Chaucer Gardens, E1

Road in/near Aldgate East

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(51.51454 -0.068454, 51.514 -0.068) 
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Road · Aldgate East · E1 ·
December
29
2020

Chaucer Gardens is a location in London.





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Tricia   
Added: 27 Apr 2021 12:05 GMT   

St George in the East Church
This Church was opened in 1729, designed by Hawksmore. Inside destroyed by incendrie bomb 16th April 1941. Rebuilt inside and finished in 1964. The building remained open most of the time in a temporary prefab.

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Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

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Marion James   
Added: 12 Mar 2021 17:43 GMT   

26 Edith Street Haggerston
On Monday 11th October 1880 Charlotte Alice Haynes was born at 26 Edith Street Haggerston the home address of her parents her father Francis Haynes a Gilder by trade and her mother Charlotte Alice Haynes and her two older siblings Francis & George who all welcomed the new born baby girl into the world as they lived in part of the small Victorian terraced house which was shared by another family had an outlook view onto the world of the Imperial Gas Works site - a very grey drab reality of the life they were living as an East End working class family - 26 Edith Street no longer stands in 2021 - the small rundown polluted terrace houses of Edith Street are long since gone along with the Gas Companies buildings to be replaced with green open parkland that is popular in 21st century by the trendy residents of today - Charlotte Alice Haynes (1880-1973) is the wife of my Great Grand Uncle Henry Pickett (1878-1930) As I research my family history I slowly begin to understand the life my descendants had to live and the hardships that they went through to survive - London is my home and there are many areas of this great city I find many of my descendants living working and dying in - I am yet to find the golden chalice! But in all truthfulness my family history is so much more than hobby its an understanding of who I am as I gather their stories. Did Charlotte Alice Pickett nee Haynes go on to live a wonderful life - no I do not think so as she became a widow in 1930 worked in a canteen and never remarried living her life in and around Haggerston & Hackney until her death in 1973 with her final resting place at Manor Park Cemetery - I think Charlotte most likely excepted her lot in life like many women from her day, having been born in the Victorian era where the woman had less choice and standing in society, which is a sad state of affairs - So I will endeavour to write about Charlotte and the many other women in my family history to give them the voice of a life they so richly deserve to be recorded !

Edith Street was well situated for the new public transport of two railway stations in 1880 :- Haggerston Railway Station opened in 1867 & Cambridge Heath Railway Station opened in 1872


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Michael Upham   
Added: 16 Jan 2023 21:16 GMT   

Bala Place, SE16
My grandfather was born at 2 Bala Place.

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Born here
Beverly Sand   
Added: 3 Apr 2021 17:19 GMT   

Havering Street, E1
My mother was born at 48 Havering Street. That house no longer exists. It disappeared from the map by 1950. Family name Schneider, mother Ray and father Joe. Joe’s parents lived just up the road at 311 Cable Street

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

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Added: 15 Jan 2023 09:49 GMT   

The Bombing of Nant Street WW2
My uncle with his young son and baby daughter were killed in the bombing of Nant Street in WW2. His wife had gone to be with her mother whilst the bombing of the area was taking place, and so survived. Cannot imagine how she felt when she returned to see her home flattened and to be told of the death of her husband and children.


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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 15:19 GMT   

Bus makes a leap
A number 78 double-decker bus driven by Albert Gunter was forced to jump an accidentally opening Tower Bridge.

He was awarded a £10 bonus.

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Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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fariba   
Added: 28 Jun 2021 00:48 GMT   

Tower Bridge Business Complex, S
need for my coursework

Source: university

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Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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Christine D Elliott   
Added: 20 Mar 2023 15:52 GMT   

The Blute Family
My grandparents, Frederick William Blute & Alice Elizabeth Blute nee: Warnham lived at 89 Blockhouse Street Deptford from around 1917.They had six children. 1. Alice Maragret Blute (my mother) 2. Frederick William Blute 3. Charles Adrian Blute 4. Violet Lillian Blute 5. Donald Blute 6. Stanley Vincent Blute (Lived 15 months). I lived there with my family from 1954 (Birth) until 1965 when we were re-housed for regeneration to the area.
I attended Ilderton Road School.
Very happy memories of that time.

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Pearl Foster   
Added: 20 Mar 2023 12:22 GMT   

Dukes Place, EC3A
Until his death in 1767, Daniel Nunes de Lara worked from his home in Dukes Street as a Pastry Cook. It was not until much later the street was renamed Dukes Place. Daniel and his family attended the nearby Bevis Marks synagogue for Sephardic Jews. The Ashkenazi Great Synagogue was established in Duke Street, which meant Daniel’s business perfectly situated for his occupation as it allowed him to cater for both congregations.

