St Magnus-the-Martyr

Church in/near City of London, existing until now

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Church · * · EC3R ·
APRIL
15
2019

St Magnus the Martyr church is dedicated to St Magnus the Martyr, earl of Orkney, who died on 16 April 1116.

Archaeological evidence suggests that the area of London Bridge head was not occupied from the early 5th century until the early 10th century.

Environmental evidence indicates that the area was waste ground during this period, colonised by elder and nettles. Following Alfred’s decision to reoccupy the walled area of London in 886, new harbours were established at Queenhithe and Billingsgate. A bridge was in place by the early 11th century, a factor which would have encouraged the occupation of the bridgehead by craftsmen and traders.

St Magnus was built to the south of Thames Street to serve the growing population of the bridgehead area and was certainly in existence by 1128-33.

Until 1831, London Bridge was aligned with Fish Street Hill, so the main entrance into the City from the south passed the West door of St Magnus on the north bank of the river. The bridge included a chapel dedicated to St Thomas Becket for the use of pilgrims journeying to Canterbury Cathedral to visit his tomb. The chapel and about two thirds of the bridge were in the parish of St Magnus. The church jutted into the road running to the bridge and it grew in importance.

St Magnus Corner at the north end of London Bridge was an important meeting place in mediaeval London, where notices were exhibited, proclamations read out and wrongdoers punished. As it was conveniently close to the River Thames, the church was chosen by the Bishop between the 15th and 17th centuries as a convenient venue for general meetings of the clergy in his diocese.

The church had a series of distinguished rectors including Myles Coverdale (Rector 1564-66) who oversaw the production of the first complete bible in the English language.

St Magnus narrowly escaped destruction in 1633 in a fire that burned many buildings upon London Bridge but, despite this, the church was one of the first buildings to be destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. St Magnus stood less than 300 yards from the bakehouse of Thomas Farriner in Pudding Lane where the fire started. Farriner, a former churchwarden of St Magnus, was buried in the middle aisle of the church on 11 December 1670, perhaps within a temporary structure erected for holding services.

The parish engaged the master mason George Dowdeswell to start the work of rebuilding in 1668. The work was carried forward between 1671 and 1687 under the direction of Sir Christopher Wren, the body of the church being substantially complete by 1676. At a cost of £9579 19s 10d, St Magnus was one of Wren’s most expensive churches.

Shortly before his death in 1711, Sir Charles Duncombe, Alderman for the Ward of Bridge Within and, in 1708/09, Lord Mayor of London, commissioned an organ for the church, the first to have a swell-box, by Abraham Jordan (father and son). A swell organ uses pipes set apart in a box which can be opened or closed to alter the volume. The organ case, which remains in its original state, is looked upon as one of the finest existing examples of the Grinling Gibbons’s school of wood carving.

Canaletto drew St Magnus and old London Bridge as they appeared in the late 1740s. Between 1756 and 1762, under the London Bridge Improvement Act of 1756, the Corporation of London demolished the buildings on London Bridge to widen the roadway, ease traffic congestion and improve safety for pedestrians.

As part of the bridge improvements, overseen by the architect Sir Robert Taylor, a new pedestrian walkway was built along the eastern side of the bridge. With the other buildings gone St Magnus blocked the new walkway. As a consequence it was necessary in 1762 to 1763 to remove the vestry rooms at the West end of the church and open up the side arches of the tower so that people could pass underneath the tower. The tower’s lower storey thus became an external porch.

By 1782 the noise level from the activities of Billingsgate Fish Market had become unbearable and the large windows on the north side of the church were blocked up leaving only circular windows high up in the wall.

In 1823 royal assent was given to ‘An Act for the Rebuilding of London Bridge’ and in 1825 John Garratt, Lord Mayor and Alderman of the Ward of Bridge Within, laid the first stone of the new London Bridge. In 1831 Sir John Rennie’s new bridge was opened further upstream and the old bridge demolished. St Magnus ceased to be the gateway to London as it had been for over 600 years.

Until 1922 the annual Fish Harvest Festival was celebrated at St Magnus. The service moved in 1923 to St Dunstan in the East, but St Magnus retained close links with the local fish merchants until the closure of old Billingsgate Market. St Magnus is the guild church of the Worshipful Company of Fishmongers and the Worshipful Company of Plumbers, and the ward church of the Ward of Bridge and Bridge Without.

