Oxford Circus, W1B

Road in/near Oxford Circus, existing between the 1810s and now

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(51.5151 -0.14193) 

Oxford Circus, W1B

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Road · * · W1B ·
August
9
2020

Oxford Circus was originally called Regent Circus.

The development of Oxford Street began in the 18th century once local fields had been purchased by the Earl of Oxford.

In 1739, a gardener called Thomas Huddle built property on the north side. Buildings were erected on the corner of Oxford Street and Davies Street in the 1750s and further development occurred between 1763 and 1793.

By the end of the 18th century, Oxford Street had been built up from St Giles Circus to Park Lane, containing a mix of residential houses, pubs and theatres.

Oxford Circus was designed as part of the development of Regent Street by the architect John Nash in 1810. The four quadrants of the circus were designed by Sir Henry Tanner and built between 1913 and 1928.




Main source: Oxford Street - Wikipedia
Further citations and sources




NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Adam and Eve Inn The Adam and Eve was an inn on Oxford Street.
All Souls Church All Souls Church is an evangelical Anglican church situated at the north end of Regent Street.
Oxford Circus Oxford Circus, designed by John Nash in 1811.

NEARBY STREETS
Adam and Eve Court, W1D The court was named for the nearby Adam and Eve tavern.
Aldburgh Mews, W1U Aldburgh Mews is a road in the W1U postcode area
All Souls Place, W1B All Souls Place is a short cul-de-sac in the shadow of All Souls Church, originating in the eighteenth century as a mews off Edward Street.
Argyll Street, W1F Argyll Street was named after John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll, owner of the land in the 18th century.
Avery Row, W1K Avery Row was probably named after Henry Avery, an 18th century bricklayer who built this street over the Tyburn Brook.
Beak Street, W1B Beak Street runs roughly east-west between Regent Street and Lexington Street.
Beak Street, W1F Beak Street is named after Thomas Beake, one of the Queen’s messengers.
Berners Mews, W1T Berners Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Berners Place, W1T Berners Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Berners Street, W1D William Berners completed building in 1763 what is today Berners Street.
Berners Street, W1D Berners Street runs from the junction of Oxford Street and Wardour Street to join up with Mortimer Street and the former Middlesex Hospital.
Berwick Road, W1F Berwick Road is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Berwick Street, W1F Berwick Street commemorates the Duke of Berwick, an illegitimate son of James II.
Blenheim Street, W1S Blenheim Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Bourdon Place, W1K Bourdon Place is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Bourlet Close, W1W Bourlet Close is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Boyle Street, W1S Boyle Street was built on a piece of land called the Ten Acres to discharge some Boyle family debts.
Brewer Street, W1D Brewer Street runs west to east from Glasshouse Street to Wardour Street.
Brewer Street, W1F Brewer Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Bridle Lane, W1F Bridle Lane is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Broadwick Street, W1F Broadwick Street runs west-east between Marshall Street and Wardour Street, crossing Berwick Street.
Brook Street, W1K Brook Street was named after the Tyburn Brook that formerly ran nearby,
Brook Street, W1S Brook Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Brooks Mews, W1K Brooks Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Bywell Place, W1T Bywell Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Carnaby Street, W1F Carnaby Street became the heart of Swinging London.
Cavendish Place, W1G Cavendish Place is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Cavendish Square, W1G Cavendish Square was laid out in 1717–18 at the beginning of the transformation of Harley family lands in Marylebone.
Cavendish Street, W1G Cavendish Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Chandos Street, W1B This is a street in the W1B postcode area
Chandos Street, W1G Chandos Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Charlotte Place, W1T Charlotte Place is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Chesham House, W1B Residential block
Coach And Horses Yard, W1S Coach And Horses Yard is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Coach Horses Yard, W1S Coach Horses Yard is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Conduit Avenue, SE10 Conduit Avenue is a road in the SE10 postcode area
Conduit Street, W1B Conduit Street is a road in the W1B postcode area
Conduit Street, W1S Conduit Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Cumberland Gate, W1C Cumberland Gate is one of the streets of London in the W1C postal area.
Darblay Street, W1F Darblay Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Davies Mews, W1K Davies Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Davies Street, W1J Davies Street is a road in the W1J postcode area
Davies Street, W1K Davies Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Davis Street, W1K Davis Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Dean’s Mews, W1G This is a street in the W1G postcode area
Deans Mews, W1G Deans Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Dering Street, W1S Dering Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Duck Lane, W1F Duck Lane is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Dufours Place, W1F Dufours Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Eastcastle Street, W1D Eastcastle Street was originally called Castle Street East.
Eastcastle Street, W1T The portion of Eastcastle Street to the east of Wells Street originally belonged to the Berners Estate.
Flaxman Court, W1F Flaxman Court is a road in the W1F postcode area
Foubert’s Place, W1F This is a street in the W1F postcode area
