Rayners Crescent, UB5

An area maybe laid out between the wars- in this area, buildings are mainly post-war

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(51.5343 -0.40475) 

Rayners Crescent, UB5

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Road · Northolt · UB5 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Rayners Crescent is one of the streets of London in the UB5 postal area.




NEARBY STREETS
Attlee Court, UB4 A street within the UB4 postcode
Attlee Road, UB4 Attlee Road was named after former Prime Minister Clement Atlee.
Ayles Road, UB4 Walter Ayles was the Labour MP for Southall (1945-1950); then for Hayes and Harlington (1950-1953).
Bankside Avenue, UB5 Bankside Avenue is a road in the UB5 postcode area
Barn Close, UB5 Barn Close is a road in the UB5 postcode area
Bevin Road, UB4 Bevin Road was named after Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin.
Bondfield Avenue, UB4 Margaret Bondfield was an MP, trades unionist and women’s rights activist.
Bournemead Avenue, UB5 Bournemead Avenue is a road in the UB5 postcode area
Bournemead Close, UB5 Bournemead Close is one of the streets of London in the UB5 postal area.
Bournemead Way, UB5 A street within the UB5 postcode
Butts Piece, UB5 A street within the UB5 postcode
Down Close, UB5 A street within the UB5 postcode
Down Way, UB5 Down Way is one of the streets of London in the UB5 postal area.
Edward Road, UB5 Edward Road is one of the streets of London in the UB5 postal area.
Grange Court, UB5 Grange Court is a road in the UB5 postcode area
Greenway, UB4 Greenway is one of the streets of London in the UB4 postal area.
Gurney Road, UB5 Gurney Road is one of the streets of London in the UB5 postal area.
Hartfield Avenue, UB5 Hartfield Avenue is one of the streets of London in the UB5 postal area.
Henderson Road, UB4 Henderson Road is a road in the UB4 postcode area
Keir Hardie Way, UB4 Keir Hardie Way is named for the Labour politician.
Kingshill Avenue, UB4 Kingshill Avenue is one of the streets of London in the UB5 postal area.
Longhook Gardens, UB5 Longhook Gardens is a road in the UB5 postcode area
Montcalm Close, UB4 Montcalm Close is a road in the UB4 postcode area
Morrison Road, UB4 Herbert Morrison was UK Transport Secretary (1929-1931), Home Secretary (1940-1945) and Deputy Prime Minister (1945-1951).
Rayners Cresent, UB5 Rayners Cresent is one of the streets of London in the UB5 postal area.
Rayners Gardens, UB5 Rayners Gardens is a road in the UB5 postcode area
Redman Close, UB5 Redman Close is a road in the UB5 postcode area
Rushdene Close, UB5 Rushdene Close is a road in the UB5 postcode area
Rushdene Crescent, UB5 Rushdene Crescent is a road in the UB5 postcode area
Rushdene Cresent, UB5 Rushdene Cresent is one of the streets of London in the UB5 postal area.
Tithe Barn Way, UB5 A street within the UB5 postcode
Townson Avenue, UB5 Townson Avenue is one of the streets of London in the UB5 postal area.
Townson Way, UB5 Townson Way is a road in the UB5 postcode area
Trevor Close, UB5 Trevor Close is one of the streets of London in the UB5 postal area.
Trevor Gardens, UB5 A street within the UB5 postcode
Vancouver Road, UB4 Vancouver Road is a road in the UB4 postcode area
Webbs Road, UB4 A street within the UB4 postcode
Welbeck Court, UB4 Welbeck Court is one of the streets of London in the UB4 postal area.
Westend Gardens, UB5 A street within the UB5 postcode
Wolfe Close, UB4 A street within the UB4 postcode


Northolt

Northolt may date from as early as the eighth century.

Archaeological evidence suggests that the Northol’s origin was an 8th century Saxon village behind the modern Court Farm Road. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book as Northala.

Northolt Manor was built in the fourteenth century and provides much of the archaeological information of the area from its excavations in the 1950s and after. A Tudor barn built in 1595 from Smith’s Farm in Northolt is now on display at the Chiltern Open Air Museum.

During the early part of the 18th century farmland was enclosed in order to provide hay for the City of London, alongside crops such as peas and beans.

In 1795, parliamentary approval was obtained for the construction of the Paddington Arm of the Grand Union Canal. The route passes through Northolt from Hayes to Paddington opened in 1801.

Suburban development began in the 1920s. Most of the housing north of the Western Avenue was built in the 1920s–1930s, and is in the private housing sector. Most of the housing built to the south of the Western Avenue was built in the 1960s–1970s, and is in the social housing sectors, particularly along the Kensington and Ruislip Roads.

The Great Central Railway line opened in 1906, passing through Northolt on its way from Marylebone to High Wycombe. 1906 also saw the Great Western Railway’s New North Main Line pass through south of Great Central Railway on its way to Birmingham. The following year Northolt Halt opened on it, eventually becoming Northolt station. In 1938 an extension to the Central line, transformed it into Northolt tube station.

In the 21st century, a new large private housing development was built on the former site of the Taylor Woodrow company, adjacent to the Grand Union Canal. This development is known as ’Grand Union Village’.


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