A bomb which fell on London Bridge in 1940 during the Blitz blew out all the windows and damaged the plasterwork and the roof of the north aisle. However, the church was designated a Grade I listed building on 4 January 1950 and repaired in 1951, being re-opened for worship in June of that year by the Bishop of London.

By the early 1960s traffic congestion had become a problem and Lower Thames Street was widened over the next decade to form part of a significant new east-west transport artery. The setting of the church was further affected by the construction of a new London Bridge between 1967 and 1973.

St Magnus’s prominent location and beauty has prompted many mentions in literature. In Oliver Twist, Charles Dickens notes how, as Nancy heads for her secret meeting with Mr Brownlow and Rose Maylie on London Bridge, "the tower of old Saint Saviour’s Church, and the spire of Saint Magnus, so long the giant-warders of the ancient bridge, were visible in the gloom". The church’s spiritual and architectural importance is celebrated in the poem The Waste Land by T. S. Eliot, who adds in a footnote that "the interior of St. Magnus Martyr is to my mind one of the finest among Wren’s interiors".

Just inside the west door is a spectacular model of Old London Bridge.


Main source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Further citations and sources




CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

Reply

Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

Reply

The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT



   
Added: 11 Apr 2021 20:03 GMT   

North Harrow
The North Harrow Embassy Cinema was closed in 1963 and replaced by a bowling alley and a supermarket. As well as the cinema itself there was a substantial restaurant on the first floor.

Source: Embassy Cinema in North Harrow, GB - Cinema Treasures

Reply
Lived here
KJ   
Added: 11 Apr 2021 12:34 GMT   

Family
1900’s Cranmer family lived here at 105 (changed to 185 when road was re-numbered)
James Cranmer wife Louisa ( b.Logan)
They had 3 children one being my grandparent William (Bill) CRANMER married to grandmother “Nancy” He used to go to
Glengall Tavern in Bird in Bush Rd ,now been converted to flats.

Reply
Comment
charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

Reply

Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

Reply
Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

Reply
Born here
Beverly Sand   
Added: 3 Apr 2021 17:19 GMT   

Havering Street, E1
My mother was born at 48 Havering Street. That house no longer exists. It disappeared from the map by 1950. Family name Schneider, mother Ray and father Joe. Joe’s parents lived just up the road at 311 Cable Street

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:13 GMT   

St Jude’s Church, Lancefield Street
Saint Jude’s was constructed in 1878, while the parish was assigned in 1879 from the parish of Saint John, Kensal Green (P87/JNE2). The parish was united with the parishes of Saint Luke (P87/LUK1) and Saint Simon (P87/SIM) in 1952. The church was used as a chapel of ease for a few years, but in 1959 it was closed and later demolished.

The church is visible on the 1900 map for the street on the right hand side above the junction with Mozart Street.

Source: SAINT JUDE, KENSAL GREEN: LANCEFIELD STREET, WESTMINSTER | Londo

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:08 GMT   

Wedding at St Jude’s Church
On 9th November 1884 Charles Selby and Johanna Hanlon got married in St Jude’s Church on Lancefield Street. They lived together close by at 103 Lancefield Street.
Charles was a Lather, so worked in construction. He was only 21 but was already a widower.
Johanna is not shown as having a profession but this is common in the records and elsewhere she is shown as being an Ironer or a Laundress. It is possible that she worked at the large laundry shown at the top of Lancefield Road on the 1900 map. She was also 21. She was not literate as her signature on the record is a cross.
The ceremony was carried out by William Hugh Wood and was witnessed by Charles H Hudson and Caroline Hudson.

Source: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/1623/images/31280_197456-00100?pId=6694792

