The Prince of Wales Cinema

Cinema in/near Queen’s Park, existed between 1934 and 1968

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Cinema · * · ·
August
3
2015

The Prince of Wales Cinema was located at 331 Harrow Road.

Located in Westbourne Park, the Prince of Wales’ Cinema was built on the site of an earlier Prince of Wales’ Picture Playhouse (1912-1934) which had 650 seats and was designed by architect M. Wilson. The new cinema was built for W.C. Dawes’ Modern Cinemas circuit, a small independent chain of cinemas in west London.

It opened on 27 October 1934 with Tom Walls in “A Cup of Kindness” and George Arliss in “The House of Rothschild”. Architects J. Stanley Beard and W.R. Bennett designed a pleasing Art Deco style cinema which was equipped for cine/variety programmes. The facade of the building was clad in cream faiance tiles and had three large windows in the centre which let in light to the large foyer. Seating was provided in stalls and balcony levels and the auditorium was illuminated by indirect lighting.

It was taken over by John Maxwell’s Associated British Cinemas (ABC) chain from 19 February 1935 and they continued to operate it throughout its uneventful life. It was closed on 23 November 1968.

It was converted into a Mecca Bingo Club from 1970 which continued for many years, latterly operated by the independent Jasmine Bingo Club chain. It closed in September 1996 when Jasmine went bankrupt and all their assets were frozen. The Prince of Wales was sold to property developers and was demolished in August 1997, housing was built on the site.

Text: cinematreasures.org


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:30 GMT   

Kilburn Park - opened 1915
Kilburn Park station was opened at the height of the First World War

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Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:49 GMT   

A bit of a lift....
Kilburn Park was the first station to be designed around escalators, rather than lifts.

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Comment
Joan Clarke   
Added: 2 Feb 2021 10:54 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My late aunt Ivy Clarke (nee Burridge) lived with her whole family at 19 Avondale Park Gardens, according to the 1911 census and she was still there in 1937.What was it like in those days, I wonder, if the housing was only built in 1920?


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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:48 GMT   

Mary Place Workhouse
There was a lady called Ivy who lived in the corner she use to come out an tell us kids off for climbing over the fence to play football on the green. Those were the days.

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Comment
charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

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Dave Fahey   
Added: 6 Jan 2021 02:40 GMT   

Bombing of the Jack O Newberry
My maternal grandfather, Archie Greatorex, was the licensee of the Earl of Warwick during the Second World War. My late mother Vera often told the story of the bombing of the Jack. The morning after the pub was bombed, the landlord’s son appeared at the Warwick with the pub’s till on an old pram; he asked my grandfather to pay the money into the bank for him. The poor soul was obviously in shock. The previous night, his parents had taken their baby down to the pub cellar to shelter from the air raids. The son, my mother never knew his name, opted to stay in his bedroom at the top of the building. He was the only survivor. I often wondered what became of him.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 24 Nov 2020 14:25 GMT   

The 1879 Agricultural Show
The 1879 Royal Agricultural Society of England’s annual show was held on an area which later became Queen’s Park and opened on 30 June 1879.

The show ran for a week but the poor weather meant people had to struggle through deep mud and attendances fell disastrously. The visit to the show by Queen Victoria on the fifth day rallied visitors and nearly half the people who visited the show went on that day.

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Comment
GRaleigh   
Added: 23 Feb 2021 09:34 GMT   

Found a bug
Hi all! Thank you for your excellent site. I found an overlay bug on the junction of Glengall Road, NW6 and Hazelmere Road, NW6 on the 1950 map only. It appears when one zooms in at this junction and only on the zoom.

Cheers,
Geoff Raleigh

Source: Glengall Road, NW6

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The Underground Map   
Added: 25 Feb 2021 13:11 GMT   

Glengall Road, NW6
Thanks Geoff!

