Battersea Bridge (1860)

Image dated 1860

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  ·  MAPS  ·  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.48312 -0.17088, 51.483 -0.17) 
MAP YEAR:175018001810182018301860190019502022Show map without markers
ZOOM:14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 18 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 18
TIP: To create your own sharable map, right click on the map
Photo taken in a southwesterly direction · Chelsea · SW3 ·
MAY
9
2019

Photo of Battersea Bridge, taken from Chelsea in the 1860s by James Hedderly.

James Hedderly was a photographer active in Chelsea before the building of the Embankment and afterwards.

This is a view taken from the tower of Chelsea Old Church. It shows the tangle of closely-packed houses and wharves between Cheyne Walk and Beaufort Street before the embankment. Beyond are the larger houses of Lindsey Row and the trees of Cremorne Gardens.

Alas, in this instance, the Google Street View associated automatically with the location is of no use. It is some 80 metres below the position of the original photographer. And even so, that darned house is in the way!


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 505 completed street histories and 46995 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

Reply
Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963’65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

Reply
Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

Reply

LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Julie   
Added: 22 Sep 2022 18:30 GMT   

Well Walk, NW3 (1817 - 1818)
The home of Benthy, the Postman, with whom poet John Keats and his brother Tom lodged from early 1817 to Dec., 1818. They occupied the first floor up. Here Tom died Dec. 1, 1818. It was next door to the Welles Tavern then called ’The Green Man’."

From collected papers and photos re: No. 1 Well Walk at the library of Harvard University.

Source: No. 1, Well Walk, Hampstead. | HOLLIS for

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 4 Sep 2022 15:42 GMT   

Superman 2
I worked here in 1977. The scene in the prison laundry in Superman 2 was filmed here.

Reply

TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 15:19 GMT   

Bus makes a leap
A number 78 double-decker bus driven by Albert Gunter was forced to jump an accidentally opening Tower Bridge.

He was awarded a £10 bonus.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:44 GMT   

The world’s first underground train
The very first underground train left Paddington on the new Metropolitan Railway bound for Farringdon Street.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:41 GMT   

Baker Street
Baker Street station opened on the Metropolitan Railway - the world’s first underground line.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:17 GMT   

TV comes to Olympia
Over 7000 people queued to see the first high definition television pictures on sets at the Olympia Radio Show. The pictures were transmitted by the BBC from Alexandra Palace, introduced by Leslie Mitchell, their first announcer.

Reply
Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
The Fascination of Chelsea The Fascination of Chelsea was a book published in 1902.
The Prince Albert Originally called the Albert Tavern, the Prince Albert public house is a three storey building dating from 1866-68.