Reply
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20 Fenchurch Street, EC3M 20 Fenchurch Street is a commercial skyscraper in the City of London.
Abchurch Lane, EC4N Abchurch Lane was first mentioned as Abbechurche Lane in 1291.
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Billiter Street, EC3M Billiter Street was once home to a medieval bell foundry.
Birchin Lane, EC3V Birchin Lane was owned by a medieval gentleman called Birchervere.
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Budge Row, EC4N Budge Row lies off the north side of Cannon Street, about 80 yards west of the main line station.
Bulls Head Passage, EC3M Bulls Head Passage is one of the streets of London in the EC3V postal area.
Bush Lane, EC4R Bush Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Byward Street, EC3R Byward Street was laid out between 1895 and 1906.
Cannon Bridge, EC4R Cannon Bridge is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Cannon Street, EC4N Cannon Street runs nearly parallel with the River Thames, about 250 metres north of it, in the south of the City of London.
Cannon Street, EC4R Cannon Street follows the route of a riverside path that ran along the Thames.
Castle Court, EC3V Castle Court is one of the streets of London in the EC3V postal area.
Cathedral Street, SE1 Cathedral Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Centennium House, EC3R A block within the EC3R postcode
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Clements Lane, EC4N Clements Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4N postal area.
Clink Street, SE1 Clink Street is best known as the historic location of the Clink Prison.
Clink Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Cloak Lane, EC4N Cloak Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Clothworkers Hall, EC3M Clothworkers Hall is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
College Hill, EC4R College Hill is named after Sir Richard Whittington’s college, set up here in the early 1400s.
College Street, EC4R College Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Corbet Court, EC3V Corbet Court is one of the streets of London in the EC3V postal area.
Cottons Centre, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Cottons Lane, SE1 Cottons Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Counter Street, SE1 Counter Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Cousin Lane, EC4R Cousin Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Cullum Street, EC3M Cullum Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3M postal area.
Custom House Walkway, EC3R Custom House Walkway is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Dark Horse Walk, EC3R Dark Horse Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Dowgate Hill, EC4R Dowgate Hill is a continuation of Walbrook along the west side of Cannon Street Station, leading to Dowgate Dock.
Duke St Hill, SE1 Duke St Hill is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Duke Street Hill, SE1 Duke Street Hill is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Dunster Court, EC3R Dunster Court is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
East Building 1, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
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Exchange Steps, EC3V Exchange Steps is one of the streets of London in the EC3V postal area.
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Fenchurch Buildings, EC3A Fenchurch Buildings is one of the streets of London in the EC3M postal area.
Fenchurch Mews, EC3M A street within the EC3M postcode
Fenchurch Place, EC3M Fenchurch Place is one of the streets of London in the EC3M postal area.
Fenchurch Street, EC3M Fenchurch Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3M postal area.
Fish Street Hill, EC3M Fish Street Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
French Ordinary Court, EC3M French Ordinary Court is one of the streets of London in the EC3M postal area.
Garlick Hill, EC4N Garlick Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Gatehouse Square, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
George Yard, EC3V George Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC3V postal area.
Gloucester Court, EC3R Gloucester Court is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Gracechurch Street, EC3V Gracechurch Street is in the heart of Roman Londinium - it runs directly over the site of the basilica and forum.
Grant’s Quay Wharf, EC3R Grant?s Quay Wharf is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Great St Thomas Apostle, EC4R Great St Thomas A postle is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Great St Thomas, EC4R Great St Thomas is one of the streets of London in the EC4V postal area.
Great Tower Street, EC3R Great Tower Street, originally known just as Tower Street, forms an eastern continuation of Eastcheap.
Hanseatic Walk, EC4R Hanseatic Walk is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Hanseatic Walk, EC4R Hanseatic Walk is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Harp Lane, EC3R Harp Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Hart Street, EC3R Hart Street is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Hay’s Lane, SE1 This is a street in the SE1 postcode area
Hays Lane, SE1 Hays Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Hogarth Court, EC3M Hogarth Court runs from Fenchurch Avenue to Fenchurch Street.
Horseshoe Wharf Apartments 6a, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Horseshoe Wharf Apartments, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Idol Lane, EC3R Idol Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
King William Street, EC3V King William Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4N postal area.
King William Street, EC4R King William Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
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Laurence Pountney Lane, EC4N Laurence Pountney Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4N postal area.
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Lime Street, EC3M A street within the EC3M postcode
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Lower Thames Street, EC3R A street within the EC3R postcode
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Mincing Lane, EC3R Mincing Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
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Paul’s Walk, EC3N A street within the EC3N postcode
