Southwalk Street, SE1

Road in/near Southwark

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(51.5051 -0.09718, 51.505 -0.097) 

Southwalk Street, SE1

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · Southwark · SE1 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Southwalk Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.




NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
The Ring The Ring was a boxing stadium which once stood on Blackfriars Road in Southwark.

NEARBY STREETS
America Street, SE1 America Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Anchor Terrace, SE1 The streetscape of Anchor Terrace largely involves small late 18th century residential properties
Angel Place, SE1 Angel Place was the site of the Marshalsea Prison between 1811 and 1842.
Applegarth House, SE1 Residential block
Ayres Street, SE1 Ayres Street was formerly known as Whitecross Street.
Bank End, SE1 Bank End is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Bankside way, SE1 Bankside way is a road in the SE19 postcode area
Bankside, SE1 Bankside is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Bear Gardens, SE1 Bear Gardens is the site of a medieval pleasure ground.
Bear Lane, SE1 Bear Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Bedale Street, SE1 Bedale Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Benbow House, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Betsham House, SE1 Residential block
Black Friars Road, SE1 Black Friars Road is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Blackfriars Bridge, SE1 Blackfriars Bridge is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Blackfriars Road, SE1 Blackfriars Road runs between St George’s Circus at the southern end and Blackfriars Bridge over the River Thames at the northern end, leading to the City of London.
Blackfriars Road, SE1 This is a street in the BL8 postcode area
Blue Fin Bldg, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Borough High Street, SE1 Borough High Street was the Roman ’Stane Street’.
Borough Market, SE1 Borough Market is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Brinton Walk, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Burrell Street, SE1 Burrell Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
C O Ltd, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Canvey Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Cardinal Cap Alley, SE1 Cardinal Cap Alley is an alley in Bankside.
Cathedral Street, SE1 Cathedral Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Chaloner Court, SE1 Chaloner Court is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Chancel Street, SE1 Chancel Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Chapel Court, SE1 Chapel Court has hosted The Blue-Eyed Maid pub since 1613.
Clennam Street, SE1 Clennam Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Clink Street, SE1 Clink Street is best known as the historic location of the Clink Prison.
Clink Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Columbo House 50-60, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Copperfield Street, SE1 Copperfield Street was named after the novel David Copperfield by Charles Dickens, by association with nearby Dickens Square.
Disney Place, SE1 Disney Place is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Dolben Street, SE1 Dolben Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Doyce Street, SE1 Doyce Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Emerson Street, SE1 Emerson Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Ewer Street, SE1 Ewer Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Falcon Point Piazza, SE1 Falcon Point Piazza is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Fifth Floor Valentine Place, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Gaitskell Way, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Gambia Street, SE1 Gambia Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Gare Apartments, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Gatehouse Square, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Gay Street, SE1 Gay Street is a road in the SW15 postcode area
Glasshill Street, SE1 Glasshill Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Godfree Court 29-35, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Grande Vitesse Industrial Centre, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Great Guildford Business Square, SE1 Great Guildford Business Square is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Great Guildford Street, SE1 Great Guildford Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Great Suffolk Street, SE1 Great Suffolk Street was at one time called Dirty Lane.
Hanseatic Walk, EC4R Hanseatic Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Hanseatic Walk, EC4R Hanseatic Walk is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Heath Lodge, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Holland Street, SE1 Today’s Holland Street was originally part of a street called Gravel Lane.
Hopton Street, SE1 Hopton Street was known as Green Walk until the late nineteenth century.
Horseshoe Wharf Apartments 6a, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Horseshoe Wharf Apartments, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Invicta Plaza, SE1 Invicta Plaza is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Isaac Way, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Junction Approach, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Kentish Buildings, SE1 Kentish Buildings is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Kings Bench Street, SE1 Kings Bench Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Kings Head Yard, SE1 Kings Head Yard is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Lagare Apartments, SE1 Lagare Apartments is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Langdale House, SE1 Residential block
