Torrington Grove, N12

Road in/near North Finchley

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(51.61547 -0.16496, 51.615 -0.164) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · North Finchley · N12 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Torrington Grove is one of the streets of London in the N12 postal area.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
   
Added: 16 Dec 2020 11:17 GMT   

Halliwick Manor House
My mother lived here for two or three years, in the 1920s (born 1922) with family, after First World War, which my grandfather fought in.....then after the war, grandfather looked after all the horses/shire horses at Halliwick Manor......

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

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Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

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Lived here
David James Bloomfield   
Added: 13 Jul 2021 11:54 GMT   

Hurstway Street, W10
Jimmy Bloomfield who played for Arsenal in the 1950s was brought up on this street. He was a QPR supporter as a child, as many locals would be at the time, as a teen he was rejected by them as being too small. They’d made a mistake

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Comment
Added: 6 Jul 2021 05:38 GMT   

Wren Road in the 1950s and 60s
Living in Grove Lane I knew Wren Road; my grandfather’s bank, Lloyds, was on the corner; the Scout District had their office in the Congregational Church and the entrance to the back of the Police station with the stables and horses was off it. Now very changed - smile.

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fariba   
Added: 28 Jun 2021 00:48 GMT   

Tower Bridge Business Complex, S
need for my coursework

Source: university

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Lived here
Kim Johnson   
Added: 24 Jun 2021 19:17 GMT   

Limehouse Causeway (1908)
My great grandparents were the first to live in 15 Tomlins Terrace, then my grandparents and parents after marriage. I spent the first two years of my life there. My nan and her family lived at number 13 Tomlins Terrace. My maternal grandmother lived in Maroon house, Blount Street with my uncle. Nan, my mum and her brothers were bombed out three times during the war.

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Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Dwight School London Dwight London is a mixed independent school which accepts students between the ages of 2 and 18.
Friary Park Friary Park is a nine hectare formal Edwardian park.
Friern Barnet Friern Barnet is located at the intersection of Colney Hatch Lane (running north and south), Woodhouse Road (taking westbound traffic towards North Finchley) and Friern Barnet Road (leading east towards New Southgate).

NEARBY STREETS
Ashurst Road, N12 Ashurst Road was built by the British Land Company.
Ashurst. Road, N12 A street within the N12 postcode
Beech Lawns, N12 Beech Lawns appeared for the first time in Kelly’s Directory of Finchley & Friern Barnet in 1938 as ‘Beech Court’.
Beechvale Close, N11 A street within the N12 postcode
Bensley Close, N11 A street within the N11 postcode
Boxworth Close, N12 Boxworth Close is a road in the N12 postcode area
Bramber Road, N12 Bramber Road was built on the former land of the White House Estate.
Buxted Road, N12 Buxted Road was laid out in 1913.
Cardrew Avenue, N12 Cardrew Avenue dates from 1936.
Cardrew Close, N12 Cardrew Close lies on the Cardrew House Estate.
Constable Close, N11 A street within the N11 postcode
Copwood Close, N12 Copwood Close is a road in the N12 postcode area
Cottonham Close, N12 Cottonham Close is a road in the N12 postcode area
Fenstanton Avenue, N12 Fenstanton Avenue is one of the streets of London in the N12 postal area.
Ferncroft Avenue, N12 Ferncroft Avenue is one of the streets of London in the N12 postal area.
Friary Close, N12 Friary Close appears for the first time in Kelly’s Directory of Finchley & Friern Barnet in 1930.
Friary Road, N12 Friary Road links Torrington Park and Friern Barnet Lane.
Friary Road, N12 Friary Road is a location in London.
Friary Way, N12 Friary Way dates from the late 1920s and was formerly a private road.
Friern Barnet Lane, N11 Friern Barnet Lane was an important road by 1814.
Friern Park, N12 Friern Park was originnally part of Henry Holden’s Friern Park estate.
Glenhurst Road, N12 The planning application for Glenhurst Road was made in 1937.
Goldsmith Road, N11 Goldsmith Road was part of Stanford Road until 1895.
Grove Road, N12 Grove Road is one of the streets of London in the N12 postal area.
Hatley Close, N11 Hatley Close appears for the first time in Kelly’s Directory of Finchley & Friern Barnet in 1935.
Hemingford Close, N12 Hemingford Close is a road in the N12 postcode area
Hemington Avenue, N11 Hemington Avenue is one of the streets of London in the N11 postal area.
Hilton Avenue, N12 Hilton Avenue is one of the streets of London in the N12 postal area.
Holly Croft, N12 A street within the N12 postcode
Horsham Avenue, N12 Horsham Avenue is one of the streets of London in the N12 postal area.
Leadbeaters Close, N11 Leadbeaters Close is a road in the N11 postcode area
Lewes Road, N12 Lewes Road is one of the streets of London in the N12 postal area.
Lyndhurst Avenue, N11 Lyndhurst Avenue is one of the streets of London in the N12 postal area.
Northwood Gardens, N12 Northwood Gardens is a road in the N12 postcode area
Okehampton Close, N12 Okehampton Close was built on the site of a house called Okehampton.
Park Close, N20 Park Close is a road in the N20 postcode area
Park Court, N12 A street within the N12 postcode
Park Way, N20 Park Way is a road in the N20 postcode area
Petworth Road, N12 Petworth Road runs from Woodhouse Road to Buxted Road.
Priory Villas, N11 A street within the N11 postcode
Queens Parade Close, N11 A street within the N11 postcode
Rosebank Close, N12 A street within the N12 postcode
St Michael’s Close, N12 St Michael’s Close is a road in the N12 postcode area
The Lindens, N12 The Lindens is one of the streets of London in the N12 postal area.
The Ridgeway, N11 The Ridgeway is one of the streets of London in the N11 postal area.
Torrington Avenue, N12 Torrington Avenue was built in 1935 as part of the Cardrew House Estate.
Torrington Close, N12 A street within the N12 postcode
Torrington Park, N11 Torrington Park is a road in the N11 postcode area
Torrington Park, N12 Torrington Park had been part of Henry Holden’s Friern Park estate lying east of the Great North Road.
Valley Avenue, N12 Valley Avenue is a road in the N12 postcode area
Victoria Grove, N12 This is a street in the N12 postcode area
Warnham Road, N12 Warnham Road is one of the streets of London in the N12 postal area.
Welbeck Close, N12 Welbeck Close is a road in the N12 postcode area

NEARBY PUBS
Friary Park Bowling Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Malt and Hops
Credit: Pubology
TUM image id: 1527517651
Licence: CC BY 2.0

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