Vauxhall Cross, SW8

Road in/near Vauxhall, existing until now

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(51.48609 -0.12354, 51.486 -0.123) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · * · SW8 ·
October
24
2020

Vauxhall Cross is now known as the site of the MI5 headquarters.

10584
The area in front of the bus station was formerly a large junction known as Vauxhall Cross. Upper Kennington Lane was a major thoroughfare linking Vauxhall Bridge with the Elephant and Castle with Vauxhall Cross the junction formed with roads coming from the south.

At the beginning of the nineteenth century, it was the site of a turnpike.




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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Bruce McTavish   
Added: 11 Mar 2021 11:37 GMT   

Kennington Road
Lambeth North station was opened as Kennington Road and then Westminster Bridge Road before settling on its final name. It has a wonderful Leslie Green design.

Reply
Comment
Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   

Bessborough Place, SW1V
I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved London. The stucco houses were a feature and the backs of the houses enabled parents to see thier children playing.

Reply

Johnshort   
Added: 7 Oct 2017 21:07 GMT   

Hurley Road, SE11
There were stables in the road mid way - also Danny reading had a coal delivery lorry.

Reply

The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

Reply
Comment
Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   

Saunders Street, SE11
I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 08:59 GMT   

Spigurnell Road, N17
I was born and lived in Spigurnell Road no 32 from 1951.My father George lived in Spigurnell Road from 1930’s.When he died in’76 we moved to number 3 until I got married in 1982 and moved to Edmonton.Spigurnell Road was a great place to live.Number 32 was 2 up 2 down toilet out the back council house in those days

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Comment
Lewis   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 20:48 GMT   

Ploy
Allotment

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Archbishop Tenison’s School Archbishop Tenison’s School moved to The Oval in 1928
Vauxhall Gardens Vauxhall Gardens was a pleasure garden, one of the leading venues for public entertainment from the mid 17th century to the mid 19th century.
Vauxhall Station early 1900s. Vauxhall at the turn of the twentieth century.

NEARBY STREETS
Albert Embankment, SW8 Albert Embankment is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Ashmole Street, SW8 Ashmole Street was named after Elias Ashmole, a noted 17th century antiquarian, who lived near here
Auckland Street, SE11 Auckland Street is a continuation of Glyn Street.
Bedser Close, SE11 Bedser Close is named for Alec Bedser, widely regarded as one of the best English cricketers of the 20th century, by association with the nearby Oval Cricket Ground.
Bessborough Gardens, SW1V Bessborough Gardens is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Bondway, SW8 Bondway is named after the late 18th century developers of the street, John and Sarah Bond.
Bonnington Square, SW8 Bonnington Square was built in the 1870s to house railway workers.
Bridgefoot, SW8 Bridgefoot is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Citadel Place, SE11 Citadel Place is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Crown Reach Riverside Walk, SW1V Crown Reach Riverside Walk is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Dolland House, SE11 Residential block
Durham Street, SE11 Durham Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Ebbisham Drive, SW8 Ebbisham Drive is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Exchange Gardens, SW8 Exchange Gardens is a location in London.
Farnham Royal, SE11 Farnham Royal is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Glasshouse Walk, SE11 Glasshouse Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Glyn Street, SE11 Glyn Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Goding Street, SE11 Goding Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Graphite Square, SE11 Graphite Square is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Harleyford Road, SE11 Harleyford Road was named after local leaseholders the Claytons, whose country house was Harleyford Manor, Buckinghamshire.
Jameson House, SE11 Residential block
Jonathan Street, SE11 Jonathan Street commemorates Jonathan Tyers who was the owner of the Vauxhall Gardens during the 1700s.
Kennington Oval, SW8 Kennington Oval is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Langley Lane, SW8 Langley Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Laud Street, SE11 Laud Street is a road in the SE11 postcode area
Lawn Lane, SW8 Lawn Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Lindsay Square, SW1V Lindsay Square is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Market Towers, SW8 Market Towers is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Miles Street, SW8 Miles Street was developed from 1778 onwards by the Sarah and John Bond.
New Covent Garden Market, SW8 New Covent Garden Market is a location in London.
Orsett Street, SE11 Orsett Street is a road in the SE11 postcode area
Oval Way, SE11 Oval Way is a road in the SE11 postcode area
Park Place, SW8 Park Place is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Parry Street, SW8 Parry Street was laid out by John and Sarah Bond.
Ponsonby Place, SW1V Ponsonby Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Ponsonby Terrace, SW1V Ponsonby Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Riverside Walk, SW1P Riverside Walk skirts the gardens of the same name.
Riverside Walk, SW8 Riverside Walk is part of the Thames Path long-distance footpath.
Simpson House, SE11 Residential block
South Lambeth Place, SW8 South Lambeth Place links South Lambeth Road to Bondway.
Spring Mews, SE11 Spring Mews is a location in London.
St George Wharf, SW8 St George Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
St Oswalds Place, SE11 St Oswalds Place is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
St. Oswalds Place, SE11 St. Oswalds Place is a location in London.
Studios, SE11 Studios is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Tent City, SE11 Tent City is a road in the NW10 postcode area
Tinworth Street, SE11 Tinworth Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Tyers Street, SE11 Tyers Street is named for Jonathan Tyers who was the eighteenth century owner of the Vauxhall Gardens.
Tyers Terrace, SE11 Tyers Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Vauxhall Bridge, SW1P Vauxhall Bridge is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Vauxhall Bridge, SW1V Vauxhall Bridge is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Vauxhall Grove, SW8 Vauxhall Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Vauxhall Street, SE11 Vauxhall Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Vauxhall Walk, SE11 Vauxhall Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Viaduct Gardens, SW8 Viaduct Gardens runs beside the United States Embassy building in Nine Elms.
Vox Studios 1-45, SE11 Vox Studios 1-45 is a location in London.
West Bridge, SW8 West Bridge is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Westminster Business Square, SE11 Westminster Business Square is a business centre.
Wickham Street, SE11 Wickham Street is a road in the SE11 postcode area
Worgan Street, SE11 Worgan Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Eagle London South Central This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Fire This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Renaissance Rooms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Beehive This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Black Dog This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Riverside (Unit 14) This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Roebuck This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Rose This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Royal Vauxhall Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Vauxhall