Lant Street, SE1 Lant Street derives its name from the Lant family who inherited the estates known as Southwark Olace.
Lavington Street, SE1 Lavington Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Lockesley Square, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Loman Street, SE1 Loman Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Madison Apartments, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Madison, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Maiden Lane, SE1 Maiden Lane is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Maidstone Buildings Mews, SE1 Maidstone Buildings Mews is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Marlborough Gardens, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Marshalsea Road, SE1 Marshalsea Road was previously called Mint Street after a royal Tudor coin mint in the area.
Mermaid Court, SE1 Mermaid Court is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Merrow Street, SE1 Merrow Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Mint Street, SE1 Mint Street, an ancient Southwark street, (now) runs off Marchelsea Road.
Nelson Square, SE1 Nelson Square is a road in the SE1 postcode area
New Globe Walk, SE1 New Globe Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Newcomen Street, SE1 Newcomen Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Nicholson Street, SE1 Nicholson Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
O’Meara Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Omeara Street, SE1 Omeara Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Oystergate Walk, SE1 Oystergate Walk is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Park Street, SE1 Park Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Partners Ltd, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Peabody Estate, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Peckham High Street, SE1 Peckham High Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Pepper Street, SE1 Pepper Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Perkins Square, SE1 Perkins Square is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Plantain Place, SE1 Plantain Place is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Pocock Street, SE1 Pocock Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Porter Street, SE1 Porter Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Price’s Street, SE1 Price’s Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Queen’s Head Yard, SE1 Queen’s Head Yard is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Reach Walk, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Redcross Way, SE1 Redcross Way was previously called Red Cross Street.
Risborough Street, SE1 Risborough Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Robinson Road, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Rochester Walk, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Rose Alley, SE1 Rose Alley is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Rowland Hill House, SE1 Residential block
Rushworth Street, SE1 Rushworth Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Sanctuary Street, SE1 Sanctuary Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Sawyer Street, SE1 Sawyer Street is named after Bob Sawyer, a character in the novel The Pickwick Papers by local resident Charles Dickens.
Scoresby Street, SE1 Scoresby Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Soho Wharf, SE1 Soho Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Solomon Way, E1 Solomon Way is a location in London.
Southwark Bridge Road, SE1 Southwark Bridge Road is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Southwark Bridge, SE1 This is a street in the EC4R postcode area
Southwark Street, SE1 Southwark Street is a major street just south of the River Thames. It runs between Blackfriars Road to the west and Borough High Street to the east.
St Alphege House, SE1 Residential block
Stoney Street, SE1 Stoney Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Sudrey Street, SE1 Sudrey Street was formerly Little Suffolk Street.
Sumner Street, SE1 Sumner Street runs from Great Guildford Street to Southwark Bridge Road.
Surrey Row, SE1 Surrey Row is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Surrey Rowe, SE1 Surrey Rowe is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Talbot Yard, SE1 Talbot Yard used to host one of the most famous inns in English literature.
Tennis Street, SE1 Tennis Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
The Blue Fin Building, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
The Hop Exchange, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
The Mews, SE1 The Mews is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
The Terrace, SE1 The Terrace is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Thrale Street, SE1 Thrale Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Three Crown Square Borough Market, SE1 Three Crown Square Borough Market is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Trundle Street, SE1 Trundle Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Union Street, SE1 Union Street was so-called as it linked two other streets.
Victor Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Vine Yard, SE1 Vine Yard is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Weller Street, SE1 Weller Street is one of several local streets named after Dickens characters.
White Hart Yard, SE1 This is a street in the SE1 postcode area
Winchester Square, SE1 Winchester Square is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Winchester Walk, SE1 Winchester Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Winchester Walk, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Winchester Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Zoar Street, SE1 Zoar Street is named after the former Zoar Chapel here, named for the Biblical Zoara.


