Coach and Horses

Pub in/near Notting Hill Gate, existing until 1957

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(51.50892 -0.197775, 51.508 -0.197) 

Coach and Horses

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Pub · * · ·
MAY
30
2015

The Coach & Horses was situated at 108 Notting Hill Gate.

Mr Drinkwater, landlord of the Coach and Horses, then ‘still a small and primitive tavern’ was prosecuted for selling spirits at the Kensington Hippodrome in the 1830s.

In "Bygone Days", Florence Gladstone added in his defence, ‘the tavern itself was reputed to be quiet and respectable, instead of being a refuge for highwaymen as of old.’

The pub closed in 1957 and has now been demolished.

By 2015, the site was occupied by McDonald's beneath Campden Hill Towers.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence




#Coach and Horses

CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Joan Clarke   
Added: 2 Feb 2021 10:54 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My late aunt Ivy Clarke (nee Burridge) lived with her whole family at 19 Avondale Park Gardens, according to the 1911 census and she was still there in 1937.What was it like in those days, I wonder, if the housing was only built in 1920?


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Dave Fahey   
Added: 6 Jan 2021 02:40 GMT   

Bombing of the Jack O Newberry
My maternal grandfather, Archie Greatorex, was the licensee of the Earl of Warwick during the Second World War. My late mother Vera often told the story of the bombing of the Jack. The morning after the pub was bombed, the landlord’s son appeared at the Warwick with the pub’s till on an old pram; he asked my grandfather to pay the money into the bank for him. The poor soul was obviously in shock. The previous night, his parents had taken their baby down to the pub cellar to shelter from the air raids. The son, my mother never knew his name, opted to stay in his bedroom at the top of the building. He was the only survivor. I often wondered what became of him.

Reply
Comment
ken gaston   
Added: 16 Jan 2021 11:04 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My grandmother Hilda Baker and a large family lived in number 18 . It was a close community and that reflected in the coronation celebration held on the central green . I grew up in that square and went to school at Sirdar Road then St. Clements it was a great place to grow up with a local park and we would also trek to Holland Park or Kensington Gardens .Even then the area was considered deprived and a kindergarden for criminals . My generation were the first to escape to the new towns and became the overspill from London to get decent housing and living standards .

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David Jones-Parry   
Added: 7 Sep 2017 12:13 GMT   

Mcgregor Road, W11 (1938 - 1957)
I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them on.no questions asked.A very happy boyhood -from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.

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Comment
donna    
Added: 25 Jan 2021 13:25 GMT   

Ladbroke Dwellings
Three generations of my family lived along this row of dwellings, ’Ladbroke Dwellings’. All the men who lived there worked at the Gasworks. Among the shops you mention was Wilson’s sweet shop run by Maggie and her sister, and Johns grocery store. I believe there was also a photograph studio there too.



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Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 15:38 GMT   

6 East Row (1960 - 1960)
We lived at 6 East Row just before it was demolished.

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Tom Vague   
Added: 9 Sep 2020 14:02 GMT   

The Bedford family at 3 Acklam Road (1860 - 1965)
From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family.

When the Westway construction work began the Bedfords sold up and moved to south London. In the early 1970s the house was taken over by the North Kensington Amenity Trust and became the Notting Hill Carnival office before its eventual demolition.

Anne Bedford (now McSweeney) has fond memories of living there, although she recalls: ‘I now know that the conditions were far from ideal but then I knew no different. There was no running hot water, inside toilet or bath, apart from the tin bath we used once a week in the large kitchen/dining room. Any hot water needed was heated in a kettle. I wasn’t aware that there were people not far away who were a lot worse off than us, living in poverty in houses just like mine but families renting one room. We did have a toilet/bathroom installed in 1959, which was ‘luxury’.

‘When the plans for the Westway were coming to light, we were still living in the house whilst all the houses opposite became empty and boarded up one by one. We watched all this going on and decided that it was not going to be a good place to be once the builders moved in to demolish all the houses and start work on the elevated road. Dad sold the house for a fraction of what it should have been worth but it needed too much doing to it to bring it to a good living standard. We were not rich by any means but we were not poor. My grandmother used to do her washing in the basement once a week by lighting a fire in a big concrete copper to heat the water, which would have been there until demolition.

‘When we moved from number 3, I remember the upright piano that my grandparents used to play – and me of sorts – being lowered out of the top floor and taken away, presumably to be sold. I used to play with balls up on the wall of the chemist shop on the corner of Acklam and Portobello. We would mark numbers on the pavement slabs in a grid and play hopscotch. At the Portobello corner, on one side there was the Duke of Sussex pub, on the other corner, a chemist, later owned by a Mr Fish, which I thought was amusing. When I was very young I remember every evening a man peddling along Acklam Road with a long thin stick with which he lit the streetlights.’ Michelle Active who lived at number 33 remembers: ‘6 of us lived in a one-bed basement flat on Acklam Road. When they demolished it we moved to a 4-bed maisonette on Silchester Estate and I thought it was a palace, two toilets inside, a separate bathroom that was not in the kitchen, absolute heaven.’



Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Comment
GRaleigh   
Added: 23 Feb 2021 09:34 GMT   

Found a bug
Hi all! Thank you for your excellent site. I found an overlay bug on the junction of Glengall Road, NW6 and Hazelmere Road, NW6 on the 1950 map only. It appears when one zooms in at this junction and only on the zoom.

Cheers,
Geoff Raleigh

Source: Glengall Road, NW6

Reply
Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

Reply

Christine Clark   
Added: 20 Feb 2021 11:27 GMT   

Number 44 (1947 - 1967)
The Clark’s moved here from Dorking my father worked on the Thames as a captain of shell mex tankers,there were three children, CHristine, Barbara and Frank, my mother was Ida and my father Frank.Our house no 44 and 42 were pulled down and we were relocated to Bromley The rest of our family lived close by in Milton Court Rd, Brocklehurat Street, Chubworthy street so one big happy family..lovely days.

Reply

Linda    
Added: 18 Feb 2021 22:03 GMT   

Pereira Street, E1
My grandfather Charles Suett lived in Periera Street & married a widowed neighbour there. They later moved to 33 Bullen House, Collingwood Street where my father was born.

Reply
Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

Reply
Born here
Vanessa Whitehouse   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 22:48 GMT   

Born here
My dad 1929 John George Hall

Reply

   
Added: 16 Feb 2021 13:41 GMT   

Giraud Street
I lived in Giraud St in 1938/1939. I lived with my Mother May Lillian Allen & my brother James Allen (Known as Lenny) My name is Tom Allen and was evacuated to Surrey from Giraud St. I am now 90 years of age.

Reply

Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

Reply
NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Aubrey House Aubrey House is a large 18th-century detached house with two acres of gardens in the Campden Hill area of Holland Park.
Coach and Horses The Coach & Horses was situated at 108 Notting Hill Gate.
Horbury Chapel (Kensington Temple) In September 1849, the Horbury Chapel, Notting Hill was officially opened.
Ladbroke Square Garden Ladbroke Square communal garden lies in Notting Hill.
Mercury Theatre The Mercury Theatre was situated at 2a Ladbroke Road, next to the Kensington Temple.
Notting Hill in Bygone Days Notting Hill in Bygone Days by Florence Gladstone, was originally published in 1924 by T. Fisher Unwin.
St John’s Hill St John’s Hill is the highest point in the area.
St John’s, Notting Hill St John’s Notting Hill is a Victorian Anglican church built in 1845 in Lansdowne Crescent, Notting Hill.