NEARBY STREETS
Albion Riverside Building, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Albion Riverside, SW11 Albion Riverside is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Alpha Place, SW3 Alpha Place was probably so called because it was the first turning to be built out of the old lane now named Flood Street.
Anhalt Road, SW11 Anhalt Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Ann Lane, SW10 Ann Lane is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Battersea Bridge, SW11 Battersea Bridge connects Battersea and Chelsea with the first bridge dating from 1771.
Battersea Bridge, SW3 Battersea Bridge, a five-span arch bridge with cast-iron girders and granite piers links Battersea south of the River Thames with Chelsea to the north.
Beaufort Street, SW3 Beaufort Street was laid out in 1766 on the site of Beaufort House.
Blantyre Street, SW10 Blantyre Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Bramerton Street, SW3 Bramerton Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Cadogan Pier, SW3 Cadogan Pier is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Carlyle Square, SW3 Carlyle Square was named in honour of the writer Thomas Carlyle in 1872.
Caversham Street, SW3 Caversham Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Chapel Walk, SW3 Chapel Walk is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Chelsea Crescent, SW10 Chelsea Crescent is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Chelsea Manor Gardens, SW3 Chelsea Manor Gardens is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Chelsea Park Gardens, SW3 Chelsea Park Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Chelsea Towers, SW3 Chelsea Towers are named blocks in Chelsea.
Cheyne Court, SW3 Cheyne Court is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Cheyne Mews, SW3 Cheyne Mews is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Cheyne Row, SW3 Cheyne Row is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Cheyne Walk, SW10 Cheyne Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Cheyne Walk, SW3 Cheyne Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Christchurch Street, SW3 Christchurch Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Christchurch Terrace, SW3 Christchurch Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Danvers Street, SW3 Sir John Danvers (died 1655) introduced Italian gardens to England in his mansion Danvers House whose grounds spread from the river to the Kings Road.
Elcho Street, SW11 Elcho Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Elm Park Lane, SW10 Elm Park Lane is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Elm Park Mansions, SW10 Elm Park Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Elm Park Road, SW3 Elm Park Road is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Flood Street, SW3 Flood Street commemorates Luke Thomas Flood (d.1860) a major Chelsea land owner and a benefactor of the poor.
Flood Walk, SW3 Flood Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Glebe Place, SW3 Glebe Place was built over a former road called Cooks Ground.
Great Eastern Wharf, SW11 Great Eastern Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Grove Cottages, SW3 Grove Cottages is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Hester Road, SW11 Hester Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Justice Walk, SW3 Justice Walk links Old Church Street and Lawrence Street.
Lawrence Street, SW3 Lawrence Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Lordship Place, SW3 This is a street in the SW3 postcode area
Mallord Street, SW3 Mallord Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Margaretta Terrace, SW3 Margaretta Terrace is a location in London.
Milmans Street, SW10 Milmans Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Moravian Place, SW10 Moravian Place is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Mulberry Walk, SW3 Mulberry Walk is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Oakley Gardens, SW3 Oakley Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Oakley Street, SW3 Oakley Street arrived in 1830 following the demolition of Chelsea Manor House in 1822.
Old Church Street, SW3 Old Church Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Park Walk, SW10 Park Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Park Walk, SW3 Park Walk is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Paultons Square, SW3 Paultons Square, a garden square, was built in 1836–40 on the site of a former market garden.
Paultons Street, SW3 Paultons Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Petyt Place, SW3 Petyt Place is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Phene Street, SW3 Phene Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Pier House, SW3 Pier House is a block on Oakley Street
Porters Lodge, SW3 Porters Lodge is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Rainsome Dock, SW11 Rainsome Dock is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Ramsay Mews, SW3 Ramsay Mews is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Ransomes Dock, SW11 Ransomes Dock is a development in Battersea.
Redburn Street, SW3 Redburn Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Redesdale Street, SW3 Redesdale Street is a location in London.
Resedale Street, SW3 Resedale Street is a location in London.
Riley Street, SW10 Riley Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Riverside, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Robinson Street, SW3 Robinson Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Rosetti Studios, SW3 Rosetti Studios is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Rossetti Studios, SW3 Rossetti Studios is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
St Loo Avenue, SW3 St Loo Avenue was named after William St Loo, the third husband of Bess of Hardwick.
St Mary Le Park Court, SW11 St Mary Le Park Court is a block on Albert Bridge Road.
Tedworth Gardens, SW3 Tedworth Gardens is a road in the SW3 postcode area
The Courtyard, SW3 The Courtyard is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
The Vale, SW3 The Vale is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Trident Place, SW3 Trident Place is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Upper Cheyne Row, SW3 Upper Cheyne Row is a road in the SW3 postcode area

NEARBY PUBS
Azteca This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Beaufort House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Cross Keys This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Prince Albert This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Raffles Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Riley’s This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Cadogan Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Coopers Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Ivy Chelsea Garden This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Phene This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Pig’s Ear This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Prince Albert Originally called the Albert Tavern, the Prince Albert public house is a three storey building dating from 1866-68.


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 505 completed street histories and 46995 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


Chelsea

Chelsea is an affluent area, bounded to the south by the River Thames.

Its eastern boundary was once defined by the River Westbourne, which is now in a pipe above Sloane Square tube station. The modern eastern boundary is Chelsea Bridge Road and the lower half of Sloane Street, including Sloane Square, along with parts of Belgravia. To the north and northwest, the area fades into Knightsbridge and South Kensington, but it is safe to say that the area north of King’s Road as far northwest as Fulham Road is part of Chelsea.

The word Chelsea originates from the Old English term for chalk and landing place on the river. The first record of the Manor of Chelsea precedes the Domesday Book and records the fact that Thurstan, governor of the King’s Palace during the reign of Edward the Confessor (1042–1066), gave the land to the Abbot and Convent of Westminster. Abbot Gervace subsequently assigned the manor to his mother, and it passed into private ownership. The modern-day Chelsea hosted the Synod of Chelsea in 787 AD.

Chelsea once had a reputation for the manufacture of Chelsea buns (made from a long strip of sweet dough tightly coiled, with currants trapped between the layers, and topped with sugar).