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Perkins Square, SE1 Perkins Square is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Petty Wales, EC3R Petty Wales is one of the streets of London in the EC3N postal area.
Philpot Lane, EC3M Philpot Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC3M postal area.
Plantain Gardens, EC3M A street within the EC3V postcode
Plantain Gardens, EC3M A street within the EC3V postcode
Plantation Lane, EC3M Plantation Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Plantation Place, EC3R Plantation Place takes its name from a previous Plantation House, once the recognised centre of the tea trade.
Plough Court, EC3V Plough Court was named for the Plough tavern which stood here.
Porter Street, SE1 Porter Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Providian House, EC3R A block within the EC3R postcode
Pudding Lane, EC3R Pudding Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Queen St Place, EC4R Queen St Place is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Queen Street Place, EC4R Queen Street Place is a location in London.
Queen Street, EC4N Queen Street is a street in the City of London which runs between Upper Thames Street at its southern end to Cheapside in the north.
Queen Street, EC4R Queen Street is a street in the City of London which runs between Upper Thames Street and Cheapside.
Queen Victoria Street, EC2R Queen Victoria Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
Railway Approach, SE1 Railway Approach is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Rochester Walk, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
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Royal Court, EC3V Royal Court is one of the streets of London in the EC3V postal area.
Seething Lane, EC3R Seething Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC3N postal area.
Ship Tavern Passage, EC3M Ship Tavern Passage is a City of London alleyway.
Sky Garden Walk, EC3M Sky Garden Walk is a location in London.
Sky Garden, EC3M Sky Garden is a location in London.
Soho Wharf, SE1 Soho Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Southwark Bridge, SE1 This is a street in the EC4R postcode area
St Dunstans Hill, EC3R St Dunstans Hill is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
St Georges Lane, EC3R St Georges Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
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St Michaels Alley, EC3V St Michael’s Alley was the centre of the 17th century London coffee house phenomenon.
St Michaels Rectory, EC3V St Michaels Rectory is one of the streets of London in the EC3V postal area.
St Swithin’s Lane, EC4N St Swithin’s Lane runs from King William Street to Cannon Street.
Stoney Street, SE1 Stoney Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Suffolk Lane, EC4R Suffolk Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Sugar Quay Walk, EC3N Sugar Quay Walk is part of the Thames Path near to the Tower of London.
Swan Lane, EC4R Swan Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Talbot Court, EC3V Talbot Court was next to the Talbot Inn until the Great Fire of London.
Three Cranes Wharf, EC4R Three Cranes Wharf is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Three Crown Square Borough Market, SE1 Three Crown Square Borough Market is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Tower Hill Terrace, EC3N Tower Hill Terrace is one of the streets of London in the EC3N postal area.
Tower Pier, EC3N Tower Pier is a location in London.
Tower Place East, EC3R A street within the EC3R postcode
Tower Place West, EC3R Tower Place West is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Tower Place, EC3R Tower Place is one of the streets of London in the EC3R postal area.
Two London Bridge, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Upper Thames Street, EC4R Upper Thames Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4R postal area.
Vestry House, EC4R Residential block
Victor Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Walbrook, EC4N Walbrook is one of the streets of London in the EC4N postal area.
Watling Street, EC4M Watling Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Watling Street, EC4N Watling Street is one of the streets of London in the EC4N postal area.
Well Court, EC4N Well Court is one of the streets of London in the EC4M postal area.
Whittington Avenue, EC3V Whittington Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC3V postal area.
Winchester Square, SE1 Winchester Square is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Winchester Walk, SE1 Winchester Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Winchester Walk, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Winchester Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Byward Tower, 1893
TUM image id: 1556882285
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Hopton Street, Borough, 1977.
TUM image id: 1557142131
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Georg Giese from Danzig, 34-year-old German merchant at the Steelyard, painted in London by Hans Holbein in 1532
Credit: Hans Holbein
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Walbrook Wharf is an operating freight wharf located in the City of London adjacent to Cannon Street station.
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Etching of All Hallows Staining tower, drawn in 1922
Credit: Public domain
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The ’Walkie-Talkie’ (20 Fenchurch Street in the City of London), photographed in 2015. Shortly before completion, the angled windows set fire to a couple of vehicles when they focused the rays of the sun downwards into nearby streets. This quirk had to be fixed.
Credit: Wiki Commons/Colin
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Adelaide House from above
Credit: https://manchesterhistory.net/
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The shoemaker was a 1907 London comedy drama, a play "full of tears and laughter."
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At the south end of Philpot Lane, at its junction with Eastcheap in the City, is 23 Eastcheap, built between 1861 and 1862, as offices and warehousing for the spice-merchants Messrs.’ Hunt and Crombie. A curious feature adorns its facade - a carving of two brown mice, each of which is engaged in a struggle to wrest a large chunk of cheese from the jaws of the other.
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Lombard Court EC3
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Coffee house sign
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Tabard Inn, Southwark
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