Southwark

Southwark is the area immediately south of London Bridge, opposite the City of London.

Southwark is on a previously marshy area south of the River Thames. Recent excavation has revealed prehistoric activity including evidence of early ploughing, burial mounds and ritual activity. The area was originally a series of islands in the River Thames. This formed the best place to bridge the Thames and the area became an important part of Londinium owing its importance to its position as the endpoint of the Roman London Bridge. Two Roman roads, Stane Street and Watling Street, met at Southwark in what is now Borough High Street.

At some point the Bridge fell or was pulled down. Southwark and the city seem to have become largely deserted during the Early Middle Ages. Archaeologically, evidence of settlement is replaced by a largely featureless soil called the Dark Earth which probably (although this is contested) represents an urban area abandoned.

Southwark appears to recover only during the time of King Alfred and his successors. Sometime in and around 886 AD the Bridge was rebuilt and the City and Southwark restored. Southwark was called ’Suddringa Geworc’ which means the ’defensive works of the men of Surrey’. It was probably fortified to defend the bridge and hence the re-emerging City of London to the north. This defensive role is highlighted by the use of the Bridge as a defense against King Swein, his son King Cnut and in 1066, against King William the Conqueror. He failed to force the Bridge during the Norman conquest of England, but Southwark was devastated.

Much of Southwark was originally owned by the church - the greatest reminder of monastic London is Southwark Cathedral, originally the priory of St Mary Overy.

During the Middle Ages, Southwark remained outside of the control of the City and was a haven for criminals and free traders, who would sell goods and conduct trades outside the regulation of the City Livery Companies. An important market - later to become known as the Borough Market - was established there some time in the 13th century. The area was renowned for its inns, especially The Tabard, from which Chaucer’s pilgrims set off on their journey in The Canterbury Tales.

After many decades’ petitioning, in 1550, Southwark was incorporated into the City of London as ’The Ward of Bridge Without’. It became the entertainment district for London, and it was also the red-light area. In 1599, William Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre was built on the South Bank in Southwark, though it burned down in 1613. A modern replica, also called the Globe, has been built near the original site. Southwark was also a favorite area for entertainment like bull and bear-baiting. There was also a famous fair in Southwark which took place near the Church of St. George the Martyr. William Hogarth depicted this fair in his engraving of Southwark Fair (1733).

In 1844 the railway reached Southwark with the opening of London Bridge station.

In 1861 the Great Fire of Southwark destroyed a large number of buildings between Tooley Street and the Thames, including those around Hays Wharf, where Hays Galleria was later built, and blocks to the west almost as far as St Olave’s Church.

In 1899 Southwark was incorporated along with Newington and Walworth into the Metropolitan Borough of Southwark, and in 1965 this was incorporated with the Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell and Metropolitan Borough of Bermondsey into the London Borough of Southwark.

Southwark tube station was opened on 20 November 1999 as part of the Jubilee Line Extension.

The original plan for the Extension did not include a station between those at Waterloo and London Bridge; Southwark station was added after lobbying by the local council. Although it is close to Waterloo, not near the Bankside attractions it was intended to serve, and its only rail interchange is to London Waterloo East mainline station; the passenger usage matches those of other minor central stations. It does however get over double the traffic of nearby Borough station and around triple Lambeth North.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Hopton Street, Borough, 1977.
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Licence: CC BY 2.0
Amen Court, EC4M
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Ayres Street
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Farringdon Street, EC4M
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Hopton’s Almshouses
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Poppins Court EC4
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Georg Giese from Danzig, 34-year-old German merchant at the Steelyard, painted in London by Hans Holbein in 1532
Credit: Hans Holbein
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Licence: CC BY 2.0
Walbrook Wharf is an operating freight wharf located in the City of London adjacent to Cannon Street station.
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Hopton’s Almshouses, Hopton Street, Bankside (1957).
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Wagstaff Buildings, Sumner Road, Bankside, c. 1920.
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Hopton Street, Borough, 1977.
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Tate Modern viewed from Thames pleasure boat (2003)
Credit: Christine Matthews
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Ayres Street
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Hopton’s Almshouses
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In 1824, when Charles Dickens was 12 years old, his father, John Dickens, was arrested and sent to Marshalsea Prison for failure to pay a debt. During this time, Charles (the only member of the family not imprisoned) took up residence in the back-attic of a house on Lant Street, a short walk away from the prison. Lant Street was in an area known as "The Mint" which was notorious for its overcrowded conditions.
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The entrance to the Cardinal Cap Alley is under the lamp, left of the yellow door
Credit: Peter Holmes
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