Thorney Crescent, SW11

Road in/near Battersea

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Road · Battersea · SW11 ·
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2000

Thorney Crescent is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.

A lot of the street information research on this website is academic in nature - from university research, the Survey of London, British History Online, borough conservation areas and more. Occasionally, the Hive Mind comes up trumps - these derivations come from discoveries on the Wikipedia made during 2019 which is feeding into the project.

If we find any derivations dubious here, we remove them. With that proviso, the TUM project provides them here for your enjoyment...

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Dacre Street Westminster Lady Anne Dacre Endowed (to charitable trust) Emmanuel Almshouses near-adjoining. Although now demolished, their legacy continues in the three schools, Westminster City School, Grey Coat Hospital and Emanuel School. Or after Joan Dacre, 7th Baroness Dacre, who lived in a house on this site in the 15th century [Westminster]
Dallington Street – after Robert Dallington, master of the Charterhouse in the 1620s [Clerkenwell]
Dane Street – from the St Clement Danes church on Aldwych, who own land in the area [Holborn]
Dansey Place – unknown; formerly named George Yard, after a pub adjacent called the George and Dragon [Chinatown]
Dante Place – after the Italian poet Dante Alighieri [Lambeth]
Dante Road – after the Italian poet Dante Alighieri [Lambeth]
Danvers Street SW3 - Sir John Danvers, who died in 1655 and first taught us the way of Italian gardens, had his mansion Danvers House which spread from the river to the Kings Road. Sir John served at the Court of Charles I, although afterwards fought for Parliament and signed King Charles's death warrant in 1649. Danvers Street was built on the site of his garden.
D'Arblay Street – after the author Frances Burney, Madame D’Arblay, who lived on Poland Street as a girl [Soho]
Dark House Walk – after a former inn here called the Darkhouse; it was formerly Dark House Lane, and prior to that Dark Lane [City of London]
Dartmouth Street – after William Legge, 1st Earl of Dartmouth, Lord Privy Seal in the 1710s and local resident [Westminster]
David Mews – after David Porter, builder of the nearby Montagu Square [Marylebone]
Davies Mews – after Mary Davies, heiress to Hugh Audley, who married Sir Thomas Grosvenor, thereby letting the local land fall into the Grosvenors' ownership [Mayfair]
Davies Street – after Mary Davies, heiress to Hugh Audley, who married Sir Thomas Grosvenor, thereby letting the local land fall into the Grosvenors' ownership [Mayfair]
Dawes Street Southwark James Arthur Dawes First Mayor of Metropolitan Borough of Southwark.
De Walden Street – after Baroness Howard de Walden, local landowner [Marylebone]
Dean Bradley Street Westminster George Granville Bradley Dean of Westminster Abbey from 1881 to 1902.
Dean Farrar Street – after Frederick William Farrar, rector of St Margaret's, Westminster and a canon at Westminster in the late 19th century [Westminster]
Dean Ryle Street – after Sir Herbert Edward Ryle, Dean of Westminster 1911-25 [Westminster]
Dean Stanley Street – after Richard Chenevix Trench, Dean of Westminster 1856-64 [Westminster]
Dean Street – unknown; possibly by connection with Old Compton Street, named for Henry Compton, Bishop of London in the 1670s, who was also Dean of the Chapel Royal [Soho]
Dean Trench Street – after Arthur Penrhyn Stanley, Dean of Westminster 1864-81 [Westminster]
Dean’s Court – after the Dean of St Paul’s [City of London]
Dean’s Mews – thought to be for a Catholic college formerly located here [Marylebone]
Dean’s Yard – location of the Dean of Westminster’s house [Westminster]
Deanery Mews – this land was owned by Westminster Abbey in the 18th century; it was formerly known as Dean and Chapter Street [Mayfair]
Deanery Street – this land was owned by Westminster Abbey in the 18th century; it was formerly known as Dean and Chapter Street [Mayfair]
Defoe Place – after the author Daniel Defoe [City of London]
Defoe Road Hackney Daniel Defoe Well-known author of Robinson Crusoe, who lived in a house at the north end of the road near its junction with Stoke Newington Church Street
Denbigh Place – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one [Victoria]
Denbigh Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one [Victoria]
Denman Road Southwark Thomas Denman, 1st Baron Denman Lord Chief Justice between 1832 and 1850. One of several streets on the estate named after lawyers.
Denman Street – after Thomas Denman, 1st Baron Denman, 19th century attorney general, who was born here; it was formerly known Queen Street, in honour of Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II [Soho]
Denmark Place – after Prince George of Denmark, husband of Queen Anne [St Gile's]
Denmark Street – after Prince George of Denmark, husband of Queen Anne [St Gile's]
Denny Crescent – after Rev. Edward Denny, former vicar of St Peter's Church, Vauxhall [Lambeth]
Denny Street – after Rev. Edward Denny, former vicar of St Peter's Church, Vauxhall [Lambeth]
Derby Gate – after William, Lord Derby, who built a mansion on this site in the early 17th century [Westminster]
Derby Street – after Derbyshire, home county of local landowners the Curzon family [Mayfair]
Derry Street Kensington and Chelsea Charles Derry With Joseph Toms, founded the former shop of Derry & Toms, near the north end of the street.
Devereux Court – from the Devereaux family, earls of Essex, who occupied Essex House on this site in Tudor times [Holborn]
Devonshire Close – after local landowner the Cavendish family, who had a branch which became the dukes of Devonshire [Marylebone]
Devonshire Gardens, Hounslow Dukes of Devonshire Owners of Chiswick House, on whose large estate the roads were built. Re-built in 1811 by the 6th Duke)
Devonshire Mews North, Devonshire Mews South, Devonshire Mews West, Devonshire Place, Devonshire Place Mews, Devonshire Row Mews and Devonshire Street – after local landowner the Cavendish family, who had a branch which became the dukes of Devonshire [Marylebone]