King Henry VIII acquired the manor of Chelsea from Lord Sandys in 1536; Chelsea Manor Street is still extant. Two of King Henry’s wives, Catherine Parr and Anne of Cleves, lived in the Manor House; Princess Elizabeth – the future Queen Elizabeth I – resided there; and Thomas More lived more or less next door at Beaufort House. In 1609 James I established a theological college on the site of the future Chelsea Royal Hospital, which Charles II founded in 1682.

By 1694, Chelsea – always a popular location for the wealthy, and once described as ’a village of palaces’ – had a population of 3000. Even so, Chelsea remained rural and served London to the east as a market garden, a trade that continued until the 19th-century development boom which caused the final absorption of the district into the metropolis.

Chelsea shone, brightly but briefly, in the 1960s Swinging London period and the early 1970s. The Swinging Sixties was defined on King’s Road, which runs the length of the area. The Western end of Chelsea featured boutiques Granny Takes a Trip and The Sweet Shop, the latter of which sold medieval silk velvet caftans, tabards and floor cushions, with many of the cultural cognoscenti of the time being customers, including Keith Richards, Twiggy and many others.

The exclusivity of Chelsea as a result of its high property prices has historically resulted in the term Sloane Ranger to be used to describe its residents. From 2011, Channel 4 broadcast a reality television show called Made in Chelsea, documenting the ’glitzy’ lives of several young people living in Chelsea. Moreover, Chelsea is home to one of the largest communities of Americans living outside of the United States, with 6.53% of Chelsea-residents being born in the United States.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Click here to see map view of nearby Creative Commons images
Click here to see Creative Commons images near to this postcode
The Dancing Platform at Cremorne Gardens (1864) In the 17th century, Chelsea Farm was formed and the area was used for market gardening plots, supplying central London. In 1778, Lord Cremorne bought Chelsea Farm and Cremorne House was built. In 1830 Charles Random de Berenger, a colourful character implicated in financial fraud during the Napoleonic War, purchased Cremorne House. He was a keen sportsman and opened a sports club know as Cremorne Stadium for ‘skilful and manly exercise’ including shooting, sailing, archery and fencing. In 1846, De Berenger’s Cremorne Stadium was transformed into a pleasure garden which became a popular and noisy place of entertainment. The entertainment included a diverse range of activities including concerts, fireworks, balloon ascents, galas and theatre.
Credit: Phoebus Levin
TUM image id: 1526047056
Licence:
The Fascination of Chelsea
TUM image id: 1524258115
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Elm Park Gardens
TUM image id: 1573064988
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Petworth Street sign
TUM image id: 1493989872
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Albert Bridge opened in 1873 and was immediately designated as a dangerous structure. It was noticed early on that vibrations could threaten the structural integrity of the bridge.
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence:


The Fascination of Chelsea
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Elm Park Gardens
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Rosenau Road, SW11 Schloss Rosenau is a castle, formerly in Saxe-Coburg, now lying in Bavaria. Schloss Rosenau was the boyhood home of Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, who became the husband of Queen Victoria. Due to the name of nearby Albert Bridge, builders rook the opportunity to call many of the roads of this area of Battersea after connections with the Prince Consort.
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence:


Old Battersea Bridge, Walter Greaves (oil on canvas, 1874) Old Battersea Bridge, seen from upstream, on Lindsey Row (now Cheyne Walk), with Battersea on the far shore. The boatyard belonging to the Greaves family is in the foreground. On the extreme left is the wall surrounding the garden of the artist William Bell Scott. In the far distance Crystal Palace is just visible. Battersea Bridge was demolished in 1881, and replaced with the present bridge. Before the alterations Greaves recalled the danger to shipping and the difficulty of steering through the arches unless the ‘set of the tide was known’.
Credit: Tate Gallery
Licence:


Battersea Bridge, a painting by John Atkinson Grimshaw (1885)
Credit: The Maas Gallery
Licence:


Justice Walk links Old Church Street and Lawrence Street. It has stayed relatively untouched, a reminder of early 19th century Chelsea. The cellar under the Wesleyan Chapel, seen on the right, was used as a soup kitchen for the poor. The chapel was relocated to the corner of Chelsea Manor Street and King’s Road circa 1900. H. Allen Smith, wine merchants, occupied the premise from 1903 to 1985. According to local legend, a courthouse with a gaol beneath occupied this site in 18th century. Prisoners were led through a tunnel to boats moored on the river to be transported to Australia.
Credit: William Walter Burgess c.1890
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Albert Bridge Road at the former end of Ethelburga Street (1958)
Credit: Gwyneth Wexler
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Print-friendly version of this page

  Contact us · Copyright policy · Privacy policy