Little St James’s Street, SW1A

Road in/near St James’s .

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(51.50552 -0.13896, 51.505 -0.138) 
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Road · St James’s · SW1A ·
MARCH
1
2021
Little St James’s Street is a turning off of St James’s Street proper.





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Emma Seif   
Added: 25 Jan 2022 19:06 GMT   

Birth of the Bluestocking Society
In about 1750, Elizabeth Montagu began hosting literary breakfasts in her home at 23 (now 31) Hill Street. These are considered the first meetings of the Bluestocking society.

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Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 21 Feb 2023 11:39 GMT   

Error on 1800 map numbering for John Street
The 1800 map of Whitfield Street (17 zoom) has an error in the numbering shown on the map. The houses are numbered up the right hand side of John Street and Upper John Street to #47 and then are numbered down the left hand side until #81 BUT then continue from 52-61 instead of 82-91.

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TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

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Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:41 GMT   

Baker Street
Baker Street station opened on the Metropolitan Railway - the world’s first underground line.

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Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 30 Jan 2023 11:28 GMT   

The Beatles on a London rooftop
The Beatles’ rooftop concert took place on the rooftop of the Apple Corps building in London. It was their final public performance as a band and was unannounced, attracting a crowd of onlookers. The concert lasted for 42 minutes and included nine songs. The concert is remembered as a seminal moment in the history of rock music and remains one of the most famous rock performances of all time.

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Lived here
Julian    
Added: 23 Mar 2021 10:11 GMT   

Dennis Potter
Author Dennis Potter lived in Collingwood House in the 1970’s

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Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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Lived here
Brian J MacIntyre   
Added: 8 Jan 2023 17:27 GMT   

Malcolm Davey at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square
My former partner, actor Malcolm Davey, lived at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square, for many years until his death. He was a wonderful human being and an even better friend. A somewhat underrated actor, but loved by many, including myself. I miss you terribly, Malcolm. Here’s to you and to History, our favourite subject.
Love Always - Brian J MacIntyre
Minnesota, USA

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Comment
Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   

Bessborough Place, SW1V
I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved London. The stucco houses were a feature and the backs of the houses enabled parents to see thier children playing.

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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Eileen   
Added: 10 Nov 2023 09:42 GMT   

Brecknock Road Pleating Company
My great grandparents ran the Brecknock Road pleating Company around 1910 to 1920 and my Grandmother worked there as a pleater until she was 16. I should like to know more about this. I know they had a beautiful Victorian house in Islington as I have photos of it & of them in their garden.

Source: Family history

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Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2023 16:59 GMT   

061123
Why do Thames Water not collect the 15 . Three meter lengths of blue plastic fencing, and old pipes etc. They left here for the last TWO Years, these cause an obstruction,as they halfway lying in the road,as no footpath down this road, and the cars going and exiting the park are getting damaged, also the public are in Grave Danger when trying to avoid your rubbish and the danger of your fences.

Source: Squirrels Lane. Buckhurst Hill, Essex. IG9. I want some action ,now, not Excuses.MK.

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Christian   
Added: 31 Oct 2023 10:34 GMT   

Cornwall Road, W11
Photo shows William Richard Hoare’s chemist shop at 121 Cornwall Road.

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Vik   
Added: 30 Oct 2023 18:48 GMT   

Old pub sign from the Rising Sun
Hi I have no connection to the area except that for the last 30+ years we’ve had an old pub sign hanging on our kitchen wall from the Rising Sun, Stanwell, which I believe was / is on the Oaks Rd. Happy to upload a photo if anyone can tell me how or where to do that!

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Phillip Martin   
Added: 16 Oct 2023 06:25 GMT   

16 Ashburnham Road
On 15 October 1874 George Frederick Martin was born in 16 Ashburnham Road Greenwich to George Henry Martin, a painter, and Mary Martin, formerly Southern.

