Kilburn

Underground station, existing between 1879 and now

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Kilburn

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Underground station · West Hampstead · ·
JUNE
13
2015

Kilburn is an area which straddles both sides of the Edgware Road (Kilburn High Road).

Kilburn High Road originated as an ancient trackway, part of a Celtic route between the settlements now known as Canterbury and St Albans. Under Roman rule, the route was paved. In Anglo-Saxon times the road became known as Watling Street.

Kilburn grew up on the banks of a stream which has been known variously as Cuneburna, Kelebourne and Cyebourne, which flows from Hampstead down through Hyde Park and into the River Thames. It is suggested the name means either Royal River or Cattle River ('Bourne' being an Anglo-Saxon word for 'river'). That river is known today as the Westbourne.

The name Kilburn was first recorded in 1134 as Cuneburna, referring to the priory which had been built on the site of the cell of a hermit known as Godwyn. Godwyn had built his hermitage by the Kilburn river during the reign of Henry I, and both his hermitage and the priory took their name from the river.

Kilburn Priory was a small community of nuns, probably Augustinian canonesses. It was founded in 1134 at the Kilburn river crossing on Watling Street (the modern-day junction of Kilburn High Road and Belsize Road). Kilburn Priory's position on Watling Street meant that it became a popular resting point for pilgrims heading for the shrines at St Albans and Willesden. The Priory was dissolved in 1536-37 by Henry VIII, and nothing remains of it today. The priory lands included a mansion and a hostium (a guesthouse), which may have been the origin of the Red Lion pub, thought to have been founded in 1444. Opposite, the Bell Inn was opened around 1600, on the site of the old mansion.

The fashion for taking 'medicinal waters' in the 18th century came to Kilburn when a well of chalybeate waters (water impregnated with iron) was discovered near the Bell Inn in 1714. In an attempt to compete with the nearby Hampstead Well, gardens and a 'great room' were opened to promote the well, and its waters were promoted in journals of the day as cure for 'stomach ailments'.

In the 19th century the wells declined, but the Kilburn Wells remained popular as a tea garden. The Bell was demolished and rebuilt in 1863. The Kilburn stretch of Watling Street, now called Edgware Road and Kilburn High Road, was gradually built up with inns and farm houses. Kilburn did not attract any significant building until around 1819 in the area near St John's Wood.

Much of the area was developed in the last decades of the 19th century by Solomon Barnett, who named many of the streets after places in the West Country (e.g. Torbay) or after popular poets of the day (e.g. Tennyson) in honour of his wife.

There are three railway stations on Kilburn High Road: Kilburn tube station (Jubilee line) at its northern end and a little to the south Brondesbury station (London Overground). Approximately a mile further south is Kilburn High Road station (also London Overground). The name of Ian Dury's first band, Kilburn and the High Roads, refers to this road, as does the Flogging Molly song, "Kilburn High Road" and the Shack song, "Kilburn High Road".

Kilburn tube station opened as Kilburn and Brondesbury on 24 November 1879, as part of the Metropolitan and St. John's Wood Railway run by the Metropolitan Railway. Following the merger of the Metropolitan Railway into London Transport in 1933, it then became part of the Stanmore branch of the Bakerloo line on 20 November 1939, at which time the station was extensively rebuilt. The station was renamed to its current name on 25 September 1950. It was transferred to the Jubilee line on its opening, on 1 May 1979.


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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Cannon Stream The Cannon Stream was, before it was sent underground, a tributary of the Westbourne River.
Earlsfields Between Thorplands on the east and Shoot Up Hill on the west lay several fields called Earlsfields.
Kilburn Grange Park Kilburn Grange Park is a three hectare open space adjacent to Kilburn High Road.