Vauxhall is an inner city area of Central London in the London Borough of Lambeth.

It is generally accepted that the etymology of Vauxhall is from the name of Falkes de Breauté, the head of King John's mercenaries, who owned a large house in the area, which was referred to as Faulke's Hall, later Foxhall, and eventually Vauxhall.

There is no mention of Vauxhall in the 1086 Domesday Book. The area formed part of the extensive Manor of South Lambeth. From various accounts three local roads, the South Lambeth Road, Clapham Road (previously called Merton Road) and Wandsworth Road (previously called Kingston Road) were ancient and well known routes to and from London. The area was flat and marshy with parts poorly drained by ditches. The area only started to be developed in the mid 18th century. Prior to this it provided market garden produce for the nearby City of London.

The area only became generally known by this name when the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens opened as a public attraction. Initially most visitors would have approached by river, but crowds of Londoners of all classes came to know the area after the construction of Westminster Bridge in the 1740s.

There are competing theories as to why the Russian word for a central railway station is vokzal, which coincides with the 19th-century transliteration of Vauxhall. It has long been suggested that a Russian delegation visited the area to inspect the construction of the London and South Western Railway in 1840, and mistook the name of the station for the generic name of the building type. The locality of the L&SWR's original railway terminus, Nine Elms Station, was shown boldly and simply as Vauxhall in the 1841 Bradshaw timetable.

Another likely explanation is that the first Russian railway, constructed in 1837, ran from Saint Petersburg via Tsarskoye Selo to Pavlovsk Palace, where extensive Pleasure Gardens had earlier been established. In 1838 a music and entertainment pavilion was constructed at the railway terminus. This pavilion was called the Vokzal in homage to the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens in London. The name soon came to be applied to the station itself, which was the gateway that most visitors used to enter the gardens. It later came to mean any substantial railway station building.

It has also given its name to the Vauxhall Motors car manufacturer, which originated in the area.

Vauxhall station was opened by the London and South Western Railway (LSWR) as 'Vauxhall Bridge Station' on 11 July 1848 when the main line was extended from Nine Elms to Waterloo, then 'Waterloo Bridge Station'. It is on a viaduct with eight platforms. The deep tube London Underground station is on the Victoria line, and opened on 23 July 1971.

Vauxhall was located next to a major creamery and milk bottling plant for United Dairies. Milk trains from all over the West Country would stop at Clapham Junction in the evening, and reduce their length by half so that they did not block Vauxhall station while unloading. They would then proceed to Vauxhall, and pull into the down side platform, where a discharge pipe was provided to the creamery on the other side of the road. There was also pedestrian access from below the station, under the road to the depot, in the tunnel where the pipeline ran. Unloaded trains would then proceed to Waterloo, where they would reverse and return to Clapham Junction to pick up the other half of the train. The procedure was then repeated, so that the entire milk train was unloaded between the end of evening peak traffic and the start of the following morning.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Nine Elms
TUM image id: 1488201136
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Fentiman Road
TUM image id: 1544889021
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Church Street (1866)
TUM image id: 1575388511
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Nine Elms
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Fentiman Road
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South Lambeth Place
Credit: The Underground Map
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Lower Fore Street, a narrow cobblestoned street in Lambeth, pictured in 1865. Fore Street is shown on John Roque’s map of 1746. It ran alongside the river between Vauxhall Gardens and Lambeth Palace.
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Upper Fore Street, Lambeth (1860s)
Credit: William Strudwick (1834-1910)
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"A Sunset with a View of Nine Elms" (c.1755)
Credit: Samuel Scott/Tate Britain
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"The Thames from Millbank", oil on canvas, Richard Redgrave (1804-1888), created around 1836. The scene depicted is around the year 1815.
Credit: Richard Redgrave/Victoria and Albert Museum
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