ABPC Elstree Studios

Studios (Film) in/near Borehamwood, existing between 1925 and now

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(51.65791 -0.26981, 51.657 -0.269) 

ABPC Elstree Studios

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Studios (Film) · * · WD6 ·
MAY
6
2016

British National Pictures Ltd purchased 50 acres of land on the south side of Shenley Road and began construction of two large film stages in 1925. The first film produced there was Madame Pompadour in 1927.

British International Pictures Ltd (BIP) took over the studios in 1927 and the second stage was ready for production in 1928. In 1929 Blackmail, the first British talkie to go on release, was produced at the studios. With the death of silent films came the construction of 6 new sound stages on the site and three of these were sold on to the British and Dominions Film Corporation with BIP retaining the remaining stages. BIP were absorbed into the Associated British Picture Corporation (ABPC) in the early 1930s.

In 1946 Warner Brothers acquired a substantial interest in ABPC, appointed a new board and decided to rebuild the stages. The rebuild was completed in 1948 and work began on Man On The Run followed by The Hasty Heart starring Richard Todd and Ronald Reagan. In 1968 Electrical and Musical Industries (EMI) bought control of ABPC and the studios were renamed EMI Studios, later Thorn-EMI Studios. In 1985 they were put up for sale. Under Herron-Cannon Group ownership, the studios were used for some very well-known films including the first three Star Wars films, and the Indiana Jones trilogy. At one time during the 1980s, six of the top ten box office hits of all time had been produced at the studios. In 1988, Cannon sold the studios to the leisure and property company Brent Walker plc and much of the backlot was sold off and a Tesco superstore was built.

Hertsmere Borough Council stepped in and bought the remaining studio in February 1996.

The studios were most commonly known for being the home of Who Wants To Be A Millionaire? and the location of the Big Brother UK house.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


ABPC Elstree Studios</SPAN>

ABPC Elstree Studios

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
105 Shenley Road, WD6 105 Shenley Road lies along the main street of Borehamwood.
66 Shenley Road, WD6 66 Shenley Road used to lie on the corner of Furzehill Road.
68 Shenley Road 68 Shenley Road was a shop on the corner of Furzehill Road - now disappeared.
ABPC Elstree Studios British National Pictures Ltd purchased 50 acres of land on the south side of Shenley Road and began construction of two large film stages in 1925. The first film produced there was Madame Pompadour in 1927.
Boreham Wood Baptist Church The Baptist Church, situated on the corner of Furzehill Road, opened on 14 July 1911.
Bullbaiter’s Farm Bullbaiter’s Farm in 1905.
Bullbaiters Farm Bullbaiters Farm near Boreham Wood was originally called Bullbeggar's Farm - Bullbeggar meaning 'hobgoblin' or 'scarecrow'.
Bullbaiter’s Farm Sale (1905) Bullbaiter’s Farm was located at the bottom of the modern Bullhead Road.
Buses in Shenley Road A 292 and 358 in Shenley Road.
Fox and Clark Furniture Shop (1905) The Fox and Clark Furniture Shop was situated at 73 Shenley Road, Boreham Wood.
Hillside School Hillside School existed between 1939 and 2000.
Horse and cart at Bullbaiter’s Farm Addition to Bullbaiter's Farm
Neptune House Neptune House, built as part of the ATV studios, is now part of the BBC studios.
Shenley Road (1930s) Shenley Road, Borehamwood in the 1930s
Shenley Road water tank Shenley Road tank was a fire prevention feature of Boreham Wood.
The Myriad Stores Added photo for 49 Shenley Road, WD6

NEARBY STREETS
Aberford Road, WD6 Aberford Road is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Albert Square, WD6 Albert Square is the fictional location of the BBC soap opera EastEnders.
Ark Avenue, WD6 Ark Avenue has been built on the former Holmshill School site.
Badminton Close, WD6 Badminton Close is a cul-de-sac running north from Stratfield Road.
Barton Way, WD6 Barton Way is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Brook Close, WD6 Brook Close is a location in London.
Bullhead Road, WD6 Bullhead Road was one of the earliest streets of the Laing Estate.
Canterbury House, WD6 Canterbury House is a tower block in Borehamwood.
Canterbury Road, WD6 Canterbury Road is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Clarendon Road, WD6 Clarendon Road runs north from Shenley Road.
Drayton Road, WD6 Drayton Road is one of the older streets in Borehamwood.
Eldon Avenue, WD6 Eldon Avenue is a street in Borehamwood.
Essex Road, WD6 Essex Road was created just prior to the first world war.
Fairway Avenue, WD6 Fairway Avenue links Brook Road and Eldon Avenue.
Franklin Court, WD6 Franklin Court is a location in London.
George Street, WD6 George Street is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Grosvenor Road, WD6 Grosvenor Road is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Hillside Avenue, WD6 Hillside Avenue was a pre-war road laid out from 1937 onwards.
Holmesley Road, WD6 Holmesley Road is a location in London.
Kenilworth Close, WD6 Kenilworth Close is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Keystone Passage, WD6 Keystone Passage commemorates the Keystone factory.
Liberty Court, WD6 Liberty Court is a location in London.
Malden Road, WD6 Malden Road is parallel to Essex Road.
Maxwell Road, WD6 Maxwell Road is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Meadow Road, WD6 Meadow Road is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Mildred Avenue, WD6 Mildred Avenue is a curious road, being in two halves.
Nicholas Hawksmoor Drive, WD6 Nicholas Hawksmoor Drive is a location in London.
Shenley Road, WD6 Shenley Road is the main street running through Borehamwood.
Todd Close, WD6 Todd Close is a location in London.
Tomblin Close, WD6 Tomblin Close is a location in London.
Turpin Road, WD6 A street within the KT17 postcode
Whitehouse Avenue, WD6 Whitehouse Avenue was originally to be called Cornwall Avenue.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Aberford Park lake
TUM image id: 1557403472
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Clarendon Road, WD6
TUM image id: 1469027977
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Shenley Road, WD6
TUM image id: 1469289026
Licence: CC BY 2.0
1 Shenley Road, WD6
TUM image id: 1469916137
Licence: CC BY 2.0
7 Shenley Road, WD6
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Licence: CC BY 2.0
35 Shenley Road, WD6
TUM image id: 1469322616
Licence: CC BY 2.0
37 Shenley Road, WD6
TUM image id: 1469362142
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39 Shenley Road, WD6
TUM image id: 1469362240
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49 Shenley Road, WD6
TUM image id: 1469360460
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
View of Borehamwood (1928)
Credit: Aerofilms
TUM image id: 1556885103
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Clarendon Road, WD6
TUM image id: 1469027977
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Horses and a cart at Bullbaiters (Bullbeggar’s) Farm c1880. The area has been built over and the farm was approximately where Bullhead Road, Boreham Wood is now. Bullbeggar meant "hobgoblin" or "scarecrow."
TUM image id: 1469052965
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Farmer George King retired from running Bullbaiter’s Farm on 25 March 1905. The farm was the property of the Earl of Strafford of Wrotham Park, South Mimms.
TUM image id: 1469056023
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Auction of farm goods after the retirement of farmer George King.
TUM image id: 1469056803
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Shenley Road, WD6
TUM image id: 1469289026
Licence: CC BY 2.0
71 Shenley Road, WD6
TUM image id: 1469361709
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73 Shenley Road, WD6
TUM image id: 1469393514
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Where Norlands and Sainsbury's met. 1960s.
Credit: Keith Turner
TUM image id: 1479060313
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The entrance to Opus Court.
Credit: Google Maps
TUM image id: 1479055641
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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