Theobald Street, Borehamwood, Herts.

Road in/near Borehamwood, existing between 1776 and now

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Road · Borehamwood · WD6 ·
JUNE
6
2017

Theobald Street runs from the centre of Borehamwood to the centre of Radlett.

Theobald Street was, until the twentieth century, the high street of Borehamwood. Shops ran along the street between the Crown pub and Brickfield Cottages but only with the arrival of the film industry did Shenley Road begin to take over this function.

The "street" part of the name is derived from an often-used Hertfordshire term for a hamlet which lies on a long road - other examples are Colney Street and, more locally, Green Street. In modern times the street was named after that of the hamlet - this is the reason it is a ’street’ rather than a ’lane’, despite its rural setting.

Theobald Street was, were created as a result of the Enclosure Act of 1776, whereby Boreham Wood Common was divided up amongst various landowners.

While associated more now with Borehamwood, the hamlet of Theobald Street lay nearer what is now Radlett and indeed was a former alternative name for Radlett. In 1718 the bridge over a stream between Radlett and Colney Street - called High Bridge - was sometimes described as being in the hamlet of Theobald Street. The line of Theobald Street south from Radlett was at first just a footpath.

Before the name settled into the modern form, Theobald Street was also called Tiberstreet, Tibure Street, Theebald Street, and Tyteburst Street. In the Domesday Book it was called Titeberst.

Elstree, the oldest part of the parish, came into the possession of St Albans Abbey in 1188, when it was known as Tidulfes Treow and Borehamwood as Bosci di Borham. Both names have undergone various changes and spellings over the centuries, and many older residents still prefer to spell Boreham Wood as two words.

Older local roads, including Barnet Lane, Furzehill Road, Shenley Road, Allum Lane and the Borehamwood end of Theobald Street, were created as a result of the Enclosure Act of 1776, whereby the 684 acres of Borehamwood Common were divided up amongst various landowners, including the Church, and in return new roads were laid out which were to be sixty feet wide including verges.

By Victorian times this part of the Parish consisted of little more than a hamlet, clustered around Theobald Street, north of the junction with Shenley Road, and surrounded by farms.

A shopping parade on the east of the street was built in 1871, and once known as Robinson’s Folly. Its builder, Robinson - the footbridge over the railway was also named after him - was ridiculed at the time for his ’follies’ but some 150 years later, his shops are still here.



A small school opened at 27a Theobald Street in 1896. Since the introduction of the Education Act in 1870, making it compulsory for children under the age of ten to go to school, another building down the road at number 35 had been used as a temporary infants’ school for the area. Older pupils had to walk to the Elstree National School or Medburn Boys’ School, which was on the route to Radlett.

In 1896, 27a Theobald Street was erected. It is thought to have been constructed using bricks mined from a quarry off Deacons Hill Road, in Elstree. The building was also used by Elstree and Borehamwood Town Council, for meetings in the early 20th century.

The Old Crown - north of the later Crown pub - dates back to at least 1769 although rebuilt in the late 1800s.

A war memorial was placed at the junction of Theobald Street and Shenley Road. It was dedicated on 20 October 1921. Before that