An introduction to Hampstead by G.E. Mitton (1902)

This text originates from "The Fascination of Hampstead" by Geraldine Edith Mitton (published 1902)

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Article · Hampstead · NW3 ·
FEBRUARY
19
2016

This text originates from "The Fascination of Hampstead" by Geraldine Edith Mitton (published 1902)

The name of this borough is clearly derived from "ham," or "hame," a home; and "steede," a place, and has consequently the same meaning as homestead. Park, in a note in his book on Hampstead, says that the "p" is a modern interpolation, scarcely found before the seventeenth century, and not in general use until the eighteenth.

Lysons says that the Manor of Hampstead was given in 986 a.d. by King Ethelred to the church at Westminster, and that this gift was confirmed by Edward the Confessor; but there is an earlier charter of King Edgar of uncertain date, probably between 963 and 978. It granted the land at Hamstede to one Mangoda, and the limits of the grant are thus stated: "From Sandgate along the road to Foxhanger; from the Hanger west to Watling Street north along the street to the Cucking Pool; from the Cucking Pool east to Sandgate."

Professor Hales, who thinks, whether genuine or not, this charter is certainly of value, interprets Sandgate as North End, Foxhanger as Haverstock Hill, Watling Street as Edgeware Road, and the Cucking Pool he concludes was in the marshy ground at the north-west corner of the parish.

This earlier charter is only interesting because it carries the history one point further back; the gift to the monks by King Ethelred was in its consequences far more important. The Bishop of Westminster, who held the land after the dissolution of the monastery, surrendered it to the King in 1550, by whom it was given to Sir Thomas Wroth. It remained in the Wroth family until 1620, when it was acquired by Sir Baptist Hickes, afterwards Viscount Campden. Hickes’ daughter and coheir married Lord Noel, ancestor of the Earls of Gainsborough, and it was held by the Gainsboroughs until 1707. In that year it was bought by Sir William Langhorne, who left it to his nephew. It then went to a Mrs. Margaret Maryon, later to Mrs. Weller, and about 1780 to Sir Thomas Spencer Wilson, in right of his wife. Her son, Sir Thomas Maryon Wilson, succeeded her, and in this line it has remained since 1818.
Besides the Manor of Hampstead there is included in the borough the ancient Manor of Belsize, or Belses. Sir Roger de Brabazon in 1317 gave an estate to Westminster Abbey to found a chantry for himself, Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, and Blanche his wife. After many changes it was occupied by Lord Wotton, who had been created a Baron by Charles II. His half-brother, Philip, Earl of Chesterfield, succeeded him, and the family held the Belsize estate until 1807. The house was afterwards turned into a popular place of amusement.

Hampstead as a whole has grown very rapidly. In a map of the beginning of the nineteenth century there are comparatively few houses; these nestle in the shape of a spear-head and haft about the High Street. At West End and Fortune Green are a few more, a few straggle up the southern end of the Kilburn Road, and Rosslyn House and Belsize House are detached, out in the open country.
Seymour, writing in 1735, gives a quaint description of Hampstead as follows: "This Village ... is much more frequented by good company than can well be expected considering its vicinity to London, but such care has been taken to discourage the meaner sort from making it a place of residence that it is now become, after Scarborough and Bath and Tunbridge, one of the Politest Public Places in England, and to add to the Entertainment of the Company there is, besides the long room in which the Company meet publicly on a Monday evening to play at cards, etc., a new Dancing Room built this year."

Hampstead itself, now a town of 80,000 people, is almost entirely modern; the old village has been gradually destroyed until there is next to nothing left. But the Heath remains, the only wild piece of ground within easy reach of the Londoner. It remains to be seen whether the authorities will continue to observe the difference between a park and a heath.