Fouberts Place, W1F Fouberts Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Ganton Street, W1F Ganton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Gilbert Street, W1K Gilbert Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Golden Square, W1F Golden Square is a historic Soho square, dating from the 1670s.
Great Castle Street, W1B Great Castle Street was begun in 1722.
Great Castle Street, W1W Great Castle Street was one of the main streets of the Harley Estate.
Great Chapel Street, W1F Great Chapel Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Great Marlborough Street, W1B Great Marlborough Street runs east of Regent Street past Carnaby Street towards Noel Street.
Great Marlborough Street, W1F Great Marlborough Street was named after John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough.
Great Pulteney Street, W1F Great Pulteney Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Great Windmill Street, W1F Great Windmill Street has had a long association with music and entertainment, most notably the Windmill Theatre.
Greens Court, W1F Greens Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Grosvenor Hill, W1K Grosvenor Hill is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Grosvenor Street, W1K Grosvenor Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Ham Yard, W1D Ham Yard is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
Hanover Square, W1S Hanover Square was created as the ’Whig’ square with Cavendish Square being the ’Tory’ square.
Hanover Street, W1S Hanover Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Harcourt House, W1G Residential block
Harewood Place, W1S Harewood Place is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Harley Place, W1G Harley Place is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Harmont House, W1G Residential block
Haunch Of Venison Yard, W1K Haunch Of Venison Yard is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Henrietta Place, W1G Henrietta Place is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Hills Place, W1F Hills Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Holland Street, W1F Holland Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Hollen Street, W1F Hollen Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Holles Street, W1C Holles Street runs north from Oxford Street, on the east side of the John Lewis store.
Hopkins Street, W1F Hopkins Street is a road in the W1F postcode area
Ingestre Court, W1F Ingestre Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Ingestre Place, W1F Ingestre Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
International House, W1B Residential block
John Prince’s Street, W1G This is a street in the W1G postcode area
John Princes Street, W1G John Princes Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Kemp’s Court, W1F Kemp’s Court is situated in the heart of Berwick Street Market where a line of stalls stretch down both sides of the road.
Kingly Court, W1B Kingly Court is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Kingly Street, W1B Kingly Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Lancashire Court, W1S Lancashire Court is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Langham House, W1B Residential block
Langham Place, W1B Langham Place is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Langham Street, W1W Langham Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Lexington Street Cos, W1F Lexington Street Cos is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Lexington Street, W1F Lexington Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Linen Hall, W1B Linen Hall is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Little Marlborough Street, W1F Little Marlborough Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Little Portland Street, W1W Little Portland Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Little Titchfield Street, W1W Little Titchfield Street is a road in the W1W postcode area
Livonia Street, W1F Livonia Street was originally Bentinck Street, family name of owner the Duke of Portland.
Lower James Street, W1F Lower James Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Lowndes Court, W1F Lowndes Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Maddox Street, W1S Maddox Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Mansfield Street, W1G Mansfield Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Margaret Court, W1W Margaret Court is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Margaret Street, W1B Margaret Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Margaret Street, W1G Margaret Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Margaret Street, W1W Margaret Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Market Place, W1W Market Place is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Marlborough Court, W1F Marlborough Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Marshall Street, W1F Marshall Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Marylebone Lane, W1C Marylebone Lane is a road in the W1C postcode area
Marylebone Mews, W1G Marylebone Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Marylebone Passage, W1W Marylebone Passage is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Masons Arms Mews, W1S Masons Arms Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Mason’s Arms Mews, W1S Mason’s Arms Mews is a road in the W1S postcode area
Mayfair Mews, SW12 A street within the W1S postcode
Mews Yard, WC2H Mews Yard is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Milford House, W1G Residential block
Mill Street, W1S Mill Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Morley House, W1B Residential block
Mortimer Street, N1 A street within the W1W postcode
Mortimer Street, W1 Mortimer Street is one of the streets of London in the W1 postal area.
Mortimer Street, W1T Mortimer Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Mortimer Street, W1W Mortimer Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Nassau Street, W1W Nassau Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
New Bond Street, W1S New Bond Street is the northernmost section of what is simply known as ’Bond Street’ in general use.
