Shalcomb Street, SW10

Road in/near Chelsea

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(51.48273 -0.1799, 51.482 -0.179) 
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Road · Chelsea · SW10 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Shalcomb Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963-65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

Reply
Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
John Neill   
Added: 25 Nov 2021 11:30 GMT   

Sandringham Road, E10 (1937 - 1966)
I lived at No. 61 with my parents during these years. I went to Canterbury Road school (now Barclay Primary) and sang as a boy soprano (treble) in the church choir at St Andrew’s church, on the corner of Forest Glade.
Opposite us lived the Burgess family. Their son Russell also sang in my choir as a tenor. He later became a well-known musician and the choirmaster at Wandsworth Boys’ School.
Just at the end of WW2 a German rocket (V2) landed in the grounds of Whipps Cross Hospital, damaging many of the houses in Sandringham Road, including ours.

Reply
Comment
Tim Stevenson   
Added: 16 Nov 2021 18:03 GMT   

Pub still open
The Bohemia survived the 2020/21 lockdowns and is still a thriving local social resource.

Reply
Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

Reply

STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

Reply

Sir Walter Besant   
Added: 11 Nov 2021 18:47 GMT   

Sir Walter adds....
All the ground facing Wirtemberg Street at Chip and Cross Streets is being levelled for building and the old houses are disappearing fast. The small streets leading through into little Manor Street are very clean and tenanted by poor though respectable people, but little Manor Street is dirty, small, and narrow. Manor Street to Larkhall Rise is a wide fairly clean thoroughfare of mixed shops and houses which improves towards the north. The same may be said of Wirtemberg Street, which commences poorly, but from the Board School north is far better than at the Clapham end.

Source: London: South of the Thames - Chapter XX by Sir Walter Besant (1912)

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

Reply
Comment
tom   
Added: 3 Nov 2021 05:16 GMT   

I met
someone here 6 years ago

Reply
Comment
Fion Anderson   
Added: 2 Nov 2021 12:55 GMT   

Elstree not Borehamwood
Home of the UK film industry

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Cremorne Gardens Cremorne Gardens, with a vestige existing today, was in its prime between 1846 and 1877.

NEARBY STREETS
Ann Lane, SW10 Ann Lane is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Ashburnham Road, SW10 Ashburnham Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Battersea Bridge, SW3 Battersea Bridge, a five-span arch bridge with cast-iron girders and granite piers links Battersea south of the River Thames with Chelsea to the north.
Beaufort Street, SW3 Beaufort Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Billing Road, SW10 Billing Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Blantyre Street, SW10 Blantyre Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Bridges Place, SW6 Bridges Place is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
Burnaby Street, SW10 Burnaby Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Callow Street, SW3 Callow Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Camera Place, SW10 Camera Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Carlyle Square, SW3 Carlyle Square was named in honour of the writer Thomas Carlyle in 1872.
Carmichael Close, SW10 A street within the SW10 postcode
Cathcart Road, SW10 Cathcart Road is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Chapel Walk, SW3 Chapel Walk is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Chelsea Crescent, SW10 Chelsea Crescent is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Chelsea Park Gardens, SW3 Chelsea Park Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Chelsea Wharf, SW10 Chelsea Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Cheyne Walk, SW10 Cheyne Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Cremorne Road, SW10 Cremorne Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Damer Terrace, SW10 Damer Terrace is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Danvers Street, SW3 Sir John Danvers (died 1655) introduced Italian gardens to England in his mansion Danvers House whose grounds spread from the river to the Kings Road.
Dartrey Tower, SW10 Dartrey Tower is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
East Road, SW10 East Road is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Edith Grove, SW10 Edith Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Edith Terrace, SW10 Edith Terrace is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Edith Yard Edith Grove, SW10 Edith Yard Edith Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Elm Park Gardens, SW10 Elm Park Gardens is a location in London.
Elm Park Mansions, SW10 Elm Park Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Elm Park Road, SW3 Elm Park Road is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Esher House, SW10 Residential block
Farrier Walk, SW10 Farrier Walk is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Fawcett Street, SW10 Fawcett Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Fernshaw Close, SW10 Fernshaw Close is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Fernshaw Road, SW10 Fernshaw Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Fulham Road, SW10 Fulham Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Gertrude Street, SW10 Gertrude Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Greaves Tower, SW10 Greaves Tower is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Gunter Grove, SW10 Gunter Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Hobury Street, SW10 Hobury Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Hollywood Mews, SW10 Hollywood Mews is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Hollywood Road, SW10 Hollywood Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Hortensia Road, SW10 Hortensia Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
King’s Road, SW10 This is a street in the SW10 postcode area
Kings Road, SW10 Kings Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Lamont Road, SW10 Lamont Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Langton Street, SW10 Langton Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Limerston Street, SW10 Limerston Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
London House, SW10 Residential block
Mallord Street, SW3 Mallord Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Maynard Close, SW6 Maynard Close is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
Milmans Street, SW10 Milmans Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Moravian Place, SW10 Moravian Place is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Mulberry Walk, SW3 Mulberry Walk is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Munro Terrace, SW10 Munro Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Netherton Grove, SW10 Netherton Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Nightingale Place, SW10 Nightingale Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Old Church Street, SW3 Old Church Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Park Walk, SW10 Park Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Park Walk, SW3 Park Walk is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Paultons Square, SW3 Paultons Square, a garden square, was built in 1836–40 on the site of a former market garden.
Paultons Street, SW3 Paultons Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Paveley Drive, SW11 Paveley Drive is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Raasay Street, SW10 Raasay Street ran from Dartrey Road to Edith Grove.
Ramsay Mews, SW3 Ramsay Mews is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Redcliffe Gardens, SW10 Redcliffe Gardens began life as Walnut Tree Walk, a pathway running through nurseries and market gardens.
Redcliffe Place, SW10 Redcliffe Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Redcliffe Road, SW10 Redcliffe Road is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Riley Street, SW10 Riley Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Seymour Walk, SW10 Seymour Walk was almost entirely built between the 1790s-1820s in an area then known as Little Chelsea.
Slaidburn Street, SW10 Slaidburn Street is a street in London
South Walk, SW10 South Walk is a road in the SW10 postcode area
St Andrews Church, SW10 St Andrews Church is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
St Lukes Church Hall, SW10 St Lukes Church Hall is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Stadium Street, SW10 Stadium Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Tadema Road, SW10 Tadema Road was named after Lawrence Alma-Tadema
Tetcott Road, SW10 Tetcott Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
The Courtyard, SW3 The Courtyard is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
The Plaza, SW10 The Plaza is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
The Vale, SW3 The Vale is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Thorndike Close, SW10 Thorndike Close is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Trident Place, SW3 Trident Place is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Upcerne Road, SW10 Upcerne Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Upper Whistler Walk, SW10 This is a street in the SW10 postcode area
Uverdale Road, SW10 Uverdale Road runs north from Lots Road.
Wardens Square, SW6 Wardens Square is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
West Road, SW10 West Road is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Whistler Walk, SW10 Whistler Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
World’s End Passage, SW10 World’s End Passage is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Worlds End Place, SW10 Worlds End Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Azteca This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Beaufort House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Chelsea Pensioner This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Chelsea Ram This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Goat This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Mare Moto This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Raffles Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Riley’s This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sporting Page This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Cadogan Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Jam Tree This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Kings Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Pig’s Ear This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Zefi Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Chelsea