No suburb of London can point to so many distinguished residents as this, the most favoured and the most favourite. Among them may be mentioned Sir Henry Vane, Dr. Butler (author of the "Analogy"), Lord Alvanley, Lord Chatham, Lord Erskine, Crabbe, Dr. Johnson, Joanna Baillie, Mrs. Barbauld, Constable, Romney, Sir James Mackintosh, Steele, Gay, Arbuthnot, Akenside, Thomas Day, Leigh Hunt, Keats, William Blake, John Linnell, Wilkie, Stanfield, Du Maurier, and many others.


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Lived here
Cassandra Green   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 14:34 GMT   

Rudall Crescent, NW3 (- 1999)
I lived at 2 Rudall Crescent until myself and my family moved out in 1999. I once met a lady in a art fair up the road who was selling old photos of the area and was very knowledgeable about the area history, collecting photos over the years. She told me that before the current houses were built, there was a large manor house , enclosed by a large area of land. She told me there had been a fire there. Im trying to piece together the story and find out what was on the land before the crescent was built. This website is very interesting.

Reply

James Preston   
Added: 28 Apr 2021 09:06 GMT   

School
Was this the location of Rosslyn House prep school? I have a photograph of the Rosslyn House cricket team dated 1910 which features my grandfather (Alan Westbury Preston). He would have been 12 years old at the time. All the boys on the photo have been named. If this is the location of the school then it appears that the date of demolition is incorrect.

Reply
Comment
Graham Margetson   
Added: 9 Feb 2021 14:33 GMT   

I lived at 4 Arkwright Road before it was the school
My parents lived at 4 Arkwright Road. Mrs Goodwin actually owned the house and my parents rented rooms from her.


Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 10 Dec 2020 23:51 GMT   

Wellgarth Road, NW11
I lived at 15 Wellgarth Road with my parents and family from 1956 until I left home in the 70s and continued to visit my mother there until she moved in the early 80s. On the first day we moved in we kids raced around the garden and immediately discovered an air raid shelter that ran right underneath the house which I assume was added in the run-up to WW2. There was a basement room with its own entrance off the garden and right opposite where the air raid shelter emerged. In no time at all up high near the ceiling of this room, we discovered a door which, while we were little enough, we could enter by standing on some item of furniture, haul ourselves in and hide from the grownups. That room was soundproof enough for us kids to make a racket if we wanted to. But not too loud if my dad was playing billiards in the amazing wood-panelled room immediately above. We had no idea that we were living in such an historical building. To us it was just fun - and home!

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Bob Land   
Added: 29 Jun 2022 13:20 GMT   

Map legends
Question, I have been looking at quite a few maps dated 1950 and 1900, and there are many abbreviations on the maps, where can I find the lists to unravel these ?

Regards

Bob Land

Reply
Comment
Alison   
Added: 26 Jun 2022 18:20 GMT   

On the dole in north London
When I worked at the dole office in Medina Road in the 1980s, "Archway" meant the social security offices which were in Archway Tower at the top of the Holloway Road. By all accounts it was a nightmare location for staff and claimants alike. This was when Margaret Thatcher’s government forced unemployment to rise to over 3 million (to keep wages down) and computerised records where still a thing of the future. Our job went from ensuring that unemployed people got the right sort and amount of benefits at the right time, to stopping as many people as possible from getting any sort of benefit at all. Britain changed irrevocably during this period and has never really recovered. We lost the "all in it together" frame of mind that had been born during the second world war and became the dog-eat-dog society where 1% have 95% of the wealth and many people can’t afford to feed their children. For me, the word Archway symbolises the land of lost content.

Reply
Comment
Jack Wilson   
Added: 21 Jun 2022 21:40 GMT   

Penfold Printers
I am seeking the location of Penfold Printers Offices in Dt Albans place - probably about 1870 or so

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 19 Jun 2022 16:58 GMT   

Runcorn Place, W11
Runcorn place

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 30 May 2022 19:03 GMT   

The Three Magpies
Row of houses (centre) was on Heathrow Rd....Ben’s Cafe shack ( foreground ) and the Three Magpies pub (far right) were on the Bath Rd

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Comment
Watts   
Added: 17 May 2022 20:29 GMT   

Baeethoven St School, also an Annex for Paddington College of FE.
In the early 70’s I took a two year science course at Paddington CFE. The science classes were held on weekday evenings at Beethoven Street school, overseen by chemistry teacher, Mr Tattershall.

