Odeon Marble Arch

Cinema in/near Marble Arch, existed between 1928 and 2016

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Odeon Marble Arch

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Cinema · * · W2 ·
August
23
2014

The Odeon Marble Arch (known as the Regal 1928-1945) was a cinema located opposite Marble Arch monument at the top of Park Lane, with its main entrance on Edgware Road.

The cinema was first known as the Regal, opening on 29 November 1928 with Al Jolson in The Singing Fool. A 100-foot (30 m) high facade was constructed in Portland stone. The auditorium was a riot of romanesque motifs and faux-decor, owing much to the atmospheric style of the USA. Structured in traditional circle and stalls, the cinema was a notable addition to the West End. It was also fitted with a Christie organ - the largest theatre organ ever built outside the United States fitted with 2,514 pipes, a 32-note carillon (the only real organ-operated carillon in the United Kingdom) and a wide variety of special sound effects to accompany the films.

Within six months of opening, the cinema was taken over by ABC Cinemas, who operated it until early January 1945. It was then taken over by Odeon Cinemas. It was refurbished by the new owners, but shortly before re-opening it was damaged by one of the last V-1 flying bombs to hit London. So it remained closed until September 1945, when it was re-opened as the Odeon Marble Arch and continued as a first-run house.

By the early 1960s its interior was decidedly faded and neglected. Film-runs had by this point declined to minor circuit pictures or even dubbed foreign films: insufficient to fill its large house. So, on 22 March 1964 it closed with The Long Ships, was demolished and replaced by an office block and a new modern cinema, with the architect being T.P. Bennett and Son, capable of playing the new widescreen formats. The new cinema, built above the Marble Arch tube station, required elaborate structural shock absorbers to prevent vibrations from the passing trains from disturbing the film projection.

Opening in 1967, the Odeon was the largest cinema constructed in the post-war years. The cinema was constructed to showcase films in the various 70mm processes, in particular Dimension 150, as well as conventional 35mm films, allowing for considerable spectacle. Presentations included: Far from the Madding Crowd, A Bridge Too Far, Aliens, Die Hard, Return of the Jedi, Lawrence of Arabia. The screen was the largest in the country.

In January 1997, the cinema reopened as a 5 screen multiplex, converted within the existing space.

In March 2011 Odeon Marble Arch had its 35mm projectors and CP65 sound processors removed and went fully digital in all five screens using NEC digital projectors with Doremi servers, Only screen one retained its Victoria 8 35mm projector and Cinemecanica non-rewind system alongside the Digital system for the occasional 35mm shows.

On 8 May 2016, the Odeon Marble Arch within the 1967 building closed its doors for the final time, and was demolished later that year.






Main source: Wikipedia
Further citations and sources




NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Church of the Annunciation The Church of the Annunciation, Marble Arch, is a Church of England parish church designed by Sir Walter Tapper. It is a Grade II* listed building.
Churchill Hotel The Hyatt Regency London - The Churchill is a five star hotel located on Portman Square.
Home House Home House is a Georgian town house at 20 Portman Square.
Marble Arch Marble Arch is a 19th-century white marble faced triumphal arch.
Metropolitan Borough of Westminster The Metropolitan Borough of Westminster was a metropolitan borough in the County of London from 1900 to 1965.
Montagu House Montagu House at 22 Portman Square was a historic London house.
Odeon Marble Arch The Odeon Marble Arch (known as the Regal 1928-1945) was a cinema located opposite Marble Arch monument at the top of Park Lane, with its main entrance on Edgware Road.
Orchard Court Orchard Court is an apartment block off of Portman Square in London. Known in French as Le Verger, it was used during the Second World War as the London base of F section of the Special Operations Executive (SOE).
Somerset House, Park Lane Somerset House was an 18th-century town house on the east side of Park Lane, where it meets Oxford Street, in the Mayfair area of London. It was also known as 40 Park Lane, although a renumbering means that the site is now called 140 Park Lane.
Speakers’ Corner Speakers’ Corner is in the northeast corner of Hyde Park.
St Georges Fields St George’s Fields are a former burial ground of St George’s, Hanover Square, lying between Connaught Street and Bayswater Road.
Tyburn Tyburn was a village of Middlesex close to the current location of Marble Arch and the southern end of Edgware Road.
Western Marble Arch Synagogue The Western Marble Arch Synagogue is a Jewish place of worship in central London.