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Lived here
Christine Bithrey   
Added: 15 Oct 2023 15:20 GMT   

The Hollies (1860 - 1900)
I lived in Holly Park Estate from 1969 I was 8 years old when we moved in until I left to get married, my mother still lives there now 84. I am wondering if there was ever a cemetery within The Hollies? And if so where? Was it near to the Blythwood Road end or much nearer to the old Methodist Church which is still standing although rather old looking. We spent most of our childhood playing along the old dis-used railway that run directly along Blythwood Road and opposite Holly Park Estate - top end which is where we live/ed. We now walk my mothers dog there twice a day. An elderly gentleman once told me when I was a child that there used to be a cemetery but I am not sure if he was trying to scare us children! I only thought about this recently when walking past the old Methodist Church and seeing the flag stone in the side of the wall with the inscription of when it was built late 1880

If anyone has any answers please email me [email protected]

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Chris hutchison   
Added: 15 Oct 2023 03:04 GMT   

35 broadhurst gardens.
35 Broadhurst gardens was owned by famous opera singer Mr Herman “Simmy”Simberg. He had transformed it into a film and recording complex.
There was a film and animation studio on the ground floor. The recording facilities were on the next two floors.
I arrived in London from Australia in 1966 and worked in the studio as the tea boy and trainee recording engineer from Christmas 1966 for one year. The facility was leased by an American advertising company called Moreno Films. Mr Simbergs company Vox Humana used the studio for their own projects as well. I worked for both of them. I was so lucky. The manager was another wonderful gentleman called Jack Price who went on to create numerous songs for many famous singers of the day and also assisted the careers of Bob Marley and Jimmy Cliff. “Simmy” let me live in the bedsit,upper right hand window. Jack was also busy with projects with The Troggs,Bill Wyman,Peter Frampton. We did some great sessions with Manfred Mann and Alan Price. The Cream did some demos but that was before my time. We did lots of voice over work. Warren Mitchell and Ronnie Corbett were favourites. I went back in 1978 and “Simmy “ had removed all of the studio and it was now his home. His lounge room was still our studio in my minds eye!!


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Sue L   
Added: 13 Oct 2023 17:21 GMT   

Duffield Street, Battersea
I’ve been looking for ages for a photo of Duffield Street without any luck.
My mother and grandfather lived there during the war. It was the first property he was able to buy but sadly after only a few months they were bombed out. My mother told the story that one night they were aware of a train stopping above them in the embankment. It was full of soldiers who threw out cigarettes and sweets at about four in the morning. They were returning from Dunkirk though of course my mother had no idea at the time. I have heard the same story from a different source too.

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
An Omnibus Ride to Piccadilly Circus An Omnibus Ride to Piccadilly Circus, Mr Gladstone Travelling with Ordinary Passengers, 1885
Royal Society The Royal Society is a self-governing Fellowship of many of the world’s most distinguished scientists drawn from all areas of science, engineering and medicine.
Shepherd Market Shepherd Market was described by Arthur Bingham Walkley in 1925 as one of the oddest incongruities in London.
St James’s St James’s is an exclusive area in the West End of London.