Devonshire Road, Devonshire Place, Devonshire Street, Hounslow Dukes of Devonshire Owners of Chiswick House, on whose large estate the roads were built. Re-built in 1811 by the 6th Duke)
Devonshire Row – after the Cavendish family, Dukes of Devonshire, who owed a house near here in the 1600s [City of London]
Devonshire Square – after the Cavendish family, Dukes of Devonshire, who owed a house near here in the 1600s [City of London]
Diadem Court – unknown, though possibly from a former inn; formerly Crown Court [Soho]
Dickens Mews – presumably after Victorian author Charles Dickens [Farringdon]
Dickens Square – after Charles Dickens, who spent part of his childhood here [Southwark]
Dingley Place – after Charles Dingley, who instigated the construction of City Road in 1756 [Finsbury]
Dingley Road – after Charles Dingley, who instigated the construction of City Road in 1756 [Finsbury]
Distaff Lane – formerly Little Distaff Lane, as it lay off the main Distaff Lane (now absorbed into Cannon Street); in Medieval times the area was home to a distaff industry [City of London]
Doby Court – thought to be after a local landowner; prior to 1800 called Maidenhead Court [City of London]
Doctor Johnson Avenue Wandsworth Samuel Johnson Johnson lived at Streatham Place, the villa of Henry and Hester Thrale in Streatham Park, immediately south-east of the Avenue, from 1766 to 1782.
Dolben Street – after John Dolben, 17th century archbishop; it was formerly George Street [Southwark]
Dollis Hill Road NW2 - Named after the Dollis Brook that runs from Arkley and joins up with the Mutton Brook to form the River Brent. The name Dollis is likely derived from the English word 'dole', meaning the shares of land in the common field.
Dolphin Square – after the 'dolphin' formerly located here; it was a pump for drawing out river water [Victoria]
Dombey Street – named in 1936 after local resident Charles Dickens’s book Dombey and Son; it was formerly East Street, in relation to the nearby New North Street [Bloomsbury]
Domingo Street – the streets here were built by a timber merchant circa 1810 who named them after trade-related activities; Domingo is an alternative name for Hispaniola, a source of mahogany [Finsbury]
Dorando Close Hammersmith and Fulham Dorando Pietri Famed for finishing first in the marathon 1908 London summer Olympics, but being disqualified for receiving assistance.
Doric Way – after the Euston Doric Arch, demolished in 1961 [Somers Town]
Dorrington Street – corruption of ‘Doddington’, from Anne Doddington, wife of Robert Grenville who owned a house near here in the 17th century [Hatton Garden]
Dorrit Street – after the novel Little Dorrit by Charles Dickens, by association with Dickens Square [Southwark]
Dorset Buildings – Salisbury Court, London home of the bishops of Salisbury, formerly stood near here; after the Dissolution of the Monasteries it passed to Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset [City of London]
Dorset Close and Dorset Square – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; this street is named for Dorset where they owned land [Lisson Grove]
Dorset Mews – presumably after the Dorset landholding of the Grosvenor family [Belgravia]
Dorset Rise – Salisbury Court, London home of the bishops of Salisbury, formerly stood near here; after the Dissolution of the Monasteries it passed to Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset [City of London]
Dorset Street – after Dorset, where the local Portman family owned much land [Marylebone]
Doughty Mews – after the Doughty family, local landowners in the 18th century [Bloomsbury]
Doughty Street Camden Henry Doughty Landlord of the area when the street was built in 1792-1810
Douglas Street - after William Douglas, Canon at Westminster [Westminster]
Dover Street – after Henry Jermyn, 1st Baron Dover, local leaseholder in the late 17th century [Mayfair]
Dover Yard – after Henry Jermyn, 1st Baron Dover, local leaseholder in the late 17th century [Mayfair]
Dowding Road, Uxbridge Street built near the site of the former RAF Uxbridge, and named after an air marshal in the Second World War. Hugh Dowding was leader of the RAF during the Battle of Britain
Dowgate Hill – after a former watergate leading to the Thames here; it was formerly Duuegate, Old English for ‘dove’ (possibly a personal name), or possibly simply from the word 'down' [City of London]
Down Street – after John Downes, local bricklayer in the 18th century [Mayfair]
Down Street Mews – after John Downes, local bricklayer in the 18th century [Mayfair]
Downing Street Westminster Sir George Downing, 1st Baronet Built by and named after Downing
D'Oyley Street – after Sarah D’Oyley, who inherited land here from her grandfather Hans Sloane [Belgravia]
Drake Street – thought to be after an early 18th century builder of this name [Holborn]
Drapers Gardens – after the adjacent Worshipful Company of Drapers building [City of London]
Druid Street – possibly after a former inn here with ‘Druid’ in its name [Southwark]
Drummond Crescent - part of the Duke of Grafton's FitzRoy Estate, named after Lady Caroline Drummond, great grand-daughter of Charles FitzRoy, 2nd Duke of Grafton [Somers Town]
Drummond Street – after Lady Caroline Drummond, a member of the Duke of Grafton's family [Regent’s Park]
Drury Lane – and old street, renamed in honour of Sir William (or Robert) Drury in the 16th century who owned a house at the southern end of the street [Covent Garden]
Drury Road, Harrow Part of a cluster of streets named after teachers and headmasters of Harrow School: Joseph Drury (1785–1805).
Dryden Street – after the 17th century poet John Dryden, who lives nearby and whose poem-dramas were often performed in the theatres nearby [Covent Garden]
Du Cane Road, East Acton - Edmund Du Cane, designed the Wormwood Scrubs Prison in the fields of Wormholt Scrubs, 'holt' meaning woods. The road leading to the prison takes Edmund's name.
Duchess Mews – by association with the dukes and duchesses of Portland, local landowners, possibly specifically Dorothy Duchess of Portland [Marylebone]