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Dr Paul Flewers   
Added: 9 Mar 2023 18:12 GMT   

Some Brief Notes on Hawthorne Close / Hawthorne Street
My great-grandparents lived in the last house on the south side of Hawthorne Street, no 13, and my grandmother Alice Knopp and her brothers and sisters grew up there. Alice Knopp married Charles Flewers, from nearby Hayling Road, and moved to Richmond, Surrey, where I was born. Leonard Knopp married Esther Gutenberg and lived there until the street was demolished in the mid-1960s, moving on to Tottenham. Uncle Len worked in the fur trade, then ran a pet shop in, I think, the Kingsland Road.

From the back garden, one could see the almshouses in the Balls Pond Road. There was an ink factory at the end of the street, which I recall as rather malodorous.

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KJH   
Added: 7 Mar 2023 17:14 GMT   

Andover Road, N7 (1939 - 1957)
My aunt, Doris nee Curtis (aka Jo) and her husband John Hawkins (aka Jack) ran a small general stores at 92 Andover Road (N7). I have found details in the 1939 register but don’t know how long before that it was opened.He died in 1957. In the 1939 register he is noted as being an ARP warden for Islington warden

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Added: 2 Mar 2023 13:50 GMT   

The Queens Head
Queens Head demolished and a NISA supermarket and flats built in its place.

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Mike   
Added: 28 Feb 2023 18:09 GMT   

6 Elia Street
When I was young I lived in 6 Elia Street. At the end of the garden there was a garage owned by Initial Laundries which ran from an access in Quick Street all the way up to the back of our garden. The fire exit to the garage was a window leading into our garden. 6 Elia Street was owned by Initial Laundry.

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Fumblina   
Added: 21 Feb 2023 11:39 GMT   

Error on 1800 map numbering for John Street
The 1800 map of Whitfield Street (17 zoom) has an error in the numbering shown on the map. The houses are numbered up the right hand side of John Street and Upper John Street to #47 and then are numbered down the left hand side until #81 BUT then continue from 52-61 instead of 82-91.

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P Cash   
Added: 19 Feb 2023 08:03 GMT   

Occupants of 19-29 Woburn Place
The Industrial Tribunals (later changed to Employment Tribunals) moved (from its former location on Ebury Bridge Road to 19-29 Woburn Place sometime in the late 1980s (I believe).

19-29 Woburn Place had nine floors in total (one in the basement and two in its mansard roof and most of the building was occupied by the Tribunals

The ’Head Office’ of the tribunals, occupied space on the 7th, 6th and 2nd floors, whilst one of the largest of the regional offices (London North but later called London Central) occupied space in the basement, ground and first floor.

The expansive ground floor entrance had white marble flooring and a security desk. Behind (on evey floor) lay a square (& uncluttered) lobby space, which was flanked on either side by lifts. On the rear side was an elegant staircase, with white marble steps, brass inlays and a shiny brass handrail which spiralled around an open well. Both staircase, stairwell and lifts ran the full height of the building. On all floors from 1st upwards, staff toilets were tucked on either side of the staircase (behind the lifts).

Basement Floor - Tribunal hearing rooms, dormant files store and secure basement space for Head Office. Public toilets.

Geound Floor - The ’post’ roon sat next to the entrance in the northern side, the rest of which was occupied by the private offices of the full time Tribunal judiciary. Thw largest office belonged to the Regional Chair and was situated on the far corner (overlooking Tavistock Square) The secretary to the Regional Chair occupied a small office next door.
The south side of this floor was occupied by the large open plan General Office for the administration, a staff kitchen & rest room and the private offices of the Regional Secretary (office manager) and their deputy.

First Dloor - Tribunal hearing rooms; separate public waiting rooms for Applicants & Respondents; two small rooms used by Counsel (on a ’whoever arrives first’ bases) and a small private rest room for use by tribunal lay members.

Second Floor - Tribunal Hearing Rooms; Tribunal Head Office - HR & Estate Depts & other tennants.

Third Floor - other tennants

Fourth Floor - other tennants

Fifth Floor - Other Tennants except for a large non-smoking room for staff, (which overlooked Tavistock Sqaure). It was seldom used, as a result of lacking any facities aside from a meagre collection of unwanted’ tatty seating. Next to it, (overlooking Tavistock Place) was a staff canteen.

Sixth Floor - Other tennants mostly except for a few offices on the northern side occupied by tribunal Head Office - IT Dept.