New Burlington Mews, W1B New Burlington Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
New Burlington Place, W1S New Burlington Place is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
New Burlington Street, W1B New Burlington Street is a road in the W1B postcode area
New Burlington Street, W1S New Burlington Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Newburg Road, W1F Newburg Road is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Newburgh Street, W1F Newburgh Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Newman Passage, W1T Newman Passage is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Newman Street, W1T Newman Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Noel Street, W1F Noel Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Old Cavendish Street, W1 Old Cavendish Street is a road in the W1 postcode area
Oxford Circus Avenue, W1F Oxford Circus Avenue exists on a lot of London maps but doesn’t exist.
Oxford Street, W1A This is a street in the W1A postcode area
Oxford Street, W1D This is a street in the W1D postcode area
Oxford Street, W1F This is a street in the W1F postcode area
Palladium House, W1B Palladium House is a grade II listed (in 1981) Art Deco office building located on the corner of Great Marlborough Street and Argyll Street.
Peter Street, W1F Peter Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Poland Street, W1F Poland Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Portland Mews, W1F Portland Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Portland Place, W1A This is a street in the W1A postcode area
Princes Street, W1B Princes Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Princess House, W1W Residential block
Queen Anne Mews, W1G Queen Anne Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Queen Anne Street, W1G Queen Anne Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Ramillies Place, W1F Ramillies Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Ramillies Street, W1F Ramillies Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Rathbone Street, W1T Rathbone Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Regent Place, W1B Regent Place is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Regent Street, SW1Y Regent Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Regent Street, W1B Regent Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Regent Street, W1J This is a street in the W1J postcode area
Riding House Street, W1W Riding House Street commemorates a riding house and barracks of the First Troop of Horse Grenadier Guards.
Saint George Street, W1S Saint George Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Sandgate Trading Estate, SE15 A street within the W1K postcode
Sandringham Court, W1F Sandringham Court is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Savile Row, W1S Savile Row is known worldwide for gentlemen’s tailoring.
Sedley Place, W1C Sedley Place is one of the streets of London in the W1C postal area.
Sedley Place, W1K Sedley Place is a road in the W1K postcode area
Sheraton Street, W1F Sheraton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Silver Place, W1F Silver Place is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Smiths Court, W1D Smiths Court is one of the streets of London in the W1D postal area.
South Molton Lane, W1K South Molton Lane is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
South Molton Street, W1K South Molton Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
St Anne’s Court, W1F St Anne’s Court is an alleyway that connects Dean Street and Wardour Street.
St George Street, W1S St George Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
St Georges Square, E14 St Georges Square is one of the streets of London in the E14 postal area.
St. Anselm’s Place, W1K St. Anselm’s Place is a road in the W1K postcode area
Stratford Place, W1C Stratford Place is one of the streets of London in the W1C postal area.
Swallow Place, W1B Swallow Place is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Tenterden Street, W1S Tenterden Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Three Kings Yard, W1K Three Kings Yard is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Three Kings’ Yard, W1K This is a street in the W1K postcode area
Union Street, W1W The easternmost section of Riding House Street was previously known as Union Street.
Upper James Street, W1F Upper James Street is one of the streets of London in the W1F postal area.
Upper John Street, W1F Upper John Street is a road in the W1F postcode area
Vere Street, W1G Vere Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Walker’s Court, W1D Walker’s Court is one of the many passageways which in past years was known as ’Paved Alley’.
Wardour Mews, W1F Wardour Mews is a cul-de-sac off of Portland Street.
Wardour Street, W1F Wardour Street is a street that runs north from Leicester Square, through Chinatown, across Shaftesbury Avenue to Oxford Street.
Warwick Street, W1B Warwick Street is one of the streets of London in the W1B postal area.
Weighhouse Street, W1K Weighhouse Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Welbeck Street, W1G Welbeck Street has historically been associated with the medical profession.
Welbeck Way, W1G Welbeck Way is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Wells Mews, N11 A street within the W1T postcode
Wells Mews, W1T Wells Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
Wells Street, W1D Wells Street - ’Welses Lane’ - is first recorded in 1692.
Wells Street, W1W Wells Street is one of the streets of London in the W1T postal area.
West One Shopping Centre, W1C West One Shopping Centre is one of the streets of London in the W1C postal area.
Wigmore Place, E17 A street within the postcode
Wigmore Place, W1U Wigmore Place is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Wimpole Street, W1G Wimpole Street is one of the streets of London in the W1G postal area.
Winsley Street, W1D Winsley Street is a road in the W1D postcode area
Winsley Street, W1W Winsley Street is one of the streets of London in the W1W postal area.
Woodstock Street, W1C Woodstock Street is one of the streets of London in the W1C postal area.


