The Crown

Pub in/near Notting Hill, existing between the 1850s and now

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(51.50852 -0.21033, 51.508 -0.21) 

The Crown

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Pub · * · W11 ·
July
27
2015

The Crown was situated at 57 Princedale Road.

This pub was established in 1851 and this magnificent photo was taken by a photographer from Maxilla Gardens, Notting Hill.

It featured in a couple of episodes of ’Minder’, which was filmed on location in this area.

This pub became a bar/restaurant called The Academy in 1987.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


The Crown</SPAN>

The Crown
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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Aubrey House Aubrey House is a large 18th-century detached house with two acres of gardens in the Campden Hill area of Holland Park.
Bangor Street (1911) Bangor Street was a street in Notting Dale which disappeared after the Second World War.
Corner of Bangor and Sirdar Road The location became the Dolphin Pub.
Earl of Zetland The Earl of Zetland - a pub in the Potteries
Kenilworth Castle The Kenilworth Castle was a post-war pub in Notting Dale.
Ladbroke Square Garden Ladbroke Square communal garden lies in Notting Hill.
Mary Place Workhouse Notting Dale Workhouse stood on the site of what is now Avondale Park Gardens,
St Anns Villas The effluent society
St John’s Hill St John’s Hill is the highest point in the area.
St John’s, Notting Hill St John’s Notting Hill is a Victorian Anglican church built in 1845 in Lansdowne Crescent, Notting Hill.
The Crown The Crown was situated at 57 Princedale Road.