Duchess of Bedford's Walk Kensington and Chelsea Lady Georgiana Russell, wife of John Russell, 6th Duke of Bedford Lived at Argyll Lodge, a former house on Campden Hill, near the location of the road.
Duchess Street – by association with the dukes and duchesses of Portland, local landowners, possibly specifically Dorothy Duchess of Portland [Marylebone]
Duchy Place - as it formed part of the manor of Kennington, which belonged to the Duchy of Cornwall [Waterloo]
Duchy Street - as it formed part of the manor of Kennington, which belonged to the Duchy of Cornwall [Waterloo]
Dufferin Avenue – thought to be named after a trustee of the Peabody Donation Fund, who redeveloped this former slum area in the 1880s [Finsbury]
Dufferin Court – thought to be named after a trustee of the Peabody Donation Fund, who redeveloped this former slum area in the 1880s [Finsbury]
Dufour's Place – from the early 18th century street builder Paul Dufour [Soho]
Duke Humphrey Road Greenwich / Lewisham Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester The duke enclosed nearby Greenwich Park. A continuation of the road northwards leads to the Royal Observatory, Greenwich built on the site of Duke Humphrey's Tower
Duke of Wellington Place - after the adjacent Apsley House, originally built for Henry Bathurst, 2nd Earl Bathurst (Lord Apsley), later the residence of the Dukes of Wellington [Westminster]
Duke Road Hounslow Dukes of Devonshire Owners of Chiswick House, on whose large estate the roads were built. Re-built in 1811 by the 6th Duke)
Duke Street – it is unknown precisely which duke, if any, this street commemorates [Marylebone]
Duke Street – it is unknown precisely which duke, if any, this street commemorates [Mayfair]
Duke Street Hill – named for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, 19th century military figure [Southwark]
Duke Street, St James's and Duke of York Street – named after James II, Duke of York when the street was built and brother to Charles II, king at the time [St James's]
Duke Yard – it is unknown precisely which duke, if any, this street commemorates [Mayfair]
Duke’s Mews – it is unknown precisely which duke, if any, this street commemorates [Marylebone]
Duke's Avenue Harrow James Brydges, 1st Duke of Chandos Lived at Canons Park, to the north of the road buried in the parish at St Lawrence's church, Whitchurch, Little Stanmore.
Duke's Avenue Hounslow Dukes of Devonshire Owners of Chiswick House, on whose large estate the roads were built. Re-built in 1811 by the 6th Duke)
Dukes Place – after Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk, who inherited a house near here from his uncle Thomas Audley, who had gained the land following the Dissolution of the Monasteries. He was beheaded in 1572. [City of London]
Dukes Road – after the dukes of Bedford, local landowners [Bloomsbury]
Duncannon Street – after John Ponsonby, 5th Earl of Bessborough and later Baron Duncannon of Bessborough, who built the street with George Agar in the 1830s [Covent Garden]
Dunraven Street – after Windham Thomas Wyndham-Quin, 4th Earl of Dunraven and Mount-Earl, politician and soldier who lived near here [Mayfair]
Dunstable Mews – unknown; prior to 1935 it was Upper Wimpole Mews [Marylebone]
Dunster Court – corruption of St Dunstan’s Court, as it lay in the parish of St Dunstan-in-the-East [City of London]
Durham House Street – this was the former site of a palace belonging to the bishops of Durham in Medieval times [Strand]
Durweston Street – after Durweston, Dorset, where the local Portman family owned land [Marylebone]
Dyer’s Buildings – after almshouses owned by the Worshipful Company of Dyers formerly located here [City of London]
Dyott Street – after either Simon Dyott, local resident in the 17th century or Jane Dyott, granddaughter or local landowner Henry Bainbridge [Bloomsbury]
Eagle Court – after Eagle, Lincolnshire; the Order of Knights of St John owned land in this village and the Bailiff of Eagle owned a house near here [Farringdon]
Eagle Street – named after a local inn here in the 18th century [Holborn]
Earlham Street – formerly two streets – Great and Little Earl Street, later renamed to avoid confusion with various other Earl Streets; which earl it commemorated is unknown [Covent Garden]
Earlstoke Street – corruption of Erlestoke: local landowner Charles Compton, 1st Marquess of Northampton married in 1787 Maria Smith, daughter of Joshua Smith MP, of Erlestoke Park, Wiltshire [Clerkenwell]
Earnshaw Street – after Thomas Earnshaw, noted watchmaker of the 18th-19th century, who worked near here [St Gile's]
Easleys Mews – after Abraham Easley, 18th century landowner [Marylebone]
East Harding Street – after local 16th century property owner Agnes Harding, who bequeathed the surrounding area to the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths for the upkeep of widows [City of London]
East Poultry Avenue – after the meat trade here at Smithfield Market [City of London]
Eastcastle Street – after the former nearby pub The Castle; it was formerly Little Castle Street [Fitzrovia]
Eastcheap – as it was the eastern end of the former Cheapside market [City of London]
Easton Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, who owned property in Easton Maudit, Northamptonshire [Clerkenwell]
Eaton Close - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), whose family seat is Eaton Hall, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Eaton Lane – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; the family owned land in Eaton, Cheshire [Victoria]
Eaton Mews North - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), whose family seat is Eaton Hall, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Eaton Mews South - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), whose family seat is Eaton Hall, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Eaton Mews West - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), whose family seat is Eaton Hall, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Eaton Place SW1 - Eaton Hall in Cheshire is the principal seat of the Duke of Westminster, owner of these streets and land in Westminster.