Seventh Floor - Other tenants in the northern side. The southern (front) side held the private offices of several senior managers (Secretariat, IT & Finance), private office of the Chief Accuntant; an office for two private secretaries and a stationary cupboard. On the rear side was a small kitchen; the private office of the Chief Executive and the private office of the President of the Tribunals for England & Wales. (From 1995 onwards, this became a conference room as the President was based elsewhere. The far end of this side contained an open plan office for Head Office staff - Secretariat, Finance & HR (staff training team) depts.

Eighth Floor - other tennants.


The Employment Tribunals (Regional & Head Offices) relocated to Vitory House, Kingsway in April 2005.






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V:2

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
29 Aldgate High Street 29 Aldgate High Street is a demolished property, originally on the north side of Aldgate High Street..
46 Aldgate High Street This Grade II Listed office building is one of the few timber-framed buildings in the City that predates the Great Fire of 1666.
Aldgate Aldgate was one of the massive gates which defended the City from Roman times until 1760.
Aldgate bus station Aldgate Bus Station serves the Aldgate area of the City of London.
Aldgate East In a land east of Aldgate, lies the land of Aldgate East...
Altab Ali Park Altab Ali Park is a small park on Adler Street, White Church Lane and Whitechapel Road.
Boar’s Head Theatre The Boar’s Head Theatre was an inn-yard theatre in the Whitechapel area.
Goodman’s Fields Goodman’s Fields was a farm beyond the walls of the City.
Goodman’s Fields Theatre Two 18th century theatres bearing the name Goodman’s Fields Theatre were located on Alie Street, Whitechapel.
Holy Trinity, Minories Holy Trinity, Minories was a Church of England parish church outside the eastern boundaries of the City of London, but within the Liberties of the Tower of London.
Minories Minories was the western terminus of the London and Blackwall Railway.
Portsoken Portsoken is one of 25 wards in the City of London, each electing an alderman to the Court of Aldermen and commoners (the City equivalent of a councillor) elected to the Court of Common Council of the City of London Corporation.
St Botolph’s St. Botolph’s without Aldgate, located on Aldgate High Street, has existed for over a thousand years.
St George’s German Lutheran Church St George’s German Lutheran Church is a church in Alie Street, Whitechapel.
St Mary Matfelon St Mary Matfelon church was popularly known as St Mary’s, Whitechapel.
St Mary’s (Whitechapel Road) St Mary’s was a station on the Metropolitan Railway and the District Railway lines, located between Whitechapel and Aldgate East stations.
The 1912 streets of Spitalfields The fascinating story of one man’s random walk in 1912
Toynbee Hall Toynbee Hall is a building which is the home of a charity of the same name.
Wentworth Street Turn-of-the-century fashion in east London.
Whitechapel Gallery The Whitechapel Gallery is a public art gallery in Aldgate.