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Lived here
Brenda Jackson   
Added: 13 Aug 2017 21:39 GMT   

83 Pembroke Road
My Gt Gt grandparents lived at 83 Pembroke Road before it became Granville Road, They were married in 1874, John Tarrant and Maryann Tarrant nee Williamson.

Her brother George Samuel Williamson lived at 95 Pembroke Road with his wife Emily and children in the 1881 Census

Apparently the extended family also lived for many years in Alpha Place, Canterbury Road, Peel Road,

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 28 Dec 2020 08:31 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
I was born in Hammersmith Hospital (Ducane Rd) I lived at 40 Blecynden Street from birth in 1942 to 1967 when I moved due to oncoming demolition for the West way flyover.
A bomb fell locally during the war and cracked one of our windows, that crack was still there the day I left.
It was a great street to have grown up in I have very fond memories of living there.



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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:30 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Went to school St Johns with someone named Barry Green who lived in that St. Use to wait for him on the corner take a slow walk an end up being late most days.

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 8 Jun 2021 08:08 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Lived here #40 1942-1967

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Comment
Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:17 GMT   

Hewer Street W10
John Nodes Undertakers Hewer Street W10

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Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:27 GMT   

Hewer Street, W10
My husband Barry Newton lived over John Nodes in Hewer Street in 1950’s. Barry dad Tom worked for John Nodes and raced pigeons in his spare time Tom and his Lena raised 5 sons there before moving to the Southcoast in the mid 70’s due to Tom ill health

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

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Comment
Matthew Moggridge ([email protected])   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 10:38 GMT   

Lord Chatham’s Ride (does it even exist?)
Just to say that I cycled from my home in Sanderstead to Knockholt Pound at the weekend hoping to ride Lord Chatham’s Ride, but could I find it? No. I rode up Chevening Lane, just past the Three Horseshoes pub and when I reached the end of the road there was a gate and a sign reading "Private, No Entry". I assumed this was the back entrance to Chevening House, country retreat of the Foreign Secretary, and that Lord Chatham’s Ride was inside the grounds. At least that’s what I’m assuming as I ended up following a footpath that led me into some woods with loads of rooted pathways, all very annoying. Does Lord Chatham’s Ride exist and if so, can I ride it, or is it within the grounds of Chevening House and, therefore, out of bounds? Here’s an account of my weekend ride with images, see URL below.

Source: No Visible Lycra: Lord Chatham’s ride: a big disappointmen

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norma brown   
Added: 20 Aug 2021 21:12 GMT   

my grandparents lived there as well as 2 further generations
my home

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Ruth   
Added: 6 Aug 2021 13:31 GMT   

Cheltenham Road, SE15
Harris Girls’ Academy, in Homestall Road, just off Cheltenham Road, was formerly Waverley School. Before that it was built as Honor Oak Girls’ Grammar School. It was also the South London Emergency School during WW2,taking girls from various schools in the vicinity, including those returning from being evacuated.

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Acklam Road protests Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway
Adair Road before redevelopment A photo showing Adair Road’s junction with Golborne Gardens in March 1964.
Bridge House Canal side house in Westbourne Park
Graffiti along Acklam Road (1970s) Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway
Harrow Road (1920s) Harrow Road in the 1920s, looking south east towards the Prince of Wales pub and the Emmanuel Church spire.
Orme’s Green Ormes Green was the former name for this part of Westbourne Park.
Portobello Farm Portobello Farm House was approached along Turnpike Lane, sometimes referred to as Green’s Lane, a track leading from Kensington Gravel Pits towards a wooden bridge over the canal.
St Mary’s Harrow Road St Mary’s Harrow Road was built as the infirmary for the Paddington Workhouse.
The Prince of Wales Cinema The Prince of Wales Cinema was located at 331 Harrow Road.
Wedlake Street Baths In a time when most had somewhere to live but few had somewhere to wash at home, public baths were the place to go...
Westbourne Manor The Manor of Westbourne
Weston’s Cider House In 1930 Weston’s opened their first and only cider mill on the Harrow Road.
Windsor Castle The Windsor Castle dates from the 1820s but its main incarnation was as a classic Victorian public house, seminal in 1970s musical history.