Reply

   
Added: 25 Apr 2022 22:11 GMT   

Southover, N12
Everyone knows Central Woodside is the place to be. Ever since kdog moved from finchtown, Woodside has been thriving.

Reply
Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
6 Ellerdale Road 6 Ellerdale Road is a house built by the Arts and Crafts movement architect Richard Norman Shaw for himself in the period 1874 to 1876.
An introduction to Hampstead by G.E. Mitton (1902) This text originates from "The Fascination of Hampstead" by Geraldine Edith Mitton (published 1902)
Hampstead Hampstead though now considered an integral part of London, has retained much of its village charm.
Hampstead station (1907) Hampstead station pictured at its opening in 1907
Hampstead Town This article first appeared in ’A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 9, Hampstead, Paddington’.
Piecemeal building The infant River Westbourne crossed, what in 1900, was still a boggy field.
River Westbourne The easternmost branch of the River Westbourne rises just south of the centre of Hampstead,
Rosslyn Hill Unitarian Chapel The Rosslyn Hill Unitarian Chapel is a place of worship and a member of the General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches, the umbrella organisation for British Unitarians.
St John, Hampstead St John-at-Hampstead is a Church of England parish church dedicated to St John the Evangelist.
St Mary’s Church St Mary’s Chapel, now known as St Mary’s Church, is a Grade II* listed Roman Catholic church.
The Royal School, Hampstead The Royal School, Hampstead, was an independent girls’ day and boarding school. The school educated girls aged 3-16.
University College School University College School, generally known as UCS, is an independent school charity situated in northwest London.