NEARBY STREETS
Addison Avenue, W11 Addison Avenue runs north from Holland Park Avenue and was originally called Addison Road North.
Addison Place, W11 In the nineteenth century, Addison Place was known by two names - Phoenix Place and Crescent Mews East.
Ansleigh Place, W11 Ansleigh Place is an ex mews to the west of Notting Dale.
Aubrey Road, W8 Aubrey Road leads into Aubrey Walk, which runs west of Campden Hill Road at the top of Campden Hill. It was named in the 1840s.
Avondale Park Gardens, W11 Avondale Park Gardens, unlike other roads in the area, was developed in the 1920s when it was laid out on the former workhouse site.
Avondale Park Road, W11 Avondale Park Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Bangor Street, W11 Bangor Street, W11 was situated on the site of the modern Henry Dickens Court.
Boxmoor Street Boxmoor Street was also known as Henry Place and Beaumont Street during its brief life.
Boyne Terrace Mews, W11 Boyne Terrace Mews is a mews in Notting Hill, London W11.
Carlton Mansions, W14 Carlton Mansions is a street in West Kensington.
Clarendon Cross, W11 Clarendon Cross is a street in Notting Hill.
Clarendon Road, W11 Clarendon Road is one of the W11’s longest streets, running from Holland Park Avenue in the south to Dulford Street in the north.
Darnley Terrace, W11 Darnley Terrace is a street in Notting Hill.
Freston Road, W11 The southern end of Freston Road stretches over into the W11 postcode.
Frog Island, W12 Frog Island was the name of a lane leading north from the Uxbridge Road.
Gorham Place, W11 Gorham Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Hesketh Place, W11 Hesketh Place runs between Walmer Road and Avondale Park Road.
Hippodrome Mews, W11 Hippodrome Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Hippodrome Place, W11 Hippodrome Place was named after a lost racecourse of London.
Holland Park Avenue, W11 Holland Park Avenue is one of London’s most ancient thoroughfares.
Holland Park Gardens, W14 Holland Park Gardens is a street in West Kensington.
Holland Park Mews, W11 Holland Park Mews runs between the two branches of the road known as Holland Park.
Holland Park Roundabout, W11 Holland Park Roundabout is a road in the W12 postcode area
Holland Park Terrace, W11 Holland Park Terrace is a street in Notting Hill.
Holland Park, W11 The roads known as Holland Park consist of three main branches.
Holland Park, W11 Holland Park is a road in the W14 postcode area
Holland Walk, W8 Holland Walk is a street in Notting Hill.
Holland Walk, W8 Holland Walk is a street in Kensington.
Hume Road, W11 Hume Road ran from Norland Gardens to Norland Road.
Hunt Close, W11 Hunt Close is a street in Notting Hill.
Kenilworth Street, W11 Kenilworth Street was demolished just after the Second World War.
Kenley Street, W11 Kenley Street, W11 was originally William Street before it disappeared.
Kenley Walk, W11 Kenley Walk is a street in Notting Hill.
Kensington Park Gardens, W11 Kensington Park Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Kingsdale Gardens, W11 Kingsdale Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Ladbroke Square, W11 The huge Ladbroke Square communal garden is part communal garden accessed from the backs of the houses lining it and part traditional London Square with roads between the houses and the square.
Ladbroke Walk, W11 Ladbroke Walk, W11 is part of the Ladbroke Conversation Area.
Lansdowne Crescent, W11 Lansdowne Crescent has some of the most interesting and varied houses on the Ladbroke estate, as architects and builders experimented with different styles.
Lansdowne Mews, W11 Lansdowne Mews is a cul-de-sac in Notting Hill.
Lansdowne Rise, W11 Lansdowne Rise, W11 was originally called Montpelier Road.
Lansdowne Road, W11 Lansdowne Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Lansdowne Walk, W11 Lansdowne Walk was named after the Lansdowne area of Cheltenham.
Mary Place, W11 Mary Place connects Walmer Road with Sirdar Road.
Mortimer Square, W11 Mortimer Square is a street in Notting Hill.
Norland Place, W11 Norland Place began its life as Norland Stables.
Norland Road, W11 Norland Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Norland Square, W11 Norland Square is a street in Notting Hill.
Olaf Street, W11 Olaf Street is a street in Notting Hill.
Penzance Place, W11 Penzance Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Portland Gate, W11 Portland Gate is a road in the SW7 postcode area
Portland Road, W11 Portland Road is a street in Notting Hill, rich at one end and poor at the other.
Pottery Lane, W11 Pottery Lane takes its name from the brickfields which were situated at the northern end of the street.
Prince’s Yard, W11 This is a small cul-de-sac off of Princes Road.
Princedale Road, W11 Princedale Road was formerly Princes Road.
Princes Place, W11 Princes Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Queensdale Crescent, W11 Queensdale Crescent is a street in Notting Hill.
Queensdale Place, W11 Queensdale Place is a cul-de-sac which runs just off Queensdale Road.
Queensdale Road, W11 Queensdale Road is a long road stretching from west to east, containing terraces of Victorian houses.
Queensdale Walk, W11 Queensdale Walk is a small cul-de-sac with 2-storey cottages running south off Queensdale Road.
Rifle Place, W11 Rifle Place is a road in the W11 postcode area
Royal Crescent Mews, W11 Royal Crescent Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Royal Crescent, W11 The Royal Crescent is a Grade II* listed street in Holland Park.
Runcorn Place, W11 Runcorn Place was once Thomas Place, and before even that ’The Mews’.
Saunders Grove, W11 Saunders Grove ran east from Norland Gardens.
Sirdar Road, W11 Sirdar Road is a street in Notting Hill.
St Anns Road, W11 St Anns Road, along with St Anns Villas, runs north from Royal Crescent.
St Anns Villas, W11 St Ann’s Villas, leading into Royal Crescent, is a pleasant tree-lined if busy road.
St James’s Gardens, W11 St James’s Gardens is an attractive garden square with St James Church in the middle of the communal garden.
St John’s Gardens, W11 St John’s Gardens runs around St John’s church.
Stanley Crescent, W11 Stanley Crescent was named after Edward Stanley.
Stanley Gardens, W11 Stanley Gardens was built in the 1850s.
Stoneleigh Place, W11 Stoneleigh Place, formerly called Abbey Road, was built across a brickfield in Notting Dale.
Stoneleigh Street, W11 Stoneleigh Street runs between Treadgold Street and Stoneleigh Place.
Swanscombe House, W11 Residential block
Swanscombe Road, W11 Swanscombe Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Testerton Walk, W11 Testerton Walk is a street in Notting Hill.
Treadgold Street, W11 Treadgold Street is part of the Avondale Park Gardens Conservation Area.
Walmer Road, W11 Walmer Road is the oldest street in the area, dating from the eighteenth century or before.
Wilby Mews, W11 Wilby Mews was named after Benjamin Wilby, who was involved in several 19th century development schemes.
Wilsham Street, W11 Wilsham Street was formerly known as St Katherine’s Road.
Woodsford Square, W14 Woodsford Square is a 1970s development consisting of a series of interconnecting squares hidden away on the eastern side of Addison Road.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Coronation street party, 1953.
TUM image id: 1545250697
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Children of Ruston Close
TUM image id: 1545251090
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Kensington Park Hotel
TUM image id: 1453375720
Licence: CC BY 2.0
201311211613
TUM image id: 1453376699
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Oxford Gardens, W10
Old London postcard
TUM image id: 1563716750
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Martin Street, looking west (1960s)
TUM image id: 1604228974
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Addison Place
Credit: Google Maps
TUM image id: 1457274476
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Ansleigh Place, W11
TUM image id: 1453967815
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Arundel Gardens
Credit: Barbara Avis
TUM image id: 1453911014
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Boyne Terrace Mews, W11
TUM image id: 1453967964
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Children of Ruston Close
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Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Tile Kiln, Notting Dale (1824)
Credit: Florence Gladstone
TUM image id: 1563720078
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Addison Place
Credit: Google Maps
TUM image id: 1457274476
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Ansleigh Place, W11
TUM image id: 1453967815
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Arundel Gardens
Credit: Barbara Avis
TUM image id: 1453911014
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Boyne Terrace Mews, W11
TUM image id: 1453967964
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Hippodrome Place street sign
TUM image id: 1491749319
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Holland Park Avenue c.1900, looking west. Old postcard, reproduced courtesy of RBKC.
Credit: Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea
TUM image id: 1443739065
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Lansdowne Crescent, W11
TUM image id: 1453888171
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No. 6 (in the foreground) and No. 5 Lansdowne Mews in 2006, with Green’s Court beyond
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