NEARBY STREETS
Abinger Mews, W9 Abinger Mews is a street in Maida Vale.
Acklam Road, W10 Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway.
Adair Road, W10 Adair Road is a street on the Kensal Town/North Kensington borders.
Admiral Walk, W9 Admiral Walk is a street in Maida Vale.
Alfred Road, W2 Alfred Road is the last survivor of a set of Victorian streets.
Alperton Street, W10 Alperton Street is the first alphabetically named street in the Queen’s Park Estate, W10.
Amberley Road, W2 Amberley Road was formerly lined by canalside wharves.
Ascot House, W9 Ascot House was built as part of the GLC’s small Windsor estate.
Barnard Lodge, W9 Barnard Lodge is a street in Maida Vale.
Barnsdale Road, W9 Barnsdale Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Blagrove Road, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode.
Brindley Street, W2 Brindley Street was once one of the poorest streets in Paddington.
Burlington Close, W9 Burlington Close is a street in Maida Vale.
Chippenham Mews, W9 Chippenham Mews is a street in Maida Vale.
Chippenham Road, W9 Chippenham Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Cirencester Street, W2 Cirencester Street came about in the 1860s but was shortened when the Warwick Estate was built.
Coomassie Road, W9 Coomassie Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Drayford Close, W9 Drayford Close is a street in Maida Vale.
Edbrooke Road, W9 Edbrooke Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Edenham Mews, W10 Edenham Mews was the site of a youth club and day nursery after the Second World War until demolition.
Edenham Street, W10 Edenham Street was swept away in 1969.
Edenham Way, W10 Edenham Way is a 1970s street.
Elgin Avenue, W9 Elgin Avenue was proposed in an 1827 plan for the area by John Gutch.
Elkstone Road, W10 Elkstone Road replaced Southam Street around 1970.
Elmfield Way, W9 Elmfield Way is a street in Maida Vale.
Fallodon House, W11 Fallodon House was planned in 1973 to replace housing between Tavistock Crescent, Tavistock Road, and St Luke’s Road.
Fermoy Road, W9 Fermoy Road was named in 1883 and partly built up by 1884
First Avenue, W10 First Avenue is street number one in the Queen's Park Estate
Foscote Mews, W9 This is a street in the W9 postcode area
Golborne Gardens, W10 Golborne Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Goldney Road, W9 Goldney Road was built around 1860 on land which was once the property of Westminster Abbey.
Great Western Road, W11 The name of the Great Western Road dates from the 1850s.
Great Western Road, W9 Great Western Road’s northernmost section was created after a bridge was constructed over the canal.
Grittleton Road, W9 Grittleton Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Hampden Street, W2 Hampden Street is a now demolished street.
Harrow Road, W9 Harrow Road is a main road running through Paddington, Willesden and beyond.
Hazlewood Crescent, W10 Hazlewood Crescent, much altered by 1970s redevelopment, is an original road of the area.
Hazlewood Tower, W10 Hazlewood Tower is a skyscraper in North Kensington, London W10.
Hermes Close, W9 Hermes Close is a street in Maida Vale.
Hormead Road, W9 Hormead Road was named in 1885 although its site was still a nursery ground until 1891.
Hunter Lodge, W9 Hunter Lodge is a street in Maida Vale.
James Collins Close, W9 James Collins Close is a street in Maida Vale.
Kensal Place, W10 Kensal Place ran from Southam Street to Kensal Road.
Lanhill Road, W9 Lanhill Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Leamington House, W11 Leamington House was built by 1962.
Lister Lodge, W9 Lister Lodge is a street in Maida Vale.
Lydford Road, W9 Lydford Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Marylands Road, W9 Marylands Road was built by the Neeld family during the 1860s.
Modena Street, W9 Modena Street was swept away in the late 1960s.
Morgan Road, W10 Morgan Road connects Wornington Road and St Ervans Road.
Oakington Road, W9 Oakington Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Orchard Close, W10 Orchard Close is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Pennymore Walk, W9 Pennymore Walk is a close which lies off of Ashmore Road.
Portishead House, W2 Portishead House is part of the Brunel Estate.
Pressland Street, W10 Pressland Street ran from Kensal Road to the canal.
Raddington Road, W10 Raddington Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Second Avenue, W10 Second Avenue is one of the streets of the Queen's Park Estate, W10
Shirland Road, W9 Shirland Road is one of the main thorughfares of Maida Vale.
Southam House, W10 Southam House is situated on Adair Road.
Southam Street, W10 Southam Street was made world-famous in the photographs of Roger Mayne.
St Columbs House, W10 St Columbs House is situated at 9-39 Blagrove Road.
St Ervans Road, W10 St Ervans Road is named after the home town of the Rev. Samuel Walker.
Surrendale Place, W9 Surrendale Place is a street in Maida Vale.
Tavistock Crescent, W11 Tavistock Crescent was where the first Notting Hill Carnival procession began on 18 September 1966.
Thorngate Road, W9 This is a street in the W9 postcode area
Tollbridge Close, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Trellick Tower, W10 Trellick Tower is a 31-storey block of flats designed in the Brutalist style by architect Ernő Goldfinger, completed in 1972.
Walterton Road, W9 Walterton Road was the central road of a suburb which was originally proposed to called St. Peter’s Park.
Warlock Road, W9 Warlock Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Waverley Road, W2 Waverley Road, now gone, lasted just over a hundred years.
Wedlake Street, W10 Wedlake Street arrived as the second wave of building in Kensal Town was completed.
Western Mews, W9 Western Mews is a street in Maida Vale.
Westway, W10 Westway is the A40(M) motorway which runs on an elevated section along the W10/W11 border.
Windsor Gardens, W9 Windsor Gardens is a street in Maida Vale.
Woodfield Crescent, W9 Woodfield Crescent was a former street in London W9.
Woodfield Place, W9 Woodfield Place is a street in Maida Vale.
Woodfield Road, W9 The first section of Woodfield Road seems to date from the 1830s.