NEARBY STREETS
Admiral’s Walk, NW3 Admiral’s Walk extends from Hampstead Grove to Lower Terrace.
Back Lane, NW3 Back Lane runs from Heath Street to Flask Walk.
Birchwood Drive, NW3 Birchwood Drive is a street in Hampstead.
Branch Hill, NW3 Branch Hill is a street in Hampstead.
Cannon Lane, NW3 Cannon Lane is a road in the NW3 postcode area
Cannon Place, NW3 Cannon Place is a road in the NW3 postcode area
Carlingford Road, NW3 Carlingford Road runs between Pilgrim’s Lane and Willoughby Road.
Carnegie House, NW3 Residential block
Chesterford Gardens, NW3 Chesterford Gardens is a street in Hampstead.
Christ Church, NW3 Christ Church is a street in Hampstead.
Christchurch Hill, NW3 Christchurch Hill is a street in Hampstead.
Christchurch Passage, NW3 Christchurch Passage is a location in London.
Church Row, NW3 Church Row is a street in Hampstead.
Coach House Yard, NW3 Coach House Yard is a street in Hampstead.
Denning Road, NW3 Denning Road is a street in Hampstead.
Downshire Hill, NW3 Downshire Hill is a street in Hampstead.
East Heath Road, NW3 East Heath Road bounds the western rim of Hampstead Heath.
Ellerdale Close, NW3 Ellerdale Close is a street in Hampstead.
Ellerdale Road, NW3 Ellerdale Road was added to the streetscape of Hampstead in 1874.
Elm Row, NW3 Elm Row is a road in the NW3 postcode area
Falcon Lodge, NW3 Falcon Lodge is a street in Hampstead.
Fitzjohn’s Avenue, NW3 Fitzjohn’s Avenue links Hampstead with Swiss Cottage.
Flask Cottages, NW3 Flask Cottages is a street in Hampstead.
Flask Walk, NW3 Flask Walk is a street in Hampstead.
Frognal Close, NW3 Frognal Close is a street in Hampstead.
Frognal Gardens, NW3 This is a street in the NW3 postcode area
Frognal Lane, NW3 Frognal Lane is a street in Hampstead.
Frognal Rise, NW3 Frognal Rise is a road in the NW3 postcode area
Frognal Way, NW3 Frognal Way is a street in Hampstead.
Gainsborough Gardens, NW3 Gainsborough Gardens is a road in the NW3 postcode area
Gardnor Road, NW3 Gardnor Road is a street in Hampstead.
Gayton Crescent, NW3 Gayton Crescent is a street in Hampstead.
Gayton Road, NW3 Gayton Road is a street in Hampstead.
Grayton Crescent, NW3 Grayton Crescent is a location in London.
Greenhill, NW3 Greenhill is a street in Hampstead.
Grove Place, NW3 Grove Place is a street in Hampstead.
Hampstead Grove, NW3 Hampstead Grove is a road in the NW3 postcode area
Hampstead High Street, NW3 Hampstead High Street is a street in Hampstead.
Hampstead Square, NW3 Hampstead Square is a street in Hampstead.
Heath Side, NW3 Heath Side is a road in the NW3 postcode area
Heath Street, NW3 Heath Street is a street in Hampstead.
Heysham Lane, NW3 Heysham Lane is a road in the NW3 postcode area
Holford Road, NW3 This is a street in the NW3 postcode area
Holly Berry Lane, NW3 Holly Berry Lane is a street in Hampstead.
Holly Bush Hill, NW3 Holly Bush Hill is a location in London.
Holly Bush Vale, NW3 Holly Bush Vale is a street in Hampstead.
Holly Hill, NW3 Holly Hill is a street in Hampstead.
Holly Mount, NW3 Holly Mount is a street in Hampstead.
Holly Walk, NW3 Holly Walk connects Holly Hill with Church Row.
Hollyberry Lane, NW3 Hollyberry Lane is a location in London.
Judges’ Walk, NW3 Judges’ Walk is a road in the NW3 postcode area
Kemplay Road, NW3 Kemplay Road is a street in Hampstead.
Lakis Close, NW3 Lakis Close is a street in Hampstead.
Langland Crescent, HA7 Langland Crescent is a location in London.
Langland Gardens, NW3 Langland Gardens is a street in Hampstead.
Lime Avenue, NW3 A named road at its East Heath Road end, Lime Avenue as a pathway stretches across Hampstead Heath.
Lower Terrace, NW3 Lower Terrace is a road in the NW3 postcode area
Mount Vernon, NW3 Mount Vernon is a road in the NW3 postcode area
Mulberry Close, NW3 Mulberry Close is a location in London.
New End Square, NW3 New End Square is a street in Hampstead.
New End, NW3 New End is a street in Hampstead.
Oak Hill Park Mews, NW3 Oak Hill Park Mews first appears on the 1900 map.
Oak Hill Park Mews, NW3 Oak Hill Park Mews is a street in Hampstead.
Oak Hill Park, NW3 Oak Hill Park is a street in Hampstead.
Oak Hill Way, NW3 Oak Hill Way is a street in Hampstead.
Old Brewery Mews, NW3 Old Brewery Mews is a street in Hampstead.
Oriel Court, NW3 Oriel Court is a street in Hampstead.
Oriel Place, NW3 Oriel Place is a street in Hampstead.
Perrin’s Lane, NW3 This is a street in the NW3 postcode area
Perrins Court, NW3 Perrins Court is a street in Hampstead.
Perrins Walk, NW3 Perrins Walk is a street in Hampstead.
Pilgrim’s Lane, NW3 This is a street in the NW3 postcode area
Pilgrim’s Place, NW3 This is a street in the NW3 postcode area
Pilgrims Place, NW3 Pilgrims Place is a street in Hampstead.
Prince Arthur Mews, NW3 Prince Arthur Mews is a street in Hampstead.
Prince Arthur Road, NW3 Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn and son of Queen Victoria opened a home for sailor’s daughters in the area in 1869.
Rosslyn Mews, NW3 Rosslyn Mews is a street in Hampstead.
Rudall Crescent, NW3 Rudall Crescent was laid out by a builder John Culverhouse in 1878.
Shepherd’s Path, NW3 Shepherd?s Path is a street in Hampstead.
Shepherd’s Path, NW3 Shepherd’s Path is a road in the NW3 postcode area
Shepherds Walk, NW3 Shepherds Walk is a street in Hampstead.
Spedan Close, NW3 Spedan Close was the site of an innovative council housing scheme.
Squire’s Mount, NW3 Squire’s Mount leads south off of East Heath Road.
Streatley Place, NW3 Streatley Place is a street in Hampstead.
The Mount, NW3 The Mount is a road in the NW3 postcode area
The Wells House, NW3 The Wells House is a block on Well Walk
Thurlow Road, NW3 Thurlow Road is a street in Hampstead.
Tower Close, NW3 Tower Close is a location in London.
Upper Terrace, NW3 Upper Terrace is a road in the NW3 postcode area
Vane Close, NW3 Vane Close is a street in Hampstead.
Village Close, NW3 Village Close is a location in London.
Village Mount, NW3 Village Mount is a street in Hampstead.
Well Passage, NW3 Well Passage links Well Road and Well Walk in Hampstead.
Well Road, NW3 Well Road is a street in Hampstead.
Well Walk, NW3 Well Walk is a street in Hampstead.
Willoughby Road, NW3 Willoughby Road is a street in Hampstead.
Willow Road, NW3 Willow Road is a street in Hampstead.
Windmill Hill, NW3 Windmill Hill is a street in Hampstead.
Yorkshire Grey Place, NW3 Yorkshire Grey Place is a street in Hampstead.

