St Olaves Cottage, N4

Road in/near Manor House

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(51.57116 -0.09375, 51.571 -0.093) 
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Road · Manor House · N4 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

St Olaves Cottage is one of the streets of London in the N4 postal area.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Born here
Vanessa Whitehouse   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 22:48 GMT   

Born here
My dad 1929 John George Hall

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Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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Jeff Owen   
Added: 19 Mar 2021 13:49 GMT   

Swift House, N16
Swift House was completed in 1956. I moved into No 12 when it was brand new. The bock consisted of 12 residences. The six on the ground floor were three bedroomed maisonettes with gardens. The six on the top floor were a mixture of two bedroomed flats (2), one bedroomed flats (2) and what were then called "one unit" flats (2) which were in fact bedsits. There was a similar block opposite named Dryden House (all the flats on the Hawksley Court Estate were named after famous writers). It was a lovely flat which my Mum & Dad cherished, having moved from two rooms which they’d had since they were married.

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Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 15:44 GMT   

Memories of "The Londesborough"
I lived in Sandbrook Road from 1956 until 1964 and then in Harcombe Road until 1994. “The Londesborough” was my local in my formative drinking years.

It was a pub typical of its time. Clean and tidy and well run by a proper guv’nor who stood no nonsense. It had a single island bartop serving three separate bars. The Public Bar had its door on the corner of Londesborough Road and had a dart board. The other two shared a single entrance on the right as you look at the pub. The Saloon bar formed the majority of the pub and was the most plush. It extended to the back of the premises with the back portion ’ at a slightly lower level ’ housing a full size snooker table. The small Private bar was between the other two. I recall that prices were a penny or two more in the Saloon bar.

The first landlord I remember was Bob Baker. He and his wife Else ran the pub until about 1969-ish. Bob was a retired coalminer from Leicester. He had two daughters - Penny and Jane ’ who would very occasionally work behind the bar. Bob had a full time live-in barman/cellarman by the name of Gwyn Evans, who could be a bit temperamental at times! My Dad also worked there from time to time and I recall being invited upstairs to watch the 1961 FA Cup Final between Spurs and Leicester City. Following Bob’s retirement Lou Levine and his wife Pearl took the helm. Lou was a fine guv’nor and the pub flourished under his tenancy. When I left the area I believe Lou still had the tenancy but had put a manager, whose name I cannot recall, in overall charge.

Saturday evening and Sunday lunchtimes the pub was packed. But it also had a good patronage during the week. Among the occasional visitors was Eric Bristow, the late world champion darts player. Eric would challenge the locals to a game and would even things up a bit by throwing his darts from the kneeling position! Footballer and former England manager Terry Venables could also be found there from time to time as one of his pals was the son of Lou’s business partner.

The pub has certainly gone upmarket (as has that small area) but I will take issue with one claim made on its website: “In the 1960’s, the Londesborough was one of the pubs that the notorious Kray Twins took a drink in.” My Dad knew just about everybody who “took a drink” in the Londesborough in the 1960s and Bob Baker knew absolutely everybody. We often spoke about the Kray twins (their “manor” was the other side of Stoke Newington High Street). No mention of them visiting the pub was ever made by them or any other of the locals. One other slight correction: the map on this website is slightly incorrect. The pub is on the corner of Londesborough Road and Barbauld Road, and not as indicated.

The pub had one big drawback. It was a "Watneys" Pub. But you can’t have everything!

Source: The Londesborough

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David Gibbs   
Added: 3 May 2021 16:48 GMT   

73 Bus Crash in Albion Rd 1961
From a Newspaper cutting of which I have a copy with photo. On Tuesday August 15th 1961 a 73 bus destined for Mortlake at 8.10am. The bus had just turned into Albion Road when the driver passed out, apparently due to a heart attack, and crashed into a wall on the western side of Albion Road outside No 207. The bus driver, George Jefferies aged 56 of Observatory Road, East Sheen, died after being trapped in his cab when he collided with a parked car. Passengers on the bus were thrown from their seats as it swerved. Several fainted, and ambulances were called. The bus crashed into a front garden and became jammed against a wall. The car driver, who had just parked, suffered shock.

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Janet Creed (nee Burke)   
Added: 31 Aug 2017 14:46 GMT   

Campbell road
My father was William Burke, 74 Campbell road n4 my mother was May wright of Campbell road, I was born on 13.02.1953, we stayed with my grandparents in Campbell Road, William and Maggie Wright.

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Jeff Owen   
Added: 19 Mar 2021 15:28 GMT   

Galsworthy Terrace, N16
Galsworthy Terrace was opposite Swift House, where I lived from 1956 to 1964. My pal Roger Beamish lived at No 1, just adjacent to the slope which joins Sandbrook Road to Woodlea Road. When I first lived there the plot that now accommodates Stowe House was a rock garden containing a wide flight of steps and a sloped pathway. Other occupants of Galsworthy Terrace were the Lake family, good friends with my Mum, and the Walker family. Mr Walker ran the Hawksley Court Tenants’ Club for many years and he would organise an annual "beano" usually to Margate.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


   
Added: 25 Apr 2022 22:11 GMT   

Southover, N12
Everyone knows Central Woodside is the place to be. Ever since kdog moved from finchtown, Woodside has been thriving.

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Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

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Brian Lynch   
Added: 10 Apr 2022 13:38 GMT   

Staples Mattress Factory
An architect’s design of the Staples Mattress Factory
An image found on the website of Dalzell’s Beds, in Armagh Northern Ireland.