Eaton Row - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), whose family seat is Eaton Hall, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Eaton Square SW1 - Eaton Hall in Cheshire is the principal seat of the Duke of Westminster, owner of these streets and land in Westminster.
Eaton Terrace - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), whose family seat is Eaton Hall, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Eaton Terrace Mews, South Eaton Place and West Eaton Place - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), whose family seat is Eaton Hall, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Ebury Bridge – as this area was formerly part of the manor of Ebury, thought to have originated as a Latinisation of the Anglo-Saxon toponym ‘eyai’, which means ‘island’ [19] in reference to a marsh that once dominated the area; the bridge here formerly stood over a small stream [Victoria]
Ebury Bridge Road – this area was formerly part of the manor of Ebury [Belgravia]
Ebury Mews – this area was formerly part of the manor of Ebury [Belgravia]
Ebury Mews East – this area was formerly part of the manor of Ebury [Belgravia]
Ebury Square – this area was formerly part of the manor of Ebury [Belgravia]
Ebury Street – this area was formerly part of the manor of Ebury [Belgravia]
Eccleston Mews - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Eccleston, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Eccleston Place - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Eccleston, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Eccleston Square Mews – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; they owned land in Eccleston, Cheshire [Victoria]
Eccleston Square SW1 - Derives its name from Eccleston in Cheshire, where the Grosvenor family own property.
Eccleston Street SW1 - Derives its name from Eccleston in Cheshire, where the Grosvenor family own property.
Edgware Road – as it leads to Edgware, Middlesex [Lisson Grove]
Edgware Road NW2/ N,W9/ W2 - This is the old Roman Road of Watling Street that ran from Dover to Chester.
Edward Mews - after Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Edwardes Square W8 - Derived its name from William Edwardes, 2nd Lord Kensington that was on part of his Holland House Estate.
Edwards Mews – after Edward Gray, local 18th century leaseholder [Marylebone]
Eldon Street – after John Scott, 1st Earl of Eldon, Lord Chancellor in the early 19th century, or a tavern named after him [City of London]
Elephant and Castle - derived from a coaching inn of this name [Lambeth]
Elgin Road, Croydon Group of five roads built on the site of the East India Company Military Seminary by the British Land Company, and named after prominent figures in the history of British India. Elgin was Governor-General of India 1862-3.
Elizabeth Bridge – after Lady Elizabeth Leveson-Gower, wife of Richard Grosvenor, 2nd Marquess of Westminster [Victoria]
Elizabeth Close Westminster Elizabeth Barrett Browning Poet who lived in Little Venice, near the site of the road. Elizabeth was one of the most prominent English poets of the Victorian era.
Elizabeth Street – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave); Elizabeth Leveson-Gower was the wife of Richard Grosvenor, 2nd Marquess of Westminster [Belgravia]
Elizabeth Way Hounslow Elizabeth I of England. Elizabeth spent part of her childhood at Hanworth Manor close nearby and sometimes stayed there during her reign.
Ellis Street – after Anne Ellis, who inherited land here from her grandfather Hans Sloane [Belgravia]
Elm Court – after the elm trees in the Temple Gardens [City of London]
Elm Street – possibly for the former elm tress located here [Clerkenwell]
Ely Court – after the Bishops of Ely, Cambridgeshire who owned much of this area prior to 1659 [Hatton Garden]
Ely Place – after the Bishops of Ely, Cambridgeshire who owned much of this area prior to 1659 [Hatton Garden]
Embankment Place – after the Thames Embankment, built in the Victorian era [Strand]
Emerald Court – Named in connection with nearby Emerald Street [Bloomsbury]
Emerald Street – Green Street prior to 1885, changed to avoid confusion with numerous other streets of that name [Bloomsbury]
Emerson Street – after Thomas Emerson, 15th century local benefactor [Southwark]
Emery Hill Street – after Emery Hill, benefactor to local charities [Westminster]
Emery Street – after the nearby Wellington Mills, which manufactured emery paper in the 19th century; prior to 1893 it was Short Street [Waterloo]
Empress Drive Bromley Empress Eugénie of France Lived in exile at nearby Camden Place from 1871 to 1881.
Endell Street – named after the rector of St Giles, James Endell Tyler in 1846 [Covent Garden]
Endsleigh Gardens – after Endsleigh, a property in Tavistock, Devon owned by the dukes of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Endsleigh Place – after Endsleigh, a property in Tavistock, Devon owned by the dukes of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Endsleigh Street – after Endsleigh, a property in Tavistock, Devon owned by the dukes of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Enford Street – after Enford, Dorset, where the local Portman family owned land; the street was formerly known as Circus Street [Marylebone]
English Grounds – thought to be after the English workers here during the railway boom, who were kept separate from the Irish ones nearby at Irish Grounds [Southwark]
Erasmus Street – after Dutch scholar Desiderius Erasmus, who moved to London in 1498 [Westminster]
Errol Street – thought to be named after a trustee of the Peabody Donation Fund, who redeveloped this former slum area in the 1880s [Finsbury]
Essex Court – presumably after the earls of Essex, who owned a townhouse near here (hence the nearby Essex Street) [City of London]
Essex Road N1 - Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, had a country house here in the sixteenth century where he often entertained Queen Elizabeth I. The Old Queens Head pub was built on the site of his old house.