NEARBY PUBS
Brittania The Brittania disappeared as Trellick Tower began to take shape.
Earl of Warwick The Earl of Warwick stood at 36 Golborne Road.
Great Western The Great Western was a pub in Hampden Street.
Kensal Community Centre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Metropolitan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sporting Club De Londres This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Weston’s Cider House In 1930 Weston’s opened their first and only cider mill on the Harrow Road.
Windsor Castle The Windsor Castle dates from the 1820s but its main incarnation was as a classic Victorian public house, seminal in 1970s musical history.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Kensington Park Hotel
TUM image id: 1453375720
Licence: CC BY 2.0
201311211613
TUM image id: 1453376699
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Bosworth Road, W10
TUM image id: 1453369722
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Caird Street street sign.
TUM image id: 1456818442
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Munro Mews, W10
TUM image id: 1453906723
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Arundel Gardens
Credit: Barbara Avis
TUM image id: 1453911014
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The Tabernacle is a Grade II*-listed building in Powis Square, W11 built in 1887 as a church. Photographed here in 2010.
Credit: Asteuartw
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To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Duke of Cornwall, Ledbury Road W11, around 1990. Now The Ledbury restaurant, holder of 2 Michelin Stars as of 2014.
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The corner of Caird Street with Lancefield Street.
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201311211613
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Caird Street street sign.
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Great Western Road (1959)
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Portobello Road, W11
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Powis Terrace aka Hedgegate Court from Powis Square/Talbot Road (1900s). A.k.a. the "My Beautiful Laundrette" corner.
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Talbot Road from the east corner of Powis Square 1900s featuring the site of Fullerton's tailor's/blues and the Globe bar.
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Tavistock Crescent, W11
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