NEARBY STREETS
Albany Courtyard, SW1Y The courtyard is named after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, who in 1791 purchased Melbourne House which stood on this site.
Albany, W1B The Albany is an apartment complex in Piccadilly, established in 1802.
Albemarle Street, W1S Albemarle Street takes its name from the second Duke of Albermarle, son of General Monk.
Ambassador’s Court, SW1A Ambassador’s Court is a block on Ambassador’s Court.
Ambassador’s Court, SW1A Ambassador’s Court is part of the St James’s Palace complex.
Angel Court, SW1Y Angel Court is named after a long demolished inn of this name.
Apple Tree Yard, SW1Y Apple Tree Yard is thought named after the apple trees formerly to be found here.
Arlington House, SW1A Arlington House is now part of an exclusive residential development.
Arlington Street, SW1A Arlington Street is named after Henry Bennet, 1st Earl of Arlington, 17th century statesman and local landowner.
Ashburton Place, W1J Ashburton Place connects Clarges Street and Bolton Street.
Babmaes Street, SW1Y Babmaes Street was originally called Wells Street.
Bennet Street, SW1A Bennet Street lies off St James’s Street.
Bennett House, SW1A Bennett House is located on Bennet Street.
Berkeley House, W1J Berkeley House is a block on Hay Hill.
Berkeley Street, W1J Berkeley Street runs from Piccadilly to Berkeley Square.
Blue Ball Yard, SW1A Blue Ball Yard is first mentioned in 1672 when its site was sold by King Charles II.
Blue Bridge, SW1A Blue Bridge crosses St James’s Park lake.
Bolton Street, W1J Bolton Street runs from Curzon Street in the north to Piccadilly in the south.
Bridgewater House, SW1A Bridgewater House is a block on Cleveland Row.
Broughton House, W1S Broughton House is located on Sackville Street.
Burlington Arcade, SW1Y Burlington Arcade is a covered shopping arcade, 179 metres in length, that runs from Piccadilly to Burlington Gardens.
Bury Street, SW1A Bury Street runs north-to-south from Jermyn Street to King Street, crossing Ryder Street.
Carlton Gardens, SW1Y Carlton Gardens was developed before 1832.
Carlton House Terrace, SW1Y Carlton House Terrace consists of a pair of terraces - white stucco-faced houses on the south side of the street overlooking St James’s Park.
Catherine Wheel Yard, SW1A Catherine Wheel Yard is named after an inn that stood on this site until it burnt down in 1895.
Charles II Street, SW1Y Charles II Street is named for the ’Merry Monarch’.
Chatham House, SW1Y Chatham House is a building on St James’s Square.
Church Place, SW1Y Church Place was named after the adjacent St James’s Church, Piccadilly.
Clarges Mews, W1J Clarges Mews is a mews at the top of Clarges Street.
Clarges Street, W1J Clarges Street runs north from Piccadilly.
Cleveland Row, SW1A Cleveland Row – after Cleveland House (now Bridgwater House), named for Barbara Palmer, 1st Duchess of Cleveland who lived there in the late 17th century.
Cleveland Yard, SW1Y Cleveland Yard is now the site of Cleveland Place.
Clydesdale Bank House, W1J Clydesdale Bank House is a block on Piccadilly.
Colette House, W1J Colette House is a block on Piccadilly.
Constitution Hill, SW1A Constitution Hill connects Buckingham Palace with Hyde Park Corner.
Crown Passage, SW1A Crown Passage is thought to be after a former tavern of the name.
Curzonfield House, W1J Curzonfield House is a building on Curzon Street.
Dalmeny Court, SW1Y Dalmeny Court is a block on Duke Street.
Dartmouth House, W1J Dartmouth House is a block on Charles Street.
Denman House, W1J Denman House is a block on Piccadilly.
Devonshire House, W1J Devonshire House is a block on Piccadilly.
Dover Street, W1J Dover Street is notable for its Georgian architecture as well as the location of historic London clubs and hotels.
Dudley House, SW1A Dudley House is situated at 169 Piccadilly.
Duke Of York Street, SW1Y Duke Of York Street runs between Jermyn Street and St James’s Square.
Duke Street St James’s, SW1Y Duke Street St James’s is named after James II, Duke of York when the street was built and brother to Charles II, king at the time.
Eagle Place, SW1Y Eagle Place lies off Piccadilly.
Egyptian House, W1J Egyptian House is a block on Piccadilly.
Empire House, W1J Empire House is a block on Piccadilly.
Fitzmaurice Place, W1J Fitzmaurice Place is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
French Railway House, SW1Y French Railway House occupies 178-180 Piccadilly.
French Railways House, W1J French Railways House is a building on Piccadilly.
Garrick House, W1J Residential block
Glendore House, W1J Glendore House is a block on Clarges Street.
Half Moon Street, W1J Half Moon Street runs between Piccadilly and Curzon Street.
Hay Hill, W1S Hay Hill is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Haymarket, SW1Y Haymarket – site of a former market selling hay until the 1830s.
Huguenot House, WC2H Huguenot House is a block on Panton Street.
Jermyn Street, SW1Y Jermyn Street is the main east-west road of St James’s.
King Street, SW1Y King Street leads from St James’s Street to St James’s Square.
Landsdowne Row, W1J Landsdowne Row is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Lansdowne House, W1J Lansdowne House is a block on Berkeley Square.