NEARBY STREETS
Adler Street, E1 Adler Street runs between the Whitechapel Road and the Commercial Road.
Albany Court, E1 Albany Court is a block on Plumbers Row.
Aldgate High Street, EC3N Once the route to one of the six original gates of the Wall of London, Aldgate High Street has an important place in medieval London’s history.
Aldgate House, EC3N Aldgate House is a building adjacent to Aldgate station.
Aldgate Tower, E1 Aldgate Tower is a block on Leman Street.
Alie Street, E1 Originally called Ayliff Street, Alie Street was named after a relative of William Leman, whose great-uncle, John Leman had bought Goodman’s Fields.
Amazon Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
America House, EC3 America House is a block on Crosswall.
America House, EC3N America House is sited on America Square.
America Square, EC3N America Square is a street and small square, built in about 1760 and dedicated to the American colonies.
Angel Alley, E1 Angel Alley was a narrow passage which ran north-south from Wentworth Street to Whitechapel High Street..
Arcadia Court, E1 Arcadia Court is a block on Old Castle Street.
Assam Street, E1 Assam Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Back Church Lane, E1 Back Church Lane is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Bailey Tower, E1 Bailey Tower is a block on Challoner Walk.
Barnett House, E1 Barnett House is sited on Bell Lane.
Bartlett House, E1 Bartlett House is sited on Wentworth Street.
Basil House, E1 Basil House is a block on Henriques Street.
Batson House, E1 Batson House is a building on Fairclough Street.
Batty Street, E1 Batty Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Beadnell Court, E1 Beadnell Court is a block on Cable Street.
Bell Lane, E1 Bell Lane has late C16/early C17 origins, dividing the Halifax estate from the nearby tenter ground.
Bernhard Baron House, E1 Bernhard Baron House is a building on Henriques Street.
Bicknell House, E1 Bicknell House is a block on Ellen Street.
Black Lion Yard, E1 Black Lion Yard was a narrow thoroughfare running north-south from Old Montague Street (where it was accessible via a set of steps) to Whitechapel Road.
BLSA Building, E1 BLSA Building is a block on Newark Street.
Booth House, E1 Booth House is a block on Whitechapel Road.
Bowmans Mews, E1 Bowmans Mews is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Boyard Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Boyd Street, E1 Boyd Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Bradbury Court, E1 Bradbury Court is a block on Old Castle Street.
Braham Street, E1 Braham Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Bridle Mews, E1 Bridle Mews is a location in London.
Brody House, E1 Brody House is a block on Strype Street.
Brook House, E1 Brook House is a block on Fletcher Street.
Brune House, E1 Brune House is located on Bell Lane.
Brune Street, E1 Brune Street was laid out between 1810 and 1824 but redeveloped in the early 20th century.
Buckle Street, E1 Buckle Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Burlington Court, E1 Burlington Court is sited on Cable Street.
Burslem Street, E1 Burslem Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Cable Street, E1 Cable Street started as a straight path along which hemp ropes were twisted into ships’ cables.
Calcutta House, E1 Calcutta House is a block on Old Castle Street.
Camperdown Street, E1 Camperdown Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Cannon Street Road, E1 Cannon Street Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Canter Way, E1 Canter Way is a location in London.
Carter House, E1 Carter House is a block on Unnamed Road.
Cashmere House, E1 Cashmere House is a block on Leman Street.
Cassia House, E1 Cassia House is a block on Piazza Walk.
Casson Street, E1 Casson Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Catalina House, E1 Catalina House is sited on Canter Way.
Caxton Apartments, E1 Caxton Apartments is a block on Cable Street.
Central House, E1 Central House is a block on Whitechapel High Street.
Central Tower, E1 Central Tower is a block on Commercial Road.
Ceylon House, E1 Ceylon House is sited on Alie Street.
Challoner Walk, E1 Challoner Walk is a location in London.
Chamber Street, E1 Chamber Street is a thoroughfare running east-west from Leman Street to Mansell Street.
Chandlery House, E1 Chandlery House is a block on Gower’s Walk.
Chicksand Street, E1 Chicksand Street runs east from Brick Lane.
Christian Street, E1 Christian Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Christopher Court, E1 Christopher Court is a block on Leman Street.
Circle Place, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Cobb Street, E1 Cobb Street was laid out in 1899-1904 by Sir Algernon Osborn.
Colefax Building, E1 Colefax Building is a block on Plumbers Row.
College East, E1 College East is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Comfort House, E1 Comfort House is a block on Turner Street.
Commercial House, E1 Commercial House is a block on Commercial Street.
Coney Way, E1 Coney Way is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Coppergate House, E1 Residential block
Cornell Building, E1 Cornell Building is a block on Coke Street.
Crescent, EC3N Crescent lies behind Tower Gateway.
Crinoline Mews, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Crosswall, EC3N Crosswall was formerly named John Street, after King John.
Danvers House, E1 Danvers House is a block on Greatorex street.
Davenant Street, E1 Davenant Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Define House, E1 Define House is a block on Hessel Street.
