Bow Church

Church in/near Bow, existing until now

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Bow Church

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Church · Bow · E3 ·
MARCH
8
2020

Bow Church is the parish church of St Mary and Holy Trinity, Stratford, Bow.

There has been a church on the same site for over 700 years.

A chapel of ease on the site was licensed by Bishop Ralph Baldock of London on 17 November 1311 for the people of Stratford-at-Bow within the parish of Stepney. Before this date, churchgoers had had to travel to St Dunstan’s, Stepney. The present building is thought to have a 14th-century structure and the tower was added in the 15th century. It is constructed of Kentish Ragstone with brick additions.

The chapel of ease arrangement allowed parishioners to practise their religion locally, but were still obliged to attend St Dunstan’s at Stepney on religious holidays and to help pay for the church’s upkeep.

In 1497, an agreement was reached, whereby the people of Bow promised to acknowledge themselves as parishioners of Stepney and agreed to pay 24 shillings annually for repairs of the mother church. They could now dispense with their attendance there.

In 1556, during the reign of Mary I, many people were brought by cart from Newgate and burned at the stake in front of Bow Church. These included the thirteen ’Stratford Martyrs’.

In 1719, the parish became independent and St Mary, Stratford, Bow, was consecrated.

The church suffered considerable bomb damage during the Second World War. The site was visited by Queen Elizabeth (later the Queen Mother) in 1951 to mark the start of a campaign to restore the church with the work was overseen by the architect H S Goodhart-Rendel. The bell tower was reconstructed.

During 2011, the church celebrated 700 years of Christian life on the site.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


Parish church of St Mary with Holy Trinity, Bow Road

Parish church of St Mary with Holy Trinity, Bow Road
Gordon Joly

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Bow Bow lies at the heart of London’s East End.
Bow Church Bow Church is the parish church of St Mary and Holy Trinity, Stratford, Bow.
Bow railway works Bow railway works was built in 1853 by the North London Railway.
Bromley-by-Bow Bromley-by-Bow is a district located on the western banks of the River Lea, in the Lower Lea Valley in east London.
Walford Walford is a fictional borough of east London in the BBC soap opera EastEnders.

NEARBY STREETS
Addington Road, E3 Addington Road is a road in the E3 postcode area
Arnold Road, E3 Arnold Road is a road in the E3 postcode area
Arrow Road, E3 Arrow Road is a road in the E3 postcode area
Baldock Street, E3 Baldock Street is a road in the E3 postcode area
Barbers Road, E15 Barbers Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Birchdown House, E3 Residential block
Blackwall Tunnel Northern Approach, E3 Blackwall Tunnel Northern Approach is a road in the E3 postcode area
Blondin Street, E3 Blondin Street is a road in the E3 postcode area
Bow Arts Lane, E3 Bow Arts Lane is a road in the E3 postcode area
Bromley High Street, E3 Bromley High Street is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Bruce Road, E3 Bruce Road is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Brymay Close, E3 Brymay Close is a road in the E3 postcode area
Campbell Road, E3 Campbell Road is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Caxton Grove, E3 Caxton Grove is a road in the E3 postcode area
Central House, E15 A street within the E15 postcode
Clearun Wharf Marshgate Lane, E15 Clearun Wharf Marshgate Lane is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Cooks Road, E15 Cooks Road dates from the 1850s - built to provide access to the East London Soap Works (manufacturers of Cook’s Primrose Soap).
Corbin House, E3 Residential block
Dimson Crescent, E3 Dimson Crescent is a road in the E3 postcode area
Eagling Close, E3 Eagling Close is a road in the E3 postcode area
Eastside Mews, E3 Eastside Mews is a road in the E3 postcode area
Edgar Road, E3 Edgar Road is a road in the E3 postcode area
Eleanor Street, E3 Eleanor Street is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Fairfield Road, E3 Fairfield Road is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Four Seasons Close, E3 Four Seasons Close is a road in the E3 postcode area
Foxley House, E3 Residential block
Gr, E15 A street within the E15 postcode
Grace Street, E3 Grace Street is a road in the E3 postcode area
Hancock Road, E15 Hancock Road is a road in the E15 postcode area
Hancock Road, E3 Hancock Road is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Hartfield Terrace, E3 Hartfield Terrace is a road in the E3 postcode area
Heylyn Square, E3 Heylyn Square is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Hunts Lane, E15 Hunts Lane is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Imperial Street, E3 Imperial Street is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Jebb Street, E3 Jebb Street is a road in the E3 postcode area
Kitcat Terrace, E3 Kitcat Terrace is not named after chocolate but instead the Reverend Henry Kitcat.
Lawrence Close, E3 Lawrence Close is a road in the E3 postcode area
Lexington Building, E3 Lexington Building is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Mallard Point, E3 Mallard Point is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Manhattan Building, E3 Manhattan Building is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Marshgate Lane, E15 Marshgate Lane is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Meesons Wharf, E15 Meesons Wharf is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Mornington Grove, E3 Mornington Grove is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Morville Street, E3 Morville Street is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Otis Street, E3 Otis Street is a road in the E3 postcode area
Paton Close, E3 Paton Close is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Patrick Connolly Gardens, E3 Patrick Connolly Gardens is a road in the E3 postcode area
Payne Road, E3 Payne Road is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Powis Road, E3 Powis Road is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Priory Street, E3 Priory Street is a road in the E3 postcode area
Rainhill Way, E3 Rainhill Way is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Redwood Close, E3 Redwood Close is a road in the E3 postcode area
Regent Square, E3 Regent Square is a road in the E3 postcode area
Ridgdale Street, E3 Ridgdale Street is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Saint Leonard’s Street, E3 This is a street in the E3 postcode area
Springwood Close, E3 Springwood Close is a road in the E3 postcode area
St Leonards Street, E3 St Leonards Street is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
St. Pauls Way, E14 A street within the E15 postcode
Stroudley Walk, E3 Stroudley Walk is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Sugar House Lane, E15 Sugar House Lane is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Sugar House Yard, E15 Sugar House Yard is a road in the E15 postcode area
Taft Way, E3 Taft Way is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Talwin Street, E3 Talwin Street is a road in the E3 postcode area
Thomas Fyre Drive, E3 Thomas Fyre Drive is a road in the E3 postcode area
Tomlin’s Grove, E3 Tomlin’s Grove is a road in the E3 postcode area
Washington Close, E3 Washington Close is a road in the E3 postcode area
Wellington Way, E3 Wellington Way is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
William Guy Gardens, E3 William Guy Gardens is one of the streets of London in the E3 postal area.
Wrexham Road, E3 Wrexham Road is a road in the E3 postcode area


Queen's Park

Queen's Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen's Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen's Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen's Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen's Park 'proper' formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen's Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen's Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett's wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen's Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queens Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen's Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway (LNWR) on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen's Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen's Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR. As of December 2013, no mainline services calling at the station and the Watford service has been transferred to London Overground.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Olympic Stadium
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Old Ford Nature Reserve
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Old River Lea
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201306080018
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201306080018
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201306080018
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Limehouse Causeway (1936)
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East India Road, Poplar
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