Lansdowne Row, W1J Lansdowne Row is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Lower Regent Street, SW1Y Lower Regent Street is the name for the part of Regent Street which lies south of Piccadilly Circus.
Malta House, W1J Malta House is a building on Piccadilly.
Marlborough Road, SW1Y Marlborough Road was named after the adjacent Marlborough House, built for Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough in 1711.
Masons Yard, SW1Y Mason’s Yard was named for the local 18th century victualler Henry Mason.
Mayfair Place, W1J Mayfair Place runs behind Devonshire House.
New Zealand House, SW1Y New Zealand House is a block on Haymarket.
Nightingale House, W1J Nightingale House is a block on Curzon Street.
Norris Street, SW1Y Norris Street – after Godfrye Norris, local leaseholder in the 17th century.
Nuffield House, W1J Nuffield House is located on Piccadilly.
Old Bond Street, W1J Old Bond Street was named for Sir Thomas Bond, a property developer from Peckham who laid out a number of streets in this part of the West End.
Ormond Yard, SW1Y Ormond Yard was named after James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde, who owned a house next to this yard in the 17th century.
OverSeas House, SW1A OverSeas House is a block on Park Place.
Pall Mall, SW1Y Pall Mall was laid out as grounds for playing pall mall in the 17th century.
Park Place, SW1A Park Place is named after nearby Green Park.
Piccadilly Arcade, SW1Y Piccadilly Arcade was named after Piccadilly Hall, home of local tailor Robert Baker in the 17th century.
Piccadilly Place, SW1Y Piccadilly Place is an alleyway leading to Vine Street.
Piccadilly, SW1Y Piccadilly is one of the main London streets.
Piccadilly, W1J Piccadilly is a major road in the West End.
Pickering Place, SW1A Thought to be the smallest public open space in London, Pickering Place is perhaps most famous for being the location of the last public duel in England.
Pickering Place, SW1Y Pickering Place is London’s smallest square.
Princes Arcade, SW1Y Princes Arcade, built 1929–33, was named after the former Prince’s Hotel, which stood here.
Red Wolf House, W1J Red Wolf House is a block on Bolton Street.
Rex House, SW1Y Rex House is a building on Regent Street.
Rose and Crown Yard, SW1Y Rose and Crown Yard was probably named after a former inn of this name.
Royal Arcade, W1S Royal Arcade is an alleyway of exclusive shops.
Royal Opera Arcade, SW1Y Royal Opera Arcade was originally part of an opera house theatre, built by John Nash.
Russell Court, SW1A Russell Court is named after the Russell family, who lived here in the 1600s.
Ryder Street, SW1A Ryder Street was named after Richard Rider, Master Carpenter to Charles II.
Ryger House, SW1A Ryger House is located on Arlington Street.
Sabadell House, SW1Y Sabadell House is a block on Pall Mall.
Sackville Street, W1B Sackville Street runs north from Piccadilly.
Samuel House, SW1Y Samuel House is located on St Alban’s Street.
Savile House, W1J Savile House is a block on Berkeley Street.
Scandia House, W1S Scandia House is a building on Albemarle Street.
Shepherd Market, W1J Shepherd Market was developed between 1735 and 1746 by Edward Shepherd from an open area called Brook Field
Spencer House, SW1A Spencer House is a block on St James’s Place.
St Alban’s House, SW1 St Alban’s House is a block on Haymarket.
St Alban’s House, SW1Y St Alban’s House can be found on Haymarket.
St Albans Street, SW1Y St Albans Street was named after Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of Saint Albans, 17th century politician and local landowner.
St James’s Market, SW1Y St James’s Market was part of the site of St James’s leper hospital in the Middle Ages, named after James, son of Zebedee.
St James’s Chambers, SW1Y St James’s Chambers is a block located at 9 Ryder Street.
St James’s Place, SW1A St James’s Place runs west from St James’s Street.
St James’s Square, SW1Y St James’s Square is the only square in the district of St James’s.
St James’s Street, SW1A St James’s Street is a main road of the West End running from Pall Mall to Piccadilly.
Stable Yard Road, SW1A Stable Yard Road leads from The Mall to Clarence House.
Stafford House, W1S Stafford House is sited on Stafford Street.
Stafford Street, W1S Stafford Street is named after Margaret Stafford, partner of developer Sir Thomas Bond who built on this site in the seventeenth century.
Standbrook House, W1S Standbrook House is a block on Old Bond Street.
Stratton House, W1J Stratton House is a block on Stratton Street.
Stratton Street, W1J Stratton Street forms an L shape between Piccadilly and Berkeley Street.
Swan House, W1S Swan House can be found on Old Bond Street.
The Bank Building, SW1A The Bank Building is located on St James’s Street.
The Economist Building, SW1A The Economist Building can be found on St James’s Street.
The Mall, SW1Y The Mall is the processional route between Trafalgar Square and Buckingham Palace.
The Ritz Arcade, SW1A The Ritz Arcade lies outside The Ritz Hotel.
Waterloo Place, SW1Y Waterloo Place, an extension of Regent Street, is awash with statues and monuments that honour heroes of the British Empire.
White Horse Street, W1J White Horse Street runs from Piccadilly to Shepherd Street.
Yarmouth Place, W1J Yarmouth Place lies off Brick Street.