Delafield House, E1 Delafield House is a building on Umberston Street.
DeMazenod House, E1 DeMazenod House is a block on Chamber Street.
Denning Point 33 Commercial Street, E1 A block within the E1 postcode
District Court, E1 District Court is sited on Commercial Road.
Dowson Place, E1 Dowson Place appears on the 1862 Stanford map.
Drewett House, E1 Drewett House can be found on Christian Street.
Dryden Building, E1 Dryden Building is a block on Commercial Road.
Duru House, E1 Duru House is a block on Commercial Road.
East Tenter Street, E1 East Tenter Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Education Square, E1 Education Square is a location in London.
Ellen Place, E1 Ellen Place existed until the twentieth century.
Ellen Street, E1 Ellen Street is an older street of the area, already existing and with this name by the 1820s.
Ely Place, E1 Ely Place appears on the 1862 Stanford map.
Empire House, E1 Empire House is a block on New Road.
Enterprise House, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Esprit Court, E1 Esprit Court is a block on Brune Street.
Evelyn House, E1 Evelyn House is a block on Greatorex Street.
Everard House, E1 Everard House is a block on Ellen Street.
Fabian House, E1 Fabian House is a block on Cannon Street Road.
Fairclough Street, E1 Fairclough Street runs from Back Church Lane to Christian Street.
Fashion Street, E1 Fashion Street is a thoroughfare running east-west from Brick Lane to Commercial Street.
Fieldgate Street, E1 Fieldgate Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Fletcher Street, E1 Fletcher Street runs south off of Cable Street.
Flintlock Close, E1 Flintlock Close is a location in London.
Florin Court, E1 Florin Court is a block on Dock Street.
Flower and Dean Street, E1 Flower and Dean Street was a narrow street running east-west from Commercial Street to Brick Lane.
Flower and Dean Walk, E1 Flower and Dean Walk is a street of social housing created in the 1980s.
Forbes Street, E1 Forbes Street replaced Splidts Street after the Second World War.
Fordham Street, E1 Fordham Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Foundry Court, E1 Foundry Court is a block on Plumbers Row.
Frazer House, E1 Frazer House can be found on Leman Street.
Frostic Walk, E1 Frostic Walk leads from Chicksand Street to Old Montague Street.
Garamond Building, E1 Garamond Building is a block on Crowder Street.
Garrod Building, E1 Garrod Building is a block on Turner Street.
George Leybourne House, E1 George Leybourne House is a block on Wellclose Square.
George Street, E1 George Street was a street running north-south from Flower and Dean Street to Wentworth Street, crossing Thrawl Street approx. half way along its length..
Golding Street, E1 Golding Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Goodman Stile, E1 Goodman Stile is a location in London.
Goodman Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Goodman’s Yard, E1 Goodman’s Yard is a street between Minories and Mansell Street.
Goodmans Yard, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Goulston Street, E1 Goulston Street is a thoroughfare running north-south from Wentworth Street to Whitechapel High Street.
Gower’s Walk, E1 Gower’s Walk leads south from Commercial Road.
Graces Alley, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Gravel Lane, E1 Gravel Lane is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Green Dragon Yard, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Greenfield Road, E1 Greenfield Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Guinea Court, E1 Guinea Court is a building on Dock Street.
Guinness Court, E1 Guinness Court is a block on Guinness Court.
Gunthorpe Street, E1 Gunthorpe Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Gwynne House, E1 Gwynne House is located on Turner Street.
Hadfield House, E1 Hadfield House is a block on Ellen Street.
Halliday House, E1 Halliday House is a block on Stutfield Street.
Hanson House, E1 Hanson House is sited on Philchurch Street.
Harkness House, E1 Harkness House is a building on Christian Street.
Harrison House, E1 Harrison House is a block on Challoner Walk.
Haydon Street, E1 The eastern end of Haydon Street was called Mansell Passage.
Haydon Street, EC3N Haydon Street heads east from the Minories.
Henriques Street, E1 Henriques Street was formerly called Berner Street.
Herbert House, E1 Herbert House is sited on Old Castle Street.
Hessel Street, E1 Hessel Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Hindmarsh Close, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Hodgeson House, E1 Hodgeson House is sited on Christian Street.
Hogarth Court, E1 Hogarth Court is a block on Batty Street.
Hooper Street, E1 Hooper Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Hopetown Street, E1 This is a street in the E1 postcode area
Ibex House, EC3N Residential block
India Street, EC3N India Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3N postal area.
Jacobs Court, E1 Jacobs Court is a block on Plumbers Row.
Jacobson House, E1 Jacobson House is a block on Old Castle Street.
John Sessions Square, E1 John Sessions Square lies off of Alie Street.
John Sinclair Court, E1 John Sinclair Court is a block on Thrawl Street.
Kensington Apartments, E1 Kensington Apartments is a block on Pomell Way.
Kent and Essex Yard, E1 Kent and Essex Yard ran north of Whitechapel High Street, close to the west side of Commercial Street.
Kinder Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Kindersley House, E1 Kindersley House is a block on Philchurch Street.