NEARBY STREETS
Albion Close, W2 Albion Close dates from around 1830.
Albion Mews, W2 Albion Mews is a cobbled cul-de-sac that is approached through an entrance under a building on Albion Street.
Albion Street, W2 Albion Street was laid out over the Pightle field in the late 1820s.
Archery Close, W2 Archery Close is a street in Paddington.
Bakers Mews, W1U Bakers Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Berkeley Mews, W1H Berkeley Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Bilton Towers, W1H Bilton Towers is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Brown Street, W1H Brown Street is a road in the W1H postcode area
Brunswick Mews, W1H Brunswick Mews is a road in the W1H postcode area
Bryanston Mews West, W1H Bryanston Mews West is a road in the W1H postcode area
Bryanston Street, W1C Bryanston Street is a road in the W1C postcode area
Bryanston Street, W1H This is a street in the W1H postcode area
Bryanston Street, W2 Bryanston Street is a road in the W2 postcode area
Burwood Place, W2 Burwood Place is a street in Paddington.
Castlereagh Street, W1H Castlereagh Street is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Clenston Mews, W1H Clenston Mews is a road in the W1H postcode area
Connaught Close, W2 Connaught Close is a cul-de-sac off Connaught Street.
Connaught Place, W2 Connaught Place is a street near to Marble Arch.
Connaught Square, W2 Connaught Square was the first square of city houses to be built in the Bayswater area.
Connaught Street, W2 Connaught Street is a street in Paddington.
Culross Street, W1K Culross Street is a road in the W1K postcode area
Cumberland Mansions, W1H Cumberland Mansions is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Dunraven Street, W1K Dunraven Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Edwards Mews, W1U Edwards Mews is a road in the W1U postcode area
Fitzhardinge House, W1H Residential block
Fitzhardinge Street, W1H Fitzhardinge Street is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Frederick Close, W2 Frederick Close is a street in Paddington.
George Street, W1H George Street is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
George Street, W1U George Street is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
George Street, W2 George Street is a road in the W2 postcode area
Granville Place, W1H Granville Place is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Great Cumberland Place, W1 Great Cumberland Place is one of the streets of London in the W1 postal area.
Great Cumberland Place, W1H Great Cumberland Place is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Green Street, W1K Green Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Grosvenor Square, W1A Grosvenor Square was developed by Sir Richard Grosvenor from 1721 onwards.
Hampden Gurney Street, W1H Hampden Gurney Street is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Hampshire House, W2 Residential block
Harrowby Street, W1H Harrowby Street is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Hyde Park Place, W2 Hyde Park Place is a street in Paddington.
Hyde Park Street, W2 Hyde Park Street is a street in Paddington.
Jones Street, W1K Jones Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Kendal Street, W2 Kendal Street is a street in Paddington.
Lees Place, W1K Lees Place is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Manchester Square, W1U Manchester Square is a small but well-preserved Georgian square in Marylebone.
Marble Arch, W1H Marble Arch is a major road junction in the West End, surrounding the monument of the same name.
Montagu Street, W1H This is a street in the W1H postcode area
New Quebec Street, W1H New Quebec Street is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Norfolk Crescent, W2 Norfolk Crescent is a street in Paddington.
North Audley Street, W1K North Audley Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
North Carriage Drive, W2 North Carriage Drive is a road in the W2 postcode area
North Row, W1K North Row is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Nutford Place, W1H Nutford Place is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Old Quebec Street, W1 Old Quebec Street is a road in the W1 postcode area
Old Quebec Street, W1H Old Quebec Street is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Orchard Court, W1H Orchard Court is a road in the W1H postcode area
Orchard Street, W1H Orchard Street is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Orchard Street, W1K Orchard Street is a road in the W1K postcode area
Oxford Square, W2 Oxford Square is a road in the W2 postcode area
Oxford Street, W1C Oxford Street is Europe’s busiest shopping street, with around half a million daily visitors, and as of 2012 had approximately 300 shops.
Park Lane, W1C Park Lane is a road in the W1C postcode area
Park Steps, W2 Park Steps is a street in Paddington.
Park Street, W1K Park Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Park West Place, W2 Park West Place is a street in Paddington.
Park West, W2 Park West is a street in Paddington.
Porchester Place, W2 Porchester Place is a street in Paddington.
Portman Close, W1U Portman Close is a road in the W1U postcode area
Portman Mews South, W1H Portman Mews South is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Portman Square, W1H Portman Square is a square, part of the Portman Estate, located at the western end of Wigmore Street, which connects it to Cavendish Square to its east.
Portman Street, W1C Portman Street is a road in the W1C postcode area
Portman Street, W1H Portman Street is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Portsea Mews, W2 Portsea Mews is a street in Paddington.
Portsea Place, W2 Portsea Place is a street in Paddington.
Providence Court, W1K This is a street in the W1K postcode area
Quebec Mews, W1H Quebec Mews is a road in the W1H postcode area
Red Place, W1K Red Place is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Reeves Mews, W1K Reeves Mews is a road in the W1K postcode area
Robert Adam Street, W1U Robert Adam Street was the 1938 renamed Adams Street.
Seymour Mews, W1H Seymour Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Seymour Street, SE18 A street within the SE18 postcode
Seymour Street, W1H Seymour Street is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Seymour Street, W2 Seymour Street is a street in Paddington.
Shepards Place, W1K Shepards Place is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Shepherds Place, W1K Shepherds Place is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Spanish Place, W1U Spanish Place is one of the streets of London in the W1U postal area.
Stanhope House, W2 Residential block
Stanhope Place, W2 Stanhope Place is a street in Paddington.
Stourcliffe Street, W1H Stourcliffe Street is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
The Water Gardens, W2 The Water Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Upper Berkeley Street, W1H Upper Berkeley Street is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Upper Brook Street, W1K Upper Brook Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Upper Grosvenor Street, W1K Upper Grosvenor Street is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.
Vincent Court, W1H Vincent Court is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Water Gardens, W2 Water Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Wigmore Street, W1H Wigmore Street is one of the streets of London in the W1H postal area.
Woods Mews, W1K Woods Mews is one of the streets of London in the W1K postal area.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Montagu House, Portman Square
TUM image id: 1510140427
Portman Square, W1H
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