Redcliffe Gardens, SW10

Road in/near Chelsea, existing between 1865 and now

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Road · Chelsea · SW10 ·
JUNE
25
2015

Redcliffe Gardens began life as Walnut Tree Walk, a pathway running through nurseries and market gardens.

The street, built between 1865 and 1873, is characterised by a wide street, mature trees, ample front gardens and large gault brick houses arranged as detached houses, pairs, groups of three and terraces.

Redcliffe Gardens is home to Redcliffe School’s prep school.


Main source: Redcliffe Gardens - Wikipedia
Further citations and sources


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963�’65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply
Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 26 Mar 2023 14:50 GMT   

Albert Mews
It is not a gargoyle over the entrance arch to Albert Mews, it is a likeness of Prince Albert himself.

Reply

LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Loraine Brocklehurst    
Added: 24 May 2023 14:00 GMT   

Holcombe Road, N17
I lived at 23Holcombe Rd. with my parents, Grandfather , Aunt and Uncle in 1954. My Aunt and Uncle lived there until it was demolished. I’m not sure what year that was as we emigrated to Canada.

Reply

Jen Williams   
Added: 20 May 2023 17:27 GMT   

Corfield Street, E2
My mother was born in 193 Corfield Street in 1920.Her father was a policeman.

Reply

sofia   
Added: 19 May 2023 08:57 GMT   

43 MELLITUS STREET
43 MELLITUS STREET

Reply

   
Added: 17 May 2023 11:50 GMT   

Milson Road (1908 - 1954)
My grandparents and great grandparents and great great grandparents the Manley family lived at 33 Milson Road from 1908 to 1935. My grandad was born at 33 Milson Road. His parents George and Grace had all four of their chidren there. When his father Edward died his mother moved to 67 Milson in 1935 Road and lived there until 1954 (records found so far, it may be longer). Before that they lived in the Porten Road. I wonder if there is anyone that used to know them? My grandad was Charles ’Ted’ Manley, his parents were called George and Grace and George’s parents were called Edward and Bessie. George worked in a garage and Edward was a hairdresser.

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 16 Apr 2023 15:55 GMT   

Rendlesham Road, E5
I lived at 14 Rendlesham Road in the 1940s and 50s. The house belonged to my grandfather James Grosvenor who bought it in the 1920s for £200.I had a brother who lived in property until 1956 when he married. Local families were the paisleys, the Jenners and the family of Christopher Gable.

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Comment
Sandra Field   
Added: 15 Apr 2023 16:15 GMT   

Removal Order
Removal order from Shoreditch to Holborn, Jane Emma Hall, Single, 21 Pregnant. Born about 21 years since in Masons place in the parish of St Lukes.

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Comment
Sue Germain   
Added: 10 Apr 2023 08:35 GMT   

Southwood Road, SE9
My great great grandfather lived in Time Villa, Southwood Rd around 1901. He owned several coffee houses in Whitechapel and in South London, including New Time Coffee House so either his house was named after the coffee house or vice versa.

Reply

David Gleeson   
Added: 7 Apr 2023 22:19 GMT   

MBE from Campbell Bunk (1897 - 1971)
Walter Smith born at 43 Campbell Bunk was awarded the MBE in january honours list in 1971. A local councillor for services to the public.

Reply


NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Goodwins Field - a field with a story.
Coleherne House Coleherne House once stood on the corner of Brompton Lane (later Brompton Road) and Walnut Tree Lane (now Redcliffe Gardens).
Kensington Canal The Kensington Canal was a canal, about two miles long, opened in 1828 in London from the River Thames at Chelsea, along the line of Counter’s Creek, to a basin near Warwick Road in Kensington.