Oxford Circus

Oxford Circus, designed by John Nash in 1811.

Oxford Circus, the busy intersection of Oxford Street and Regent Street, was constructed in the beginning of the 19th century, and was designed by John Nash. Regent Street had been commissioned by Prince Regent, who was later to become King George IV, as a grand scheme to connect the Princes home at Carlton House with his newly acquired property at Regents Park. Nash designed a wide boulevard with a sweeping curve that became a clear dividing line between the less respectable Soho and the fashionable squares and streets of Mayfair. Born from the concept of Nash’s layout of the New Street in 1812, frontage alignments remain, with the rebuilt listed architecture of 1920s buildings.

The surrounding area contains important elements of the Nash heritage. All frontages on the Circus are Grade II Listed. The entire of Regent Street is also listed and sits within a conservation area.

The circus is served by Oxford Circus tube station, which is directly beneath the junction itself.

Oxford Circus station has entrances on all four corners of the intersection. The station is an interchange between the Central, Victoria and Bakerloo lines. It is the fourth busiest station on the network and the busiest without connection to the National Rail service. It opened on the Central London Railway on 30 July 1900, with the Baker Street and Waterloo Railway’s platforms opening on 10 March 1906. The two companies had separate surface buildings and lift shafts. The station buildings, which remain today as exits from the station, were constructed on very confined plots on either side of Argyll Street on the south side of Oxford Street, just to the east of the circus itself. The stations were originally built as entirely separate, but connecting passages were swiftly provided at platform level. The surviving Central London Railway building to the east of Argyll Street is the best surviving example of the stations designed by Harry Bell Measures, and the Bakerloo line building to the west is a classic Leslie Green structure. Both station buildings are Grade II listed.

Almost from the outset, overcrowding has been a constant problem at the station and it has seen numerous improvements to its facilities and below-ground arrangements to deal with this difficulty. After much discussion between the then two separate operators, a major reconstruction began in 1912. This saw a new ticket hall, dealing with both lines, built in the basement of the Bakerloo station, the Bakerloo lifts removed, and new deep-level escalators opened down to the Bakerloo line level. Access to the Central line was by way of existing deep-level subways. The new works came into use on 9 May 1914 with the CLR lifts still available for passengers. By 1923 even this rearrangement was unable to cope, so a second rebuilding commenced. This saw a second set of escalators built directly down to the Central line, the CLR station building becoming an exit only. Then, on 2 October 1928, a third escalator leading to the Bakerloo platforms was opened. Unusually, lifts came back into prominence at an Underground station when, in 1942, a set of high-speed lifts came into use, largely used as an exit route from the Central line platforms directly to the Argyll Street exit building.

The Victoria line opened on 7 March 1969. To handle the additional passenger loads, a new ticket hall was constructed directly under the road junction. To excavate the new ticket hall below the roadway, traffic was diverted for five years (August 1963 to Easter 1968) on to a temporary bridge-like structure known as the ’umbrella’ covering the Regent Street/Oxford Street intersection. Services tunnels were constructed to carry water mains and telecom cables past the new ticket hall. Construction of the Victoria line station tunnels with their platforms, the new escalator shafts and the linking passages to the Central line platforms was carried out from access shafts sunk from nearby Cavendish Square, Upper Regent Street and Argyll Street. To this day, traffic passing through the Oxford Circus intersection literally travels over the roof of the ticket office.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Buses at Oxford Circus
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The Arm of the Law
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