Kings Arms Court, E1 Kings Arms Court lies off Old Montague Street.
Kiran Apartments, E1 Kiran Apartments is located on Chicksand Street.
Knock Fergus, E1 Knock Fergus was absorbed into Cable Street during the 1860s.
Ladbroke House, E1 Ladbroke House is a block on Commercial Street.
Langdale Street, E1 Langdale Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Langmore House, E1 Langmore House is a block on Stutfield Street.
Leman Street, E1 Leman Street was named after Sir John Leman.
Leyden Street, E1 Leyden Street was laid out in 1899-1904 by Sir Algernon Osborn.
Little Somerset Street, E1 Little Somerset Street was originally called Harrow Alley but colloquially known as ’Blood Alley.’
Lolesworth Close, E1 Lolesworth Close is a short cul-de-sac on the east side of Commercial Street which was originally the western extremity of Flower and Dean Street.
Luntley Place, E1 Luntley Place appears on the 1862 Stanford map.
Manningtree Street, E1 Manningtree Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Manous House, E1 Manous House is a block on Hessel Street.
Mansell Street, E1 Mansell Street runs north-south on the City of London border.
Marden House, E1 Marden House is located on Batty Street.
Martineau Square, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Maryann Street, E1 Maryann Street existed from the 1810s until after the Second World War.
Mcauley House, E1 Mcauley House is a building on Wentworth Street.
Meadowcroft Mews, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Meranti House, E1 Meranti House can be found on Goodman’s Stile.
Michael’s House, E1 Michael’s House is a block on Alie Street.
Middlesex Street, EC3A Middlesex Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
Mill Yard, E1 Mill Yard is a road in the E1 postcode area
Minories, EC3N Minories is one of the old streets of the City of London.
Mitali Passage, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Monthope Road, E1 This is a street in the E1 postcode area
Mount Terrace, E1 Mount Terrace is a road in the E1 postcode area
Mulberry Street, E1 Mulberry Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Myrdle Court, E1 Myrdle Court is a block on Myrdle Street.
Myrdle Street, E1 Myrdle Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Nathaniel Close, E1 Nathaniel Close consists of houses and flats built in the early 1980s.
Neroli House, E1 Neroli House is a building on Piazza Walk.
New Drum Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
New Evershed House, E1 New Evershed House is located on Old Castle Street.
New Goulston Street, E1 New Goulston Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
New Loom House, E1 New Loom House is a block on Back Church Lane.
New Road, E1 New Road is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Noble Court, E1 Noble Court is a block on Cable Street.
North Tenter Street, E1 North Tenter Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Norton House, E1 Norton House is a block on Cannon Street Road.
Norvin House, E1 Norvin House can be found on Commercial Street.
Novem House, E1 Novem House is a block on Chicksand Street.
Odeon Court, E1 Odeon Court is a block on Chicksand Street.
Old Castle Street, E1 Old Castle Street runs north-south from Wentworth Street to Whitechapel High Street, the southern section of which incorporates the former Castle Alley, murder site of Ripper victim Alice McKenzie.
Old Montague Street, E1 Old Montague Street is a thoroughfare running east-west from Baker’s Row (now Vallance Road) to Brick Lane.
Old Pump House, E1 Old Pump House is a block on Hooper Street.
Osborn Place, E1 Osborn Place appears on maps between 1800 and 1900.
Osborn Street, E1 Osborn Street is a short road leading from Whitechapel Road to the crossroads with Brick Lane, Wentworth Street and Old Montague Street.
Osborne House, E1 Osborne House is a block on Osborn Street.
Parfett Street, E1 Parfett Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Patriot House, E1 Patriot House is a block on Hessel Street.
Pegswood Court, E1 Pegswood Court is a block on Cable Street.
Penine House, E1 Penine House is a block on Camperdown Street.
Perilla House, E1 Perilla House is a building on Bridle Mews.
Peter Best House, E1 Peter Best House can be found on Nelson Street.
Philchurch Place, E1 Philchurch Place is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Philchurch Street, E1 Philchurch Street, which disappeared after the Second World War, was originally Philip Street.
Piazza Walk, E1 Piazza Walk is a location in London.
Pimento House, E1 Pimento House is located on Gower’s Walk.
Pinchin Street, E1 Pinchin Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Plumbers Row, E1 Plumbers Row is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Pomell Way, E1 Pomell Way is a road in the E1 postcode area
Ponler Street, E1 Ponler Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Portsoken Street, EC3N Portsoken Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Prescot House, E1 Prescot House is a block on Prescot Street.
Prescot Street, E1 Prescot Street was named for Rebecca Prescott, wife of William Leman.
Prince of Orange Court, E1 Prince of Orange Court was a former street in the area.
Proud House, E1 Proud House is a block on Amazon Street.
Queen’s Place, E1 Queen’s Place seems to have been a victim of the London Blitz.
Rampart Street, E1 Rampart Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Resolution Plaza, E1 Resolution Plaza is a location in London.