NEARBY STREETS
Adrian Mews, SW10 Adrian Mews is a small mews off of Ifield Road.
Ashberg House, SW10 Ashberg House is located on Cathcart Road.
Bolton Gardens Mews, SW10 Bolton Gardens Mews is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Boltons Court, SW5 Boltons Court is a block on Old Brompton Road.
Boltons Place, SW5 Boltons Place is a road in the SW5 postcode area
Brockhurst House, SW10 Brockhurst House is a block on Fulham Road.
Brompton Park Crescent, SW6 Brompton Park Crescent is in the Fulham area
Carmichael Close, SW10 A street within the SW10 postcode
Cathcart Road, SW10 Cathcart Road is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Coleherne Mews, SW10 Coleherne Mews is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Coleherne Road, SW10 Coleherne Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Cranley Mews, SW7 Cranley Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW7 postal area.
Cresswell Gardens, SW10 Cresswell Gardens is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Cresswell Place, SW10 Cresswell Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Drayton Gardens, SW10 Drayton Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Eagle Place, SW7 This is a street in the SW7 postcode area
Earls Court Square, SW5 Earls Court Square is a residential square
East House, SW10 East House is a block on Cresswell Place.
East House, SW5 East House is a block on The Boltons.
East Terrace, SW10 East Terrace is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Edith Yard Edith Grove, SW10 Edith Yard Edith Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Esher House, SW10 Residential block
Euro House, SW5 Euro House is a block on Warwick Road.
Farnell Mews, SW5 Farnell Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW5 postal area.
Farrier Walk, SW10 Farrier Walk is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Fawcett Street, SW10 Fawcett Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Fernshaw Close, SW10 Fernshaw Close is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Finborough Road, SW10 Finborough Road derives its name from the country seat in Suffolk of the local landowning Pettiward family.
Fulham Road, SW10 Fulham Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Gertrude Street, SW10 Gertrude Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Gilston Road, SW10 Gilston Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Grove Court, SW10 Grove Court is a block on Drayton Gardens.
Harcourt Terrace, SW10 Harcourt Terrace is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Harley Gardens, SW10 Harley Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Holly Mews, SW10 Holly Mews is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Hollywood Mews, SW10 Hollywood Mews is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Hollywood Road, SW10 Hollywood Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Hunter House, SW5 Hunter House is sited on Old Brompton Road.
Ifield Road, SW10 Ifield Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Kempsford Gardens, SW5 Kempsford Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW5 postal area.
Kramer Mews, SW5 Kramer Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW5 postal area.
Langham Mansions, SW5 Langham Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW5 postal area.
Lee House, SW10 Lee House is a block on Drayton Gardens.
Lille Square, SW6 Lille Square is part of Fulham
London House, SW10 Residential block
Milborne Grove, SW10 Milborne Grove was built between 1851 and 1862.
Munro Terrace, SW10 Munro Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Netherton Grove, SW10 Netherton Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Nightingale Place, SW10 Nightingale Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Old Brompton Road, SW5 Old Brompton Road is one of the streets of London in the SW5 postal area.
Owen Close, SW10 Owen Close is a road in the UB4 postcode area
Penywern Road, SW5 Penywern Road is one of the streets of London in the SW5 postal area.
Priory Walk, SW10 Priory Walk and Milborne Grove both have development on one side of the road only and together they book-end Harley Gardens.
Pullman Court, SW10 Pullman Court is a block on Drayton Gardens.
Redcliffe Close, SW5 Redcliffe Close is one of the streets of London in the SW5 postal area.
Redcliffe Mews, SW10 Redcliffe Mews runs behind Harcourt Terrace.
Redcliffe Place, SW10 Redcliffe Place is named after its architect’s recent brief to design a church in the Redcliffe area of Bristol.
Redcliffe Road, SW10 Redcliffe Road is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Redcliffe Square, SW10 Redcliffe Square was built as part of the Gunter estate in the 1860s.
Redcliffe Street, SW10 Redcliffe Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Roland Gardens, SW7 Roland Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW7 postal area.
Roland Way, SW7 Roland Way is one of the streets of London in the SW7 postal area.
Seagrave Road, SW6 Seagrave Road is a location in Fulham
Seymour Walk, SW10 Seymour Walk was almost entirely built between the 1790s-1820s in an area then known as Little Chelsea.
Shalcomb Street, SW10 Shalcomb Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Sibyl Thorndike Casson House, SW5 Sibyl Thorndike Casson House is a block on Kramer Mews.
South Bolton Gardens, SW5 South Bolton Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW5 postal area.
South Walk, SW10 South Walk is a road in the SW10 postcode area
St Lukes Church Hall, SW10 St Lukes Church Hall is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
The Boltons, SW10 The Boltons is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
The Little Boltons, SW10 The Little Boltons - originally called "The Grove" - connects Old Brompton Road with Tregunter Road.
The Mansions, SW5 The Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW5 postal area.
Thistle Grove, SW7 Thistle Grove was a rural track before the area was urbanised in the 1860s.
Tregunter Road, SW10 Development began at the east end of Tregunter Road in 1851 and was complete by 1866 at the west end.
Warner House, SW10 Warner House is a block on Priory Walk.
Weir Road, SW5 Weir Road is a road in the SW17 postcode area
Westgate Terrace, SW10 Westgate Terrace is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Wetherby Mansions, SW5 Wetherby Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW5 postal area.
Wetherby Mews, SW5 Wetherby Mews is a road in the SW5 postcode area
Wharfedale Street, SW10 This is a street in the SW10 postcode area
Whistler Walk, SW10 Whistler Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Yale House, SW5 Yale House is a block on Old Brompton Road.