NEARBY PUBS
The Clarence The Clarence is located diagonally opposite the Ritz.
The Kings Head The Kings Head dates from 1710.


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St James’s

St James’s is an exclusive area in the West End of London.

St James’s was once part of the same royal park as Green Park and St James’s Park. In the 1660s, Charles II gave the right to develop the area to Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans, who proceeded to develop it as a predominantly aristocratic residential area with a grid of streets centered on St James’s Square. Until the Second World War, St James’s remained one of the most exclusive residential enclaves in London. Famous residences in St James’s include St James’s Palace, Clarence House, Marlborough House, Lancaster House, Spencer House, Schomberg House and Bridgewater House.

St James’s is the home of many of the best known gentlemen’s clubs in London. The clubs found here are organisations of English high society. A variety of groups congregate here, such as royals, military officers, motoring enthusiasts and other groups.

It is now a predominantly commercial area with some of the highest rents in London and, consequently, the world. The auction house Christie’s is based in King Street, and the surrounding streets contain a great many upmarket art and antique dealers.

Office space to rent in St James’s is among the most expensive in the world, costing up to five times average rents in New York, Paris and Sydney.

The area is home to fine wine merchants including Berry Brothers and Rudd, at 3 St James’s Street. Adjoining St James’s Street is Jermyn Street, famous for its many tailors. St James’s is home to some of the most famous cigar retailers in London. At 35 St James’s Street is Davidoff of London, 19 St James’s Street is home to J.J. Fox and 50 Jermyn St has Dunhill.

The iconic English shoemaker Wildsmith - which designed the first ever loafer - was located at 41 Duke Street, St, James’s. It is now currently located at 13 Savile Row.

The area has a good number of art galleries, covering a spectrum of tastes. The White Cube gallery, which has represented Damien Hirst and Tracey Emin, originally opened in Duke Street, St James’s, then moved to Hoxton Square. In September 2006, it opened a second gallery in St James’s at 25–26 Mason’s Yard, off Duke Street, on a plot previously occupied by an electricity sub-station. The gallery was the first free-standing building to be built in the St James’s area for more than 30 years.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Transmission
TUM image id: 1509553463
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Get Back
Credit: Stable Diffusion
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Licence: CC BY 2.0
The 52 bus
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In the neighbourhood...

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Get Back
Credit: Stable Diffusion
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Piccadilly Theatre (2007)
Credit: Turquoisefish
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The Marie Antoinette Suite at the Ritz Hotel, Piccadilly (1914)
Credit: Architectural Record Company, New York
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Truefitt & Hill products Truefitt & Hill is the oldest barbershop in the world, as certified by Guinness Book of World Records in April 2000. Truefitt was established in 1805 by William Francis Truefitt. Truefitt styled himself as hairdresser to the British Royal Court and the firm received their first Royal Warrant from King George III. In 1911, Edwin Hill set up a barber shop on Old Bond Street, also near the royal neighbourhoods in London and it was to this address H.P. Truefitt (William’s nephew) moved in 1935 to create Truefitt & Hill. The present location of Truefitt & Hill at 71 St James’s Street, was taken up in 1994.
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A Friday Evening Discourse at the Royal Institution; Sir James Dewar on Liquid Hydrogen (1904)
Credit: Henry Jamyn Brooks
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Royal Academy of Arts, Burlington House, Piccadilly
Credit: Simon Gunzinger
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The Queen’s Theatre in the West End (2011), then showing the musical "Les Misérables"
Credit: Andreas Praefcke
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London Library, 14 St James’s Square. The London Library is a self-supporting, independent institution. It is a registered charity whose sole aim is the advancement of education, learning and knowledge. The adjacent building (13 St James’s Square) is the High Commission of Cyprus.
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Albany Courtyard leads to The Albany
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Musicians waiting for work on Archer Street. In the twentieth century, Archer Street became known as a meeting point for West End musicians. The street became this hub due to its proximity to workplaces (nearby theatres and clubs) and places to drink and socialise. The Apollo and The Lyric both had stage doors which opened onto the street. Meanwhile, the Musicians’ Union London Branch was also here - musicians would go there between a matinee and an evening performance in the many theatres nearby, or to find a deputy, or just to meet friends and colleagues.
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