Richard Street, E1 Richard Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Riga Mews, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Rix Court, E1 Rix Court was replaced by a wool warehouse sometime during the twentieth century.
Romford Street, E1 Romford Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Rope Walk Gardens, E1 Rope Walk Gardens is a location in London.
Ropewalk Gardens, EC1M Ropewalk Gardens is a location in London.
Ruby House, E1 Ruby House is located on Myrdle Street.
Rupert Street, E1 Rupert Street was situated to the east of Leman Street.
Sander Street, E1 Sander Street ran from Back Church Lane to Berner Street (Henriques Street).
Sapphire Court, E1 Sapphire Court is a block on Ensign Street.
Satin House, E1 Satin House is a block on Canter Way.
Scarborough Street, E1 This is a street in the E1 postcode area
Settles Street, E1 Settles Street links Fieldgate Street with Commercial Road.
Severne Street, E1 Severne Street - also Severn Street - was a victim of the London Blitz.
Shearsmith House, E1 Shearsmith House is a building on Hindmarsh Close.
Sloane Apartments, E1 Sloane Apartments is sited on Old Castle Street.
Sly Street, E1 Sly Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Smithfield Court, E1 Smithfield Court is located on Cable Street.
Somerset House, E1 Somerset House is a block on New Road.
South Tenter Street, E1 South Tenter Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Spelman House, E1 Spelman House is a block on Spelman Street.
Splidts Street, E1 Splidts Street was formerly Splidts Terrace and before that, Cain’s Place.
St Botolph Street, EC3A St Botolph Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3A postal area.
St Clare House, EC3N St Clare House is sited on Minories.
St Clare Street, EC3N St Clare Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3N postal area.
St Clements House, E1 St Clements House is a building on Leyden Street.
St Mark Street, E1 St Mark Street was built on the old Goodman’s Fields.
Stable Walk, E1 Stable Walk is a location in London.
Standon House, E1 Standon House is a block on Mansell Street.
Strype Street, E1 John Strype, who became an antiquary, historian and parson was the son of a Huguenot weaver and born near here in 1643.
Stutfield Street, E1 Stutfield Street has existed since the early nineteenth century.
Sugar House, E1 Sugar House is a block on Leman Street.
Suntash Apartments, E1 Suntash Apartments can be found on Umberston Street.
Swedenborg Gardens, E1 Swedenborg Gardens is a road in the E1 postcode area
Symons House, E1 Symons House is a building on Alie Street.
Tait Street, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Tate Apartments, E1 Tate Apartments is a block on Sly Street.
Tenter Ground, E1 Tenter Ground is one of the notable streetnames of Spitalfields.
The Community Centre, E1 The Community Centre is a location in London.
The Old Montague Apartments, E1 The Old Montague Apartments is a block on Old Montague Street.
The Relay Building, E1 The Relay Building is a block on Commercial Street.
The White Chapel Building, E1 The White Chapel Building is a block on Whitechapel High Street.
Thrawl Street, E1 Originally built by Henry Thrall around 1656, Thrawl Street ran east-west from Brick Lane across a former tenter field owned by the Fossan brothers, Thomas and Lewis.
Tower House, E1 Tower House is a block on Fieldgate Street.
Toynbee Street, E1 Toynbee Street, formerly Shepherd Street, was laid out in 1810-24 and redeveloped in 1927-36 as part of the London County Council’s Holland estate.
Turner Street, E1 Turner Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Tyne Street, E1 Tyne Street is a location in London.
Umberston Street, E1 Umberston Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
Universal House, E1 Universal House is a block on Wentworth Street.
Vibeca Apartments, E1 Vibeca Apartments is a block on Chicksand Street.
Vine Court, E1 Vine Court is a small turning south from Whitechapel Road.
Vine Street, EC3N Vine Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3N postal area.
Walden Street, E1 Walden Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Walford House, E1 Walford House is a block on Estate Road.
Welstead House, E1 Welstead House is a block on Cannon Street Road.
Wentworth Street, E1 Wentworth Street runs east-west from the junction of Brick Lane, Osborn Street and Old Montague Street to Middlesex Street.
West Tenter Street, E1 West Tenter Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
White Church Lane, E1 White Church Lane is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area.
White Church Passage, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Whitechapel High Street, E1 Whitechapel High Street runs approximately west-east from Aldgate High Street to Whitechapel Road and is designated as part of the A11.
Whitechapel Market, E1 Whitechapel Market is a road in the E1 postcode area
Whitechapel Road, E1 Whitechapel Road is a major arterial road in East London.
Whitechapel Technology Centre, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Whites Row, E1 White’s Row is a narrow thoroughfare running east-west from Commercial Street to Crispin Street.
Wicker Street, E1 Wicker Street is a road in the E1 postcode area
Wilson Tower, E1 Wilson Tower is a block on Christian Street.
Wiverton Tower, E1 Wiverton Tower is a block on New Drum Street.
Wool House, E1 Wool House is a building on Back Church Lane.
Workhouse Apartments, E1 Workhouse Apartments is a block on Feather Mews.
Wynfrid House, E1 Wynfrid House is a block on Mulberry Street.