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Lived here
   
Added: 19 Feb 2022 16:21 GMT   

Harmondsworth (1939 - 1965)
I lived in a house (Lostwithiel) on the Bath Road opposite the junction with Tythe Barn Lane, now a hotel site. Initially, aircraft used one of the diagonal runways directly in line with our house. I attended Sipson Primary School opposite the Three Magpies and celebrated my 21st birthday at The Peggy Bedford in 1959.

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Emma Seif   
Added: 25 Jan 2022 19:06 GMT   

Birth of the Bluestocking Society
In about 1750, Elizabeth Montagu began hosting literary breakfasts in her home at 23 (now 31) Hill Street. These are considered the first meetings of the Bluestocking society.

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Comment
   
Added: 14 Jan 2022 03:06 GMT   

Goldbourne Gardens W 10
I lived in Goldbourne Gardens in the 50,s very happy big bomb site

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Chris Nash   
Added: 10 Jan 2022 22:54 GMT   

Shortlands Close, DA17
Shortlands Close and the flats along it were constructed in the mid-1990s. Prior to this, the area was occupied by semi-detached houses with large gardens, which dated from the post-war period and were built on the site of Railway Farm. The farm and its buildings spanned the length of Abbey Road, on the south side of the North Kent Line railway tracks.

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Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Manor House Manor House station was named after a nearby pub.

NEARBY STREETS
Adolphus Road, N4 Adolphus Road is one of the streets of London in the N4 postal area.
Alexandra Grove, N4 Alexandra Grove is one of the streets of London in the N4 postal area.
Alexandra Road, N4 Alexandra Road is a location in London.
Ashdale House, N4 Residential block
Christina Square, N4 Christina Square is one of the streets of London in the N4 postal area.
City View Apartments, N4 City View Apartments is a location in London.
Coster Avenue, N4 Coster Avenue is a location in London.
Devan Grove, N4 Devan Grove is a location in London.
Eade Roa, N4 Eade Roa is one of the streets of London in the N4 postal area.
Eade Road, N4 Eade Road is one of the streets of London in the N4 postal area.
Goodchild Road, N4 Goodchild Road is a road in the N4 postcode area
Green Lanes Gate, N4 Green Lanes Gate is a road in the N4 postcode area
Green Lanes, N4 Green Lanes is one of the streets of London in the N4 postal area.
Henry Road, N4 Henry Road is one of the streets of London in the N4 postal area.
Hermitage Works, N4 Hermitage Works is one of the streets of London in the N4 postal area.
Kayani Avenue, N4 Kayani Avenue is a road in the N4 postcode area
Kingsmere Place, N16 A street within the N16 postcode
Linkway, N4 Linkway is a location in London.
Lordship Road, N4 Lordship Road is a road in the N4 postcode area
New Court, N16 New Court is one of the streets of London in the N16 postal area.
New River Gate, N4 New River Gate is a road in the N4 postcode area
New River Path, N4 New River Path is a road in the N4 postcode area
Pemberton Practice, N4 Pemberton Practice is one of the streets of London in the N4 postal area.
Pickering House, N4 Residential block
Portland Rise, N4 Portland Rise is one of the streets of London in the N4 postal area.
Princes Close, N4 Princes Close is a road in the N4 postcode area
River Studio, N4 River Studio is one of the streets in the Twickenham postal district.
Rowley Gardens, N4 Rowley Gardens is a road in the N4 postcode area
Scrimgoeur Place, N4 Scrimgoeur Place is a location in London.
Seven Sisters Road, N4 In 1833, Seven Sisters Road was laid out providing a link from Tottenham to Holloway.
Spring Park Drive, N4 Spring Park Drive is one of the streets of London in the N4 postal area.
Springpark Drive, N4 Springpark Drive is one of the streets of London in the N4 postal area.
Swan Lane, N4 Swan Lane is a location in London.
Town Court Path, N4 Town Court Path is a location in London.
Towncourt Path, N4 Towncourt Path is a road in the N4 postcode area
Vale Road, N4 Vale Road is one of the streets of London in the N4 postal area.
Woodberry Down, N4 Woodberry Down is one of the streets of London in the N4 postal area.
Woodberry Grove, N4 Woodberry Grove is one of the streets of London in the N4 postal area.
Woodview Close, N4 Woodview Close is one of the streets of London in the N4 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
The Finsbury This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Happy Man This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Manor House

Manor House station was named after a nearby pub.

Situated at the junction of Seven Sisters Road and Green Lanes, it was opened on 19 September 1932.

It was designed by Charles Holden and, on the Piccadilly Line, it lies between Finsbury Park and Turnpike Lane stations. The sub-surface areas of the station were tiled in biscuit coloured tiles lined with blue friezes.

Like other stations on the 1932 Cockfosters extension, Manor House set new aesthetic standards. The station tunnels have a diameter of 7 metres and were designed for the greater volume of traffic expected. The provision of ’suicide pits’ between the rails was also innovative.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
View of Nicholls House on the Woodberry Down Estate from the northeast (1981) Built in the late 1940s, the Woodberry Down Estate fell on hard times and was largely demolished in the early twenty first century.
Credit: Prof. Miles Glendinning
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Looking north up Seven Sisters Road at Finsbury Park on 26 July 1932. The photo looks towards Manor House. Stroud Green Road is on left followed by the trees of Finsbury Park. Cars are coming out on right from Blackstock Road.
Credit: Fox Photos/Getty Images
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Queen’s Drive, N4 with its typical turn-of-the-twentieth-century architecture stretches south east from Finsbury Park.
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
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Postcard from the turn of the twentieth century titled ’Finsbury Park - A shady walk’
Old London postcard
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Seven Sisters Road and Woodberry Down (1895)
Credit: Hackney Library Services
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