Essex Street and Little Essex Street – former site of a townhouse belonging to the earls of Essex [Holborn]
Euston Grove – after the earl of Euston, son of the duke of Grafton, local landowners when the road was built in the 1760s [Regent’s Park]
Euston Road – developed in 1756 by the 2nd Duke of Grafton on land belonging to the FitzRoy Estate, named after Euston Hall, the Graftons' family home [Somers Town]
Euston Square – after the earl of Euston, son of the duke of Grafton, local landowners when the road was built in the 1760s [Regent’s Park]
Euston Station Colonnade – after the earl of Euston, son of the duke of Grafton, local landowners when the road was built in the 1760s [Regent’s Park]
Euston Street – after the earl of Euston, son of the duke of Grafton, local landowners when the road was built in the 1760s [Regent’s Park]
Euston Underpass – after the earl of Euston, son of the duke of Grafton, local landowners when the road was built in the 1760s [Regent’s Park]
Evelyn Street Lewisham John Evelyn English writer and essayist who lived at Sayes Court, a former house in Deptford near the street.
Evelyn Yard – built by the local Evelyn family in the 18th century [Fitzrovia]
Everard Avenue Bromley Everard Hambro Banker who lived at Hayes Place, a former house on whose estate the road was later built.
Eversholt Street –after the Dukes of Bedford, whose seat was at Woburn Abbey near Eversholt, Bedfordshire [Regent’s Park]
Excel Court - after Excel House, 1930s office block located here [Soho]
Exchange Court – opened in the mid-17th century opposite the New Exchange (covered row of shops) [Covent Garden]
Exchange Street – after the former Clerkenwell Telephone Exchange [Finsbury]
Exeter Street – site of a house belonging to William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, whose son later became earl of Exeter; laid out in 1676 following the demolition of the house [Covent Garden]
Exmouth Market EC1 - Built on land formerly known as Spa Fields. The name celebrates Admiral Edward Pellew, 1st Viscount Exmouth, (1757-1833) who distinguished himself at the battle of Lake Champlain.
Exmouth Mews – presumably by relation to Exmouth Street, now Starcross Street [Regent’s Park]
Eyre Street Hill – unknown; formerly called Little Bath Street [Clerkenwell]
Fair Street – after the former Horselydown Fair held here [Southwark]
Falcon Court – after a former inn or shop of this name [City of London]
Falconberg Mews – after Falconberg House (demolished 1924) the former home of Thomas Belasyse, 1st Viscount Fauconberg in the 17th century [Soho]
Fann Street – thought to be named after a local property owner or tradesman of this name [City of London]
Fareham Street – built in the early 18th century as Titchfield Street, after the Duke of Portland, Marquis of Titchfield (in Hampshire); the street was renamed in 1950 after the neighbouring town of Fareham [Soho]
Farm Street – this street was formerly part of Hay Hill farm [Mayfair]
Farringdon Lane – from Sir William or Nicholas de Farnedon/Faringdon, local sheriffs or aldermen in the 13th century [Clerkenwell]
Farringdon Road – from Sir William or Nicholas de Farnedon/Faringdon, local sheriffs or aldermen in the 13th century [Clerkenwell]
Farringdon Road – from Sir William or Nicholas de Farnedon/Faringdon, local sheriffs or aldermen in the 13th century [Farringdon]
Farringdon Road – from Sir William or Nicholas de Farnedon/Faringdon, local sheriffs or aldermen in the 13th century [Hatton Garden]
Farringdon Street – from Sir William or Nicholas de Farnedon/Faringdon, local sheriffs or aldermen in the 13th century [City of London]
Fauconberg Road Hounslow Thomas Belasyse, 1st Earl of Fauconberg Lived at Sutton Court, a former house that stood at the east end of the road. Chiswick.
Featherstone Street – after the Featherstone family, local landowners after Matthew Featherstone bought land here in 1732 [Finsbury]
Fen Court – after a fen which was formerly located near here, and possibly the former St Gabriel Fenchurch [City of London]
Fenchurch Avenue – after a fen which was formerly located near here, and possibly the former St Gabriel Fenchurch [City of London]
Fenchurch Buildings – after a fen which was formerly located near here, and possibly the former St Gabriel Fenchurch [City of London]
Fenchurch Place – after a fen which was formerly located near here, and possibly the former St Gabriel Fenchurch [City of London]
Fenchurch Street – after a fen (peat marsh) which was formerly located near here, and possibly the former St Gabriel Fenchurch [City of London]
Fentiman Road – after local mid-19th century developer John Fentiman [Vauxhall]
Fernsbury Street – named in 1912 after an early variant of ‘Finsbury’, former name for this area [Clerkenwell]
Fetter Lane – formerly Fewter Lane, a Medieval term for an idler, [196] [201] stemming originally from the Old French 'faitour' (lawyer) [City of London]
Fetter Lane EC1 - Corrupted from Fewtar’s or Fautre that was the name for a spear rest, that was made here or closes by.
Field Street – built over Battle Bridge Field, or possibly after Peter Field, early 19th century builder [Clerkenwell]
Finch Lane – after Robert Fink (some sources: Aelfwin Finnk), who paid for the rebuilding of the former St Benet Fink Church in the 13th century; the church was destroyed in the 1666 Fire, and its replacement demolished in the 1840s [City of London]
Finsbury Avenue – after a Saxon burgh (settlement) owned by someone called Finn [City of London]
Finsbury Avenue Square – after a Saxon burgh (settlement) owned by someone called Finn [City of London]
Finsbury Circus – after a Saxon burgh (settlement) owned by someone called Finn [City of London]
Finsbury Pavement EC2 - Named after the first pavement of firm ground in the marshy Moorfields.
Finsbury Square – after a Saxon burgh (settlement) owned by someone called Finn [Finsbury]
Finsbury Street – after a Saxon burgh (settlement) owned by someone called Finn [Finsbury]
Fish Street Hill – after the former local fish trade here, centred on Billingsgate Fish Market [City of London]