NEARBY PUBS
Still and Star The Still & Star was on Little Somerset Street near to Aldgate High Street.
The Bell The Bell is on the non-City of London side of Middlesex Street.
The Culpeper The Culpeper used to be called the Princess Alice.


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Aldgate East

In a land east of Aldgate, lies the land of Aldgate East...

The name Commercial Road had been proposed for the original Aldgate East station, which opened on 6 October 1884 as part of an eastern extension to the Metropolitan District Railway (now the District Line), some 500 feet to the west of the current station, close to the Metropolitan Railway’s Aldgate station. However, when the curve to join the Metropolitan Railway from Liverpool Street was built, the curve had to be particularly sharp due to the presence of Aldgate East station, at which it needed to be straight.

As part of London Transport’s 1935-1940 New Works Programme, the triangular junction at Aldgate was enlarged, to allow for a much gentler curve and to ensure that trains held on any leg of the triangle did not foul the signals and points at other places. The new Aldgate East platforms were sited almost immediately to the east of their predecessors, with one exit facing west toward the original location, and another at the east end of the new platforms.

The new eastern exit was now close enough to the next station along the line, St Mary’s (Whitechapel Road), that this station could also be closed, reducing operational overhead and journey times, as the new Aldgate East had effectively replaced two earlier stations.

The new station, opened on 31 October 1938 (the earlier station closing permanently the previous night), was designed to be completely subterranean, providing a much needed pedestrian underpass to the road above. However, in order to accommodate the space needed for this, and the platforms below, the existing track required lowering by more than seven feet. To achieve this task, whilst still keeping the track open during the day, the bed underneath the track was excavated, and the track held up by a timber trestle work. Then, once excavation was complete and the new station constructed around the site, an army of over 900 workmen lowered the whole track simultaneously in one night, utilising overhead hooks to suspend the track when necessary. The hooks still remain.

District and Hammersmith and City line trains running into Aldgate East along two sides of the triangle (from Liverpool Street and from Tower Hill) pass through the site of the earlier station, most of which has been obliterated by the current junction alignment, although the extensive width and height and irregular shape of the tunnel can be observed.

Since the station was built completely under a widened road, and was built after concrete had started to be used as a construction material, the platforms have a particularly high headroom. Combined with the late 1930s style of tiling typical of the stations of the then London Passenger Transport Board, the platform area of the station presents a particularly airy and welcoming appearance, unusual on the underground at the time of construction. The tiling contains relief tiles, showing devices pertinent to London Transport and the area it served, were designed by Harold Stabler and made by the Poole Pottery.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Byward Tower, 1893
TUM image id: 1556882285
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The Boar’s Head was located on the north side of Whitechapel High Street. The Boar’s Head was originally an inn, which was built in the 1530s; it underwent two renovations for use as a playhouse: first, in 1598, when a simple stage was erected, and a second, more elaborate renovation in 1599.
Credit: Unknown
Licence:


The Third Goodmans Fields Theatre, Great Alie Street (1801)
Credit: W. W. Hutchings
Licence:


Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov (Lenin) addressing a "smoking debate" at Toynbee Hall (1902)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


A drawing published in 1907 of the west front of the Church of Holy Trinity, Minories
Credit: Uncredited
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Whitechapel Gallery
Credit: LeHaye/Wiki Commons
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Battle of Cable Street mural The Battle of Cable Street took place on the corner of Cable Street and Dock Street, and other places
Credit: Wiki CommonsAlan Denney
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Middlesex Street (Petticoat Lane) on the site of Sandy’s Row (1912)
Credit: CA Mathew/Bishopsgate Institute
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Ten Bells pub, Spitalfields (2012) The Jamie Oliver series Jamie’s Great Britain featured his great-great-grandfather was a landlord of the pub during the 1880s. Oliver was shown visiting the Ten Bells to discuss his East London roots, and to see how Londoners lived, drank and ate at the end of the 19th century.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Wordspotandsmith
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Old Spitalfields Market (2017) This is a covered market which has been on the site for over 350 years. In 2005, a regeneration programme resulted in the new public spaces: Bishops Square and Crispin Place, which are now part of the modern Spitalfields Market. A range of public markets runs daily, with independent local stores and restaurants - as well as new office developments.
Credit: Pete Gloria
Licence: CC BY 2.0


A view east along Whitechapel Road including the Pavilion Theatre. The Pavilion was the first major theatre to open in the East End. It opened in 1827 and closed in 1935.
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