THE STREETS OF KILBURN
Albion Mews, NW6 Albion Mews is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Birchington Road, NW6 Birchington Road runs from the Edgware Road to West End Lane.
Bransdale Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Brondesbury Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Colas Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Daynor House, NW6 Residential block
Drakes Courtyard, NW6 Drakes Courtyard is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Dunster Gardens, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Eresby Road, NW6 Eresby Road ran from Kingsgate Road to Kilburn High Road with a turning for Kingsgate Place about halfway down.
Garlinge Road, NW6 Garlinge Road connects Shoot Up Hill with Fordwych Road.
Gladstone Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Goldsmith Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Grange Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Grangeway, NW6 Grangeway, NW6 lies off of Messina Avenue.
Greville Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Greville Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Hermit Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Kilburn High Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Kilburn Place, NW6 Kilburn Place was originally Providence Place.
Kilburn Priory, NW6 Kilburn Priory is now a road - - it was once the site of a real priory
Kilburn Priory, NW8 Kilburn Priory is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Kilburn Vale, NW6 Kilburn Vale leads to the Kilburn Vale estate.
Kingsgate Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Kingsgate Road, NW6 Kingsgate Road runs between Quex Road and Hemstal Road.
Linburn House, NW6 Residential block
Loveridge Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Loveridge Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Mazenod Avenue, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Mortimer Crescent, NW6 Mortimer Crescent is a notable street in Kilburn, full of literary connections.
Mortimer Crescent, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Mortimer Place, NW6 Mortimer Place can be found in Kilburn, NW6.
Mutrix Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Netherwood Street, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Palmerston Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Prospect Place, NW6 Prospect Place was a group of houses built fronting Edgware Road south of the junction with West End Lane.
Quex Mews, NW6 Quex Mews is named after an estate in Kent.
Quex Road, NW6 Quex Road is an important road in NW6 linking the Edgware Road and West End Lane.
Regents Plaza, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Springfield Lane, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Springfield Walk, NW6 Springfield Walk has a set of very old steps that give access to Kilburn Priory.
The Arches, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Waterloo Passage, NW6 Waterloo Passage is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Webheath, NW6 Street/road in London NW6


West Hampstead

The name "West Hampstead" was a 19th century invention - the original name was West End.

Lacking its own supply of spring water and situated away from the main roads, medieval West End barely qualified as a hamlet until a few country houses were built here from the 17th century onwards. The tendency for West End Lane to become impassably muddy after heavy rain further enhanced the hamlet's isolation.

By 1815 West End was still excep­tionally quiet – so much so that its inhab­itants claimed to have heard the cannon fire at Waterloo. The construction of the Finchley Road in the 1830s brought few additions to a population that consisted of a handful of squires and some farm labourers, gardeners and craftsmen. By 1851 West End had one inn and two beershops.

Railways were the prime stimulus of growth in many country corners of modern London but few places were trans­formed as wholly as West End. With the arrival of the Hampstead Junction Railway in 1857, the Midland Railway in 1868 and the Metro­politan and St John’s Wood Railway in 1879, the new suburb of West Hampstead spread in all directions.

Rapid development in the 1880s and 1890s swept away the large houses and the streets were laid out in today's pattern. A local estate agent in Kilburn claimed that he coined the name ‘West Hampstead’, for one of the local railway stations. Public amenities such as street lighting, gas and electricity were provided and much of the frontage to West End Lane was developed as shops.

Some of the new estates were the work of big developers like the United Land Company, whose inclination was to build fairly densely, and during the latter decades of the 19th century parts of West Hampstead became increasingly working-class in character, with policeman, travelling salesmen and railwaymen mixing with clerks and artisans. Engin­eering workshops operated near the railway lines.

Twentieth-century building was limited mainly to interwar blocks of flats in the north of the district, often in place of Victorian houses that had already become run-down.

The West Hampstead ward now has relatively few families and a great number of young single people. A large proportion of homes are privately rented and fewer than a quarter of adults are married, compared with more than half for the country as a whole. This socio-economic profile is evident in the upmarket cafés that have lined West End Lane in recent years.

Famous West Hampstead residents have included the singers Dusty Springfield, Joan Armat­rading, Olivia Newton John and Jimmy Somerville, author Doris Lessing, actresses Imelda Staunton and Emma Thompson, and the playwright Joe Orton, who lived on West End Lane with his lover Kenneth Halliwell from 1951 to 1959. Stephen Fry has also lived here.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Earlsfields
TUM image id: 1145
Maygrove Peace Park
TUM image id: 1152
201402160103
TUM image id: 1453363351
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