Fish Wharf – after the former local fish trade here, centred on Billingsgate Fish Market [City of London]
Fisher Street – after Thomas Fisher, a local 16th century landowner [Holborn]
Fisherton Street – Broadley Street near here was formerly Earl Street, and the surrounding streets were given earldom-related names in the early 19th century; this was named after Fisherton, Salisbury, Wiltshire, by association with the Earls of Salisbury [Lisson Grove]
Fishmongers Hall Wharf – after the adjacent Fishmongers' Hall [City of London]
Fitzalan Street - after Thomas Arundel (FitzAlan), Archbishop of Canterbury in the early 15th century, by connection with the nearby Lambeth Palace [Lambeth]
Fitzhardinge Street – after Viscount Fitzhardinge, relative of Henry William Berkeley, local landowner [Marylebone]
Fitzmaurice Place – after John FitzMaurice, father of William Petty, 1st Marquess of Lansdowne who lived near here in the 18th century [Mayfair]
Fitzroy Court, Fitzroy Mews, Fitzroy Square and Fitzroy Street – after the Fitzroy family, dukes of Grafton, who owned much of this land [Fitzrovia]
Fitzroy Square Camden Charles FitzRoy, 2nd Duke of Grafton The square takes its name from the family name of Charles FitzRoy, 2nd Duke of Grafton, into whose ownership the land passed through his marriage. His descendant Charles FitzRoy, 1st Baron Southampton developed the area during the late 18th and early 19th century.
Flaxman Court – after the John Flaxman, 18th – 19th century sculptor who lived on Wardour Street [Soho]
Flaxman Terrace – after the John Flaxman, 18th–19th century sculptor who is buried at the nearby St Pancras Old Church [Bloomsbury]
Fleet Place – after the now covered river Fleet which flowed near here [City of London]
Fleet Square – presumably as the river Fleet flowed near here [Clerkenwell]
Fleet Street – after the now covered river Fleet which flowed near here [City of London]
Flitcroft Street – after Henry Flitcroft, architect of St Giles in the Fields church [St Gile's]
Floral Street – renamed after the Floral Hall in 1895, both in reference to Covent Garden’s flower markets. The street was formerly Hart Street, from the 16th century White Hart Inn [Covent Garden]
Flowers Close Brent Tommy Flowers Flowers was the designer of the Colossus computer and worked at the Post Office Research Station adjacent to the road.
Foley Street – after Lord Foley, local resident of the 18th-19th centuries [Fitzrovia]
Fore Street – named after its location in front of the City walls [City of London]
Fore Street Avenue – named after its location in front of the City walls [City of London]
Forset Street – after Edward Forset (or Forsett), surveyor with the department of works, who owned land here in the 16th – 17th century [Marylebone]
Fort Street – after the former armoury and artillery grounds located near here [City of London]
Fortune Street – after the Fortune Playhouse, which formerly stood here on the junction with Golden Lane; it was closed in 1648 [Finsbury]
Foster Lane – corruption of Vedast, after the adjacent St Vedast Church [City of London]
Foubert’s Place – after Major Henry Foubert, who established a military riding school nearby in the 18th century [Soho]
Founders’ Court – after the Worshipful Company of Founders, who were formerly based here [City of London]
Fountain Court – after the 17th century fountain located here [City of London]
Fournier Street Tower Hamlets George Fournier One of the Huguenot refugees who settled in the area near the street in the 18th century.
Fox and Knot Street – after the Fox and Knot tavern of the 18th century [Farringdon]
Frampton Street – after the sculptor and local resident George Frampton [Lisson Grove]
Francis Street – after Francis Wilcox, local 19th century landowner; formerly Francis Place [Westminster]
Frederick Street – after local landowners the Barons Calthorpe, the 4th and 5th of whom were called Frederick [Clerkenwell]
Frederick’s Place – after John Frederick, Lord Mayor of London in 1661 [City of London]
French Ordinary Court – former site of an ‘ordinary’ (cheap eating place) for the local French community in the 17th century [City of London]
Freston Road, W11 Edward Latymer Clerk at the Court of Wards and Liveries who bequeathed the land on which Latimer Road was later built to help fund Latymer Upper School, which he founded. Originally Latimer Road ran past the tube station of the same name; but after it was split by the Westway flyover, the south part was renamed Freston Road after the village in Suffolk associated with Latymer.
Friar Street – after the former Dominican friary that stood here 1276–1538 [City of London]
Friday Street – after the former local fish trade here, with reference to the popularity of fish on this day owing to the Catholic Friday Fast; the street formerly extended all the way to Cheapside [City of London]
Friend Street – after George Friend, local scarlet-dyer who founded a free clinic nearby in 1780 [Clerkenwell]
Frith Street – after Robert Frith, late 17th century property developer in the area who built the street [Soho]
Frobisher Crescent – after the explorer Martin Frobisher, who is buried in the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate [City of London]
Fruiterers Passage – after the Worshipful Company of Fruiterers, formerly based here [City of London]
Fulwood Place – after Sir George Fulwood, 16th century member of Gray's Inn [Holborn]
Furnival Street – after the nearby Furnival’s Inn, owned by Sir Richard Furnival in the late 1500s [City of London]
Furnival’s Inn EC1 - Furnival’s Inn, where Dickens later wrote Pickwick Papers, took its name from Sir Richard Furnival, who possessed two Messuages and 13 shops there during the reign of Richard II. The Prudential Assurance Company the red brick building at Holborn Bars is sprawled over what was once Furnival's Inn, the name only survives in the little street opposite.
Fye Foot Lane – corruption of ‘five foot’, after its original breadth; formerly Finamour Lane, after an individual with this surname [City of London]
Fynes Street – after Charles John Fynes Clinton, who was educated at Westminster School [Westminster]