NEARBY PUBS


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Chelsea

Chelsea is an affluent area, bounded to the south by the River Thames.

Its eastern boundary was once defined by the River Westbourne, which is now in a pipe above Sloane Square tube station. The modern eastern boundary is Chelsea Bridge Road and the lower half of Sloane Street, including Sloane Square, along with parts of Belgravia. To the north and northwest, the area fades into Knightsbridge and South Kensington, but it is safe to say that the area north of King’s Road as far northwest as Fulham Road is part of Chelsea.

The word Chelsea originates from the Old English term for chalk and landing place on the river. The first record of the Manor of Chelsea precedes the Domesday Book and records the fact that Thurstan, governor of the King’s Palace during the reign of Edward the Confessor (1042–1066), gave the land to the Abbot and Convent of Westminster. Abbot Gervace subsequently assigned the manor to his mother, and it passed into private ownership. The modern-day Chelsea hosted the Synod of Chelsea in 787 AD.

Chelsea once had a reputation for the manufacture of Chelsea buns (made from a long strip of sweet dough tightly coiled, with currants trapped between the layers, and topped with sugar).

King Henry VIII acquired the manor of Chelsea from Lord Sandys in 1536; Chelsea Manor Street is still extant. Two of King Henry’s wives, Catherine Parr and Anne of Cleves, lived in the Manor House; Princess Elizabeth – the future Queen Elizabeth I – resided there; and Thomas More lived more or less next door at Beaufort House. In 1609 James I established a theological college on the site of the future Chelsea Royal Hospital, which Charles II founded in 1682.

By 1694, Chelsea – always a popular location for the wealthy, and once described as ’a village of palaces’ – had a population of 3000. Even so, Chelsea remained rural and served London to the east as a market garden, a trade that continued until the 19th-century development boom which caused the final absorption of the district into the metropolis.

Chelsea shone, brightly but briefly, in the 1960s Swinging London period and the early 1970s. The Swinging Sixties was defined on King’s Road, which runs the length of the area. The Western end of Chelsea featured boutiques Granny Takes a Trip and The Sweet Shop, the latter of which sold medieval silk velvet caftans, tabards and floor cushions, with many of the cultural cognoscenti of the time being customers, including Keith Richards, Twiggy and many others.

The exclusivity of Chelsea as a result of its high property prices has historically resulted in the term Sloane Ranger to be used to describe its residents. From 2011, Channel 4 broadcast a reality television show called Made in Chelsea, documenting the ’glitzy’ lives of several young people living in Chelsea. Moreover, Chelsea is home to one of the largest communities of Americans living outside of the United States, with 6.53% of Chelsea-residents being born in the United States.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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The Dancing Platform at Cremorne Gardens (1864) In the 17th century, Chelsea Farm was formed and the area was used for market gardening plots, supplying central London. In 1778, Lord Cremorne bought Chelsea Farm and Cremorne House was built. In 1830 Charles Random de Berenger, a colourful character implicated in financial fraud during the Napoleonic War, purchased Cremorne House. He was a keen sportsman and opened a sports club know as Cremorne Stadium for ‘skilful and manly exercise’ including shooting, sailing, archery and fencing. In 1846, De Berenger’s Cremorne Stadium was transformed into a pleasure garden which became a popular and noisy place of entertainment. The entertainment included a diverse range of activities including concerts, fireworks, balloon ascents, galas and theatre.
Credit: Phoebus Levin
TUM image id: 1526047056
Licence:
Earl’s Court, District Line
TUM image id: 1660570712
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Map of the Kensington Canal area.
Credit: John Greenwood
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Springtime, Earl’s Court
Credit: IG/MrLondon
Licence:


Finborough Road, Chelsea
Credit: Nancy Weir Huntly (1890-1963)
Licence:


Kenway Road (1970)
Credit: British History Online
Licence:


24-hour potato service on the King’s Road, Chelsea (1962)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Here is the original Earl’s Court entrance from 1871. With the coming of the Piccadilly Tube, the station moved across the road to the current one.
Licence:


Plan of the Redcliffe Estate, developed by Corbett and McClymont, 1860s. Until the development in the 1860s, the area was entirely rural, with villages at Earl’s Court and Little Chelsea, and the intervening land occupied by market gardens, grassland and paddocks.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Graffiti, Raasay Street, Chelsea (1969).
Credit: Roger Perry
Licence:


Earl’s Court, District Line
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Walham Green station platform (1939)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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