NEARBY PUBS
King William IV This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Duke of Hamilton This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Flask This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Holly Bush This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Horse Shoe This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Wells Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Ye Olde White Bear This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Hampstead

Hampstead though now considered an integral part of London, has retained much of its village charm.

Hampstead is on a steep hill and the tube station platforms are the deepest on the London Underground network, at 58.5 metres below ground level. It has the deepest lift shaft on the Underground.

Although early records of Hampstead itself can be found in a grant by King Ethelred the Unready to the monastery of St. Peter's at Westminster (AD 986) and it is referred to in the Domesday Book (1086), the history of Hampstead is generally traced back to the 17th century.

Trustees of the Well started advertising the medicinal qualities of the chalybeate waters (water impregnated with iron) in 1700. Although Hampstead Wells was initially successful, its popularity declined in the 1800s due to competition with other London spas. The spa was demolished in 1882, although a water fountain was left behind.

Hampstead started to expand following the opening of the North London Railway in the 1860s (now on the London Overground), and expanded further after the tube station opened in 1907.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Victorian house under construction
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Belsize Avenue in Belsize Park
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Church Row, NW3
TUM image id: 1546470373
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Holly Walk, NW3
TUM image id: 1455451397
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Frognal, NW3
Credit: Google Maps
TUM image id: 1557403884
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Wedderburn Road, NW3
TUM image id: 1452676133
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Yorkshire Grey Place, NW3
TUM image id: 1456946471
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Whitestone Pond (1900s)
TUM image id: 1484920765
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Church Row, NW3
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In the neighbourhood...

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Victorian house under construction
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At Hampstead Heath station, a Stratford bound Overground train emerges from Hampstead Tunnel - the other end of the tunnel can be seen behind the oncoming train.
Credit: nick86235
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Soldier’s Daughters Home from the "Illustrated London News", June 19, 1858
Credit: The Illustrated London News
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Heath House, Hampstead
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Church Row, NW3
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Holly Walk, NW3
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Spedan Close
Credit: municipaldreams.wordpress.com
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Frognal, NW3
Credit: Google Maps
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Wedderburn Road, NW3
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Yorkshire Grey Place, NW3
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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