NEARBY STREETS
Airlie Gardens, W8 Airlie Gardens is named after the 5th Earl of Airlie (1826-1881), who lived on nearby Campden Hill at Holly Lodge.
Aubrey Road, W8 Aubrey Road leads into Aubrey Walk, which runs west of Campden Hill Road at the top of Campden Hill. It was named in the 1840s.
Aubrey Walk, W8 Aubrey Walk runs west of Campden Hill Road at the top of Campden Hill.
Bedford Gardens, W8 Bedford Gardens is one of the prime residential streets in Kensington.
Berkeley Gardens, W8 Berkeley Gardens is a short street which runs between Brunswick Gardens and Kensington Church Street containing terraced houses on both sides with small front gardens.
Boyne Terrace Mews, W11 Boyne Terrace Mews is a mews in Notting Hill, London W11.
Brunswick Gardens, W8 Brunswick Gardens runs north from Vicarage Gate - a wide tree-lined road with white stuccoed terraces on either side.
Bulmer Mews, W11 Bulmer Mews is a tiny mews behind Notting Hill Gate.
Callcott Street, W8 Callcott Street is a small street between Uxbridge Street and Hillgate Place.
Campden Hill Gardens, W8 Campden Hill Gardens runs northwards from Aubrey Walk.
Campden Hill Place, W11 Campden Hill Place is a road in the W11 postcode area
Campden Hill Square, W8 Campden Hill Square is a residential square consisting of large family houses.
Campden Hill Towers, W11 Campden Hill Towers is a block.
Campden Street, W8 Campden Street stretches between Campden Hill Road and Kensington Church Street.
Chepstow Crescent, W11 Chepstow Crescent is a street in Notting Hill.
Clanricarde Gardens, W2 Clanricarde Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Dawson Place, W2 Dawson Place is a street in Paddington.
Denbigh Close, W11 Denbigh Close is a street in Notting Hill.
Edge Street, W8 Edge Street is a street in Kensington.
Evesham House, W2 Residential block
Farm Place, W8 Farm Place was formerly called Earnest Street.
Farmer Street, W8 Farmer Street was formerly Farm Street.
Hillgate Place, W8 Hillgate Place was formerly Dartmoor Street.
Hillgate Street, W8 Hillgate Street was formerly Johnson Street.
Hillsleigh Road, W8 Hillsleigh Road is a street in Kensington.
Holland Walk, W8 Holland Walk is a street in Notting Hill.
Holland Walk, W8 Holland Walk is a street in Kensington.
Horbury Crescent, W11 Horbury Crescent is a short half-moon shaped street between Ladbroke Road and Kensington Park Road.
Horbury Mews, W11 Horbury Mews is a T-shaped mews in Notting Hill.
Ilchester Gardens, W2 Ilchester Gardens is a road in the W2 postcode area
Inverness Gardens, W8 Inverness Gardens is a street in Kensington.
Jameson Street, W8 Jameson Street was formerly St James or James Street.
Kensington Church Street, W8 Kensington Church Street is a street in Kensington.
Kensington Mall, W8 Kensington Mall is a street in Kensington.
Kensington Park Gardens, W11 Kensington Park Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Kensington Place, W8 Kensington Place is a street in Kensington.
Ladbroke Road, W11 Ladbroke Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Ladbroke Square, W11 The huge Ladbroke Square communal garden is part communal garden accessed from the backs of the houses lining it and part traditional London Square with roads between the houses and the square.
Ladbroke Terrace, W11 Ladbroke Terrace was one of the first streets to be created on the Ladbroke estate.
Ladbroke Walk, W11 Ladbroke Walk, W11 is part of the Ladbroke Conversation Area.
Lansdowne Walk, W11 Lansdowne Walk was named after the Lansdowne area of Cheltenham.
Linden Gardens, W2 Linden Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Linden Mews, W2 Linden Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
Lucerne Mews, W8 Lucerne Mews is a street in Kensington.
Moscow Place, W2 Moscow Place is a street in Paddington.
Moscow Road, W2 Moscow Road is a street in Paddington.
Newcombe House, W2 Residential block
Notting Hill Gate, W8 Notting Hill Gate is a main shopping and retail street.
Orme Lane, W2 Orme Lane is a road in the W2 postcode area
Orme Square, W2 Orme Square is named after Edward Orme, formerly a printseller in Bond Street.
Ossington Street, W2 Ossington Street leads from Moscow Road at its north end to the Bayswater Road at its south end.
Palace Court, W2 Palace Court was built in the 1880s to connect the Bayswater Road to Moscow Road.
Palace Gardens Mews, W8 Palace Gardens Mews is a street in Kensington.
Palace Gardens Terrace, W8 Palace Gardens Terrace is a street in Kensington.
Peel Street, W8 Peel Street is a street in Kensington.
Pembridge Crescent, W11 Pembridge Crescent is a street in Notting Hill.
Pembridge Gardens, W11 Pembridge Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Pembridge Mews, W11 Pembridge Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Pembridge Road, W11 Pembridge Road is a street in London
Pembridge Road, W2 Pembridge Road is the former southern end of Portobello Lane.
Pembridge Square, W2 Pembridge Square is a street in Paddington.
Princes Mews, W2 Princes Mews is a street in Paddington.
Rabbit Roe, W8 Rabbit Roe is a street in Kensington.
Sheffield Terrace, W8 Sheffield Terrace is a street in Kensington.
Simon Close, W11 Simon Close is a street in Notting Hill.
St Petersburgh Mews, W2 St Petersburgh Mews is a road in the W2 postcode area
St Petersburgh Place, W2 St Petersburgh Place is a street in Paddington.
Stanley Crescent, W11 Stanley Crescent was named after Edward Stanley.
Stanley Gardens, W11 Stanley Gardens was built in the 1850s.
Uxbridge Street, W8 Uxbridge Street is a street in Kensington.
Vicarage Gardens, W8 Vicarage Gardens is a street in Kensington.
Victoria Gardens, W11 Victoria Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Victoria Mews, W11 Victoria Mews is a location in London.
Wilby Mews, W11 Wilby Mews was named after Benjamin Wilby, who was involved in several 19th century development schemes.
Wycombe Square, W8 Wycombe Square is a road in the W8 postcode area


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Children of Ruston Close
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Notting Hill
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Pembridge Road (1900s)
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201311211613
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Arundel Gardens
Credit: Barbara Avis
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Boyne Terrace Mews, W11
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3-4 Ladbroke Terrace in 2006.
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Notting Hill in Bygone Days
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In the neighbourhood...

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Notting Hill
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Pembridge Road (1900s)
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St Peter's Notting Hill
Credit: Asteuartw
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3-4 Ladbroke Terrace in 2006.
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Notting Hill in Bygone Days
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Ladbroke Walk seen from Ladbroke Terrace (2006)
Credit: Thomas Erskine
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Graffiti at Virgin Records Vernon Yard 1977
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Archer Street which became the westernmost section of Westbourne Grove.
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Stanley Gardens looking towards St Peter’s church.
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Ladbroke Square Garden
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