Chelsea is an affluent area, bounded to the south by the River Thames.

Its eastern boundary was once defined by the River Westbourne, which is now in a pipe above Sloane Square tube station. The modern eastern boundary is Chelsea Bridge Road and the lower half of Sloane Street, including Sloane Square, along with parts of Belgravia. To the north and northwest, the area fades into Knightsbridge and South Kensington, but it is safe to say that the area north of King’s Road as far northwest as Fulham Road is part of Chelsea.

The word Chelsea originates from the Old English term for chalk and landing place on the river. The first record of the Manor of Chelsea precedes the Domesday Book and records the fact that Thurstan, governor of the King’s Palace during the reign of Edward the Confessor (10421066), gave the land to the Abbot and Convent of Westminster. Abbot Gervace subsequently assigned the manor to his mother, and it passed into private ownership. The modern-day Chelsea hosted the Synod of Chelsea in 787 AD.

Chelsea once had a reputation for the manufacture of Chelsea buns (made from a long strip of sweet dough tightly coiled, with currants trapped between the layers, and topped with sugar).

King Henry VIII acquired the manor of Chelsea from Lord Sandys in 1536; Chelsea Manor Street is still extant. Two of King Henry’s wives, Catherine Parr and Anne of Cleves, lived in the Manor House; Princess Elizabeth the future Queen Elizabeth I resided there; and Thomas More lived more or less next door at Beaufort House. In 1609 James I established a theological college on the site of the future Chelsea Royal Hospital, which Charles II founded in 1682.

By 1694, Chelsea always a popular location for the wealthy, and once described as ’a village of palaces’ had a population of 3000. Even so, Chelsea remained rural and served London to the east as a market garden, a trade that continued until the 19th-century development boom which caused the final absorption of the district into the metropolis.

Chelsea shone, brightly but briefly, in the 1960s Swinging London period and the early 1970s. The Swinging Sixties was defined on King’s Road, which runs the length of the area. The Western end of Chelsea featured boutiques Granny Takes a Trip and The Sweet Shop, the latter of which sold medieval silk velvet caftans, tabards and floor cushions, with many of the cultural cognoscenti of the time being customers, including Keith Richards, Twiggy and many others.

The exclusivity of Chelsea as a result of its high property prices has historically resulted in the term Sloane Ranger to be used to describe its residents. From 2011, Channel 4 broadcast a reality television show called Made in Chelsea, documenting the ’glitzy’ lives of several young people living in Chelsea. Moreover, Chelsea is home to one of the largest communities of Americans living outside of the United States, with 6.53% of Chelsea-residents being born in the United States.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Elm Park Gardens
TUM image id: 1573064988
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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The Dancing Platform at Cremorne Gardens
Credit: Phoebus Levin (1864)
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Elm Park Gardens
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Boys and girls kick a ball around a quiet Uverdale Road, Chelsea (early 1960s). The road is now filled with parked cars and a gated playground. Just down the road from major bomb sites, this was one of a cluster of streets that became a ghost town in the wake of the Blitz
Credit: John Bignell
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Old Battersea Bridge, Walter Greaves (oil on canvas, 1874) Old Battersea Bridge, seen from upstream, on Lindsey Row (now Cheyne Walk), with Battersea on the far shore. The boatyard belonging to the Greaves family is in the foreground. On the extreme left is the wall surrounding the garden of the artist William Bell Scott. In the far distance Crystal Palace is just visible. Battersea Bridge was demolished in 1881, and replaced with the present bridge. Before the alterations Greaves recalled the danger to shipping and the difficulty of steering through the arches unless the set of the tide was known.
Credit: Tate Gallery
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Chelsea Farm in the days of Countess Huntindon
Credit: Kensington and Chelsea Libraries
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Lots Road Power Station (2005).
Credit: Adrian Pingstone
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Graffiti, Raasay Street, Chelsea (1969).
Credit: Roger Perry
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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