 15 Tomlins Terrace, then my grandparents and parents after marriage. I spent the first two years of my life there. My nan and her family lived at number 13 Tomlins Terrace. My maternal grandmother lived in Maroon house, Blount Street with my uncle. Nan, my mum and her brothers were bombed out three times during the war.

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Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Golden Lane Estate, EC1Y The Golden Lane Housing Estate is a 1950s council housing complex in the City of London.
Honourable Artillery Company Museum The Honourable Artillery Company Museum opened in 1987.
Tenter Ground Tenter Ground harks back to the seventeenth century when this patch of land was surrounded by weavers’ houses and workshops and used to wash and stretch their fabrics on ’tenters’ to dry.

NEARBY STREETS
99 Bishopsgate, EC2N 99 Bishopsgate is a commercial skyscraper located on Bishopsgate, a major thoroughfare in the City of London financial district.
Aldermanbury Square, EC2V At the centre of Saxon London, the aldermen (elder statesmen of City wards) met in a ’bury’ (house) in a time before the Guildhall was built.
Aldermanbury, EC2V Aldermanbury is the Saxon name for ’Eldermen’ (elder statesmen) and ’bury’ (house).
Aldermans Walk, EC2M Alderman’s Walk was formerly Dashwood’s Walk, for Francis Dashwood, who lived here in the 18th century.
Aldersgate Street, EC2Y Aldersgate Street is located on the west side of the Barbican Estate.
Andrewes Highwalk, EC2Y Andrewes Highwalk is named for Lancelot Andrewes, rector of the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate Church.
Andrewes House, EC2Y Residential block
Appold Street, EC2A Appold Street runs north-south on the City of London side of Liverpool Street station.
Austin Friars, EC2N Austin Friars was an Augustinian friary from its foundation in the 1260s, until its dissolution in 1538.
Baltic Street West, EC1Y Baltic Street is split into east and west halves.
Basinghall Avenue, EC2V Basinghall Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Basinghall Street, EC2V Basinghall Street joins Gresham Street to the south.
Bassishaw Highwalk, EC2V Bassishaw Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Bastion Highwalk, EC2Y Bastion Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Beech Street, EC1Y Beech Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Bells Alley, EC2N Bells Alley is a road in the SW6 postcode area
Bishopsgate Churchyard, EC2M Bishopsgate Churchyard is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Blomfield Street, EC2M Blomfield Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Bonhill Street, EC2A Bonhill Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Bornhill Street, EC2A Bornhill Street is a location in London.
Brandon Mews, EC2Y Brandon Mews is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Brewers Hall Gardens, EC2V Brewers Hall Gardens is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Bridgewater Square, EC2Y Bridgewater Square is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Broad Street Place, EC2M Broad Street Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Broadgate Circle, EC2M Broadgate Circle is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Broadgate, EC2M Broadgate is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Bryer Court, EC2Y Bryer Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Bunhill Row, EC1Y Bunhill Row is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Carey Lane, EC2V Carey Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Cherry Tree Walk, EC1Y Cherry Tree Walk is a road in the EC1Y postcode area
Chiswell Street, EC2Y Chiswell Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Chiswell Street, SE5 Chiswell Street is a location in London.
Christopher Street, EC2A Christopher Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Clifton Street, EC2A Clifton Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Coleman Street, EC2V Coleman Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Compter Passage, EC2V Compter Passage is a location in London.
Copthall Avenue Drapers Gardens, EC2N Drapers Gardens is a block in Copthall Avenue.
Copthall Avenue, EC2N Copthall Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
Copthall Avenue, EC2R Copthall Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
Cripplegate Street, EC1Y Cripplegate Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Crown Place, EC2A Crown Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Cutlers Gardens Arcade, EC2M Cutlers Gardens Arcade is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Defoe House, EC2Y Residential block
Dominion Street, EC2M Dominion Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Dufferin Avenue, EC1Y Dufferin Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Dufferin Street, EC1Y Dufferin Street runs between Bunhill Row and Whitecross Street.
Earl Street, EC2A Earl Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
East Market, EC2Y East Market is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Eldon Street, EC2M Eldon Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Epworth Street, EC2A Epworth Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Errol Street, EC1Y Errol Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Exchange Place, EC2M Exchange Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Fann Street, EC1Y Fann Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Ferroners House, EC2Y Ferroners House
Finsbury Avenue, EC2M Finsbury Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Finsbury Circus Gardens, EC2M Finsbury Circus Gardens is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Finsbury Circus, EC2M Finsbury Circus is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Finsbury Court, EC2A Finsbury Court was obliterated in a redevelopment programme taking in Finsbury Pavement.
Finsbury Pavement, EC2M Finsbury Pavement was the first pavement of firm ground north of the marshy Moorfields.
Finsbury Square, EC2A Finsbury Square is a 0.7-hectare square in central London which includes a six-rink grass bowling green.
Finsbury Street, EC2A Finsbury Street is a road in the EC2Y postcode area
Fore Street Avenue, EC2Y Fore Street Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Fore Street, EC2Y Fore Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Fortune Street, EC1Y Fortune Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Gilbert Bridge, EC2Y Gilbert Bridge is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Gilbert House, EC2Y Residential block
Golden Lane, EC1Y Golden Lane connects Old Street and Beech Street.
Golden Lane, EC2Y Golden Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Goswell Road, EC1A Goswell Road is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Great Swan Alley, EC2R Great Swan Alley is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
Great Winchester Street, EC2N Great Winchester Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
Gresham Street, EC2V Gresham Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Guildhall Yard, EC2V Guildhall Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Holywell Row, EC2A Holywell Row is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Honey Lane, EC2V Honey Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Ironmongers Hall Shaftesbury Place, EC2Y Ironmongers Hall Shaftesbury Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Lackington Street, EC2M Lackington Street is a road in the EC2A postcode area
Lamb’s Passage, EC1Y Lamb’s Passage was formerly Great Swordbearers (Sword Bearers) Alley.
Lauderdale Tower, EC2Y Lauderdale Tower is the westernmost tower in the Barbican, facing onto Lauderdale Place.
Liverpool Street, EC2M Liverpool Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Lomax Cocoon, EC2A A street within the EC2A postcode