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Some street name derivations – The Underground Map   

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Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

Reply
Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

Reply
Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply
Lived here
David James Bloomfield   
Added: 13 Jul 2021 11:54 GMT   

Hurstway Street, W10
Jimmy Bloomfield who played for Arsenal in the 1950s was brought up on this street. He was a QPR supporter as a child, as many locals would be at the time, as a teen he was rejected by them as being too small. They’d made a mistake

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Comment
Added: 6 Jul 2021 05:38 GMT   

Wren Road in the 1950s and 60s
Living in Grove Lane I knew Wren Road; my grandfather’s bank, Lloyds, was on the corner; the Scout District had their office in the Congregational Church and the entrance to the back of the Police station with the stables and horses was off it. Now very changed - smile.

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fariba   
Added: 28 Jun 2021 00:48 GMT   

Tower Bridge Business Complex, S
need for my coursework

Source: university

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Lived here
Kim Johnson   
Added: 24 Jun 2021 19:17 GMT   

Limehouse Causeway (1908)
My great grandparents were the first to live in 15 Tomlins Terrace, then my grandparents and parents after marriage. I spent the first two years of my life there. My nan and her family lived at number 13 Tomlins Terrace. My maternal grandmother lived in Maroon house, Blount Street with my uncle. Nan, my mum and her brothers were bombed out three times during the war.

Reply
Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 8 Jun 2021 08:08 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Lived here #40 1942-1967

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Cremorne Gardens Cremorne Gardens, with a vestige existing today, was in its prime between 1846 and 1877.
The Prince Albert Originally called the Albert Tavern, the Prince Albert public house is a three storey building dating from 1866-68.

NEARBY STREETS
Albany Mansions, SW11 Albany Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Albion Riverside Building, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Albion Riverside, SW11 Albion Riverside is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Althorpe Mews, SW11 Althorpe Mews is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Anhalt Road, SW11 Anhalt Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Battersea Bridge Road, SW11 The laying out of Battersea Bridge Road took place in several phases between the 1770s and 1850s.
Battersea Bridge, SW11 Battersea Bridge connects Battersea and Chelsea with the first bridge dating from 1771.
Battersea Bridge, SW3 Battersea Bridge, a five-span arch bridge with cast-iron girders and granite piers links Battersea south of the River Thames with Chelsea to the north.
Battersea Church Road, SW11 Battersea Church Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Battersea Square, SW11 Battersea Square is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Blantyre Street, SW10 Blantyre Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Blomfield Court, SW11 Blomfield Court is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Bolingbroke Walk, SW11 Bolingbroke Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Chelsea Wharf, SW10 Chelsea Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Cheyne Walk, SW10 Cheyne Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Condray Place, SW11 Condray Place is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Cotswold Mews, SW11 Cotswold Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Cremorne Road, SW10 Cremorne Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Dartrey Tower, SW10 Dartrey Tower is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Elcho Street, SW11 Elcho Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Ethelburga Street, SW11 Ethelburga Street was named after Saint Æthelburh (Ethelburga), founder and first Abbess of Barking.
Granfield Street, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Great Eastern Wharf, SW11 Great Eastern Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Greaves Tower, SW10 Greaves Tower is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Henty Close, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Hester Road, SW11 Hester Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Howie Street, SW11 Howie Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Hyde Lane, SW11 Hyde Lane is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Juer Street, SW11 Juer Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
King’s Road, SW10 This is a street in the SW10 postcode area
Kingswater Place, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Langton Street, SW10 Langton Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Lots Road, SW10 Lots Road, older than the surrounding streets, was once Pooles Lane which was a track leading to Chelsea Farm.
Maskelyne Close, SW11 Maskelyne Close is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Park South, SW11 Park South is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Parkgate Road, SW11 Parkgate Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Parkham Street, SW11 Parkham Street is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Paveley Drive, SW11 Paveley Drive is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Petworth Street, SW11 Petworth Street was laid out in the late nineteenth century linking two bridge approaches - Albert Bridge Road and Battersea Bridge Road.
Raasay Street, SW10 Raasay Street ran from Dartrey Road to Edith Grove.
Radstock Street, SW11 Radstock Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Rainsome Dock, SW11 Rainsome Dock is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Randall Close, SW11 Randall Close is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Ransomes Dock Business Centre, SW11 Ransomes Dock Business Centre is a block on Parkgate Road.
Ransomes Dock, SW11 Ransomes Dock is a development in Battersea.
Riley Street, SW10 Riley Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Riverside, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Rosenau Road, SW11 Rosenau Road was named after Schloss Rosenau, the birthplace and boyhood home of Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, who became the consort of Queen Victoria.
Searles Close, SW11 Searles Close is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Slaidburn Street, SW10 Slaidburn Street is a street in London
St Mary Le Park Court, SW11 St Mary Le Park Court is a block on Albert Bridge Road.
Stadium Street, SW10 Stadium Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Sunbury Lane, SW11 Sunbury Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Surrey Lane Estate, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Surrey Lane, SW11 Surrey Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Thames Avenue, SW10 Thames Avenue is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Thames Towpath, SW10 Thames Towpath is a road in the SW10 postcode area
The Lanterns, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
The Parkgate Road, SW11 The Parkgate Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Upper Whistler Walk, SW10 This is a street in the SW10 postcode area
Valiant House, SW11 Residential block
Vicarage Walk, SW11 Vicarage Walk is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Waterfront Drive, SW10 Waterfront Drive is a location in London.
Watford Close, SW11 Watford Close is a small street on the Ethelburga Estate.
Wendle Square, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Westbridge Road, SW11 Westbridge Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Whistlers Avenue, SW11 Whistlers Avenue is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Worfield Street, SW11 Worfield Street runs north from Rosenau Road towards Parkgate Road.
World’s End Passage, SW10 World’s End Passage is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Worlds End Place, SW10 Worlds End Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Prince Albert This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Prince Albert Originally called the Albert Tavern, the Prince Albert public house is a three storey building dating from 1866-68.
The Union Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
The Fascination of Chelsea
TUM image id: 1524258115
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Elm Park Gardens
TUM image id: 1573064988
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Petworth Street sign
TUM image id: 1493989872
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Albert Bridge opened in 1873 and was immediately designated as a dangerous structure. It was noticed early on that vibrations could threaten the structural integrity of the bridge.
Credit: The Underground Map
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Battersea Bridge (1860s)
Credit: James Hedderly
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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The Dancing Platform at Cremorne Gardens
Credit: Phoebus Levin (1864)
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Battersea High Street
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Winders Road
Credit: The Underground Map
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Old Battersea Bridge, Walter Greaves (oil on canvas, 1874) Old Battersea Bridge, seen from upstream, on Lindsey Row (now Cheyne Walk), with Battersea on the far shore. The boatyard belonging to the Greaves family is in the foreground. On the extreme left is the wall surrounding the garden of the artist William Bell Scott. In the far distance Crystal Palace is just visible. Battersea Bridge was demolished in 1881, and replaced with the present bridge. Before the alterations Greaves recalled the danger to shipping and the difficulty of steering through the arches unless the ‘set of the tide was known’.
Credit: Tate Gallery
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Battersea Bridge, a painting by John Atkinson Grimshaw (1885)
Credit: The Maas Gallery
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Albert Bridge Road at the former end of Ethelburga Street (1958)
Credit: Gwyneth Wexler
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