London Wall Buildings, EC2M London Wall Buildings are a commercial development.
London Wall, EC2M London Wall is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
London Wall, EC2Y London Wall is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
London Wall, EC2Y London Wall is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
Love Lane, EC2V Love Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Mason’s Avenue, EC2V A street within the EC2V postcode
Milton Court, EC2Y Milton Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Milton Street, EC2Y Milton Street was formerly known as Grub Street.
Mitre Court, EC2V Mitre Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Monkwell Square, EC2Y Monkwell Square is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Moorfields Highwalk, EC2Y Moorfields Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Moorfields, EC2Y Moorfields is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Moorgate Hall, EC2M Moorgate Hall is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Moorgate Place, EC2R Moorgate Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
Moorgate, EC2M Moorgate is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Moorgate, EC2R Moorgate is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
New Broad Street House, EC2M A block within the EC2M postcode
New Broad Street, EC2M New Broad Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
New Union Street, EC2Y New Union Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Newgate Street, EC2V Newgate Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Noble Street, EC2V Noble Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Oat Lane, EC2V Oat Lane has been marked on London maps since 1600 and before.
Octagon Arcade, EC2M Octagon Arcade is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Old Broad Street, EC2M Old Broad Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Old Broad Street, EC2N Old Broad Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
Pickax Street, EC2Y Pickax Street once ran from Long Lane to Goswell Road (which before 1864 was called Goswell Street).
Pindar Street, EC2A Pindar Street is a road in the EC2A postcode area
Primrose Street, EC2A Primrose Street is a location in London.
Roman House, EC2Y Roman House is a location in London.
Ropemaker Street, EC2M Ropemaker Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Roscoe Street, EC1Y Roscoe Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Salisbury House, EC2M Residential block
Scrutton Street, EC2A Scrutton Street is the eastern extension of Epworth Street.
Seddon Highwalk, EC2Y Seddon Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Silk Street, EC2Y Silk Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Snowden Street, EC2A Snowden Street is a road in the EC2A postcode area
South Place, EC2M South Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
St Alphage Garden, EC2Y St Alphage Garden is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
St Alphage Highwalk, EC2V St Alphage Highwalk is part of the Barbican.
St Ann’s Lane, EC2V St Ann’s Lane was the name for the west end of Gresham Street until the 1860s.
St Martin’s Le Grand, EC2V St Martin’s Le Grand is a street north of Newgate Street and a former liberty within the City of London
St. Giles Terrace, EC2Y St Giles Terrace lies alongside St Giles Cripplegate church.
Stock Exchange Building, EC2N Stock Exchange Building is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
Sun Street Passage, EC2M Sun Street Passage is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Sun Street, EC2M Sun Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Telegraph Street, EC2R Telegraph Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
The Postern, EC2Y The Postern is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
The Sutton Estate, EC1Y The Sutton Estate is a road in the N1 postcode area
Thomas More Highwalk, EC2Y Thomas More Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Three Nun Court, EC2V Three Nun Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Throgmorton Avenue, EC2N Throgmorton Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
Union Court, EC2N Union Court is an alleyway off of Broad Street.
Vandy Street, EC2A Vandy Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Wallside, EC2Y Wallside is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Warwick Yard, EC1Y Warwick Yard is a road in the EC1Y postcode area
Whitecross Place, EC2M Whitecross Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Whitecross Street, EC1Y Whitecross Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Willoughby Highwalk, EC2Y Willoughby Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Wilson Street, EC2A Wilson Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Wilson Street, EC2M Wilson Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Wood Street, EC2V Wood Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Wood Street, EC2Y Wood Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Wormwood Street, EC2N Wormwood Street refers to the wormwood plant which used to grow on the London Wall and in other areas of wasteland in the City.
Worship Mews, EC2A Worship Mews is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Worship Street, EC2A Worship Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
All Bar One Appold Street This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
All Bar One Moorgate This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Amber Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Babble City This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Balls Brothers Austin Friars This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Balls Brothers Ltd This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bottlescrue This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Circle Bar, Level 0 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Crab Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Davy’s This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Enoteca This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Fox Fine Wines This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Honourable Artillery Company This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Jamies This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
La Tasca This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Old Doctor Butler’s Head This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Old Kings Head The Old Kings Head is located at 28 Holywell Row, EC2.
Sabor Iberico This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Searcys Bars @ GSM & D This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Singer This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Slug and Lettuce This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Botanist This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fleetwood This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Flying Horse This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Gable This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Globe This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Jugged Hare This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Kings Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Lord Aberconway This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Lord Raglan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Rack & Tenter This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Railway Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Red Lion This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Shakespeare This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Telegraph This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Windmill This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Wood Street Bar and Restaurant This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


City of London

The City of London constituted most of London from its settlement by the Romans in the 1st century AD to the Middle Ages, but the conurbation has since grown far beyond its borders.

As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis of Greater London, though it remains a notable part of central London. It holds city status in its own right and is also a separate ceremonial county.

It is widely referred to as 'The City' (often written on maps as City and differentiated from the phrase 'the city of London') or 'the Square Mile' as it is 1.12 square miles in area. These terms are also often used as metonyms for the United Kingdom's financial services industry, which continues a notable history of being largely based in the City.

The local authority for the City, the City of London Corporation, is unique in the UK and has some unusual responsibilities for a local council, such as being the police authority. It also has responsibilities and ownerships beyond the City's boundaries. The Corporation is headed by the Lord Mayor of the City of London, an office separate from (and much older than) the Mayor of London.

The City is a major business and financial centre, ranking as the world's leading centre of global finance. Throughout the 19th century, the City was the world's primary business centre, and continues to be a major meeting point for businesses.

The City had a resident population of about 7000 in 2011 but over 300,000 people commute to it and work there, mainly in the financial services sector. The legal profession forms a major component of the northern and western sides of the City - especially in the Temple and Chancery Lane areas where the Inns of Court are located, of which two—Inner Temple and Middle Temple - fall within the City of London boundary.


LOCAL PHOTOS
St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
TUM image id: 1554045418
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Lombard Court EC3
TUM image id: 1530121496
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Coffee house sign
TUM image id: 1605528231
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
"Cheapside and Bow Church" engraved by W. Albutt, 1837 steel engraved print after a picture by T.H. Shepherd, first published in The History of London: Illustrated by Views in London and Westminster.
Credit: W. Albutt
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

The gravestone of English poet William Blake in Bunhill Fields Burial Ground
Credit: https://careergappers.com/
Licence:
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Great Arthur House, at the centre of the Golden Lane Estate, was the tallest residential building in Britain at the time of its construction.
Credit: Steve F/Wiki commons
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

A view of Cornhill, Lombard Street and the Mansion House in the City of London (1810)
Credit: Ackermann’s Repository
Licence:
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Coffee house sign
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

A 1950s (or earlier?) City of London street sign from Change Alley, EC3.
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

"Cheapside and Bow Church" engraved by W. Albutt, 1837 steel engraved print after a picture by T.H. Shepherd, first published in The History of London: Illustrated by Views in London and Westminster.
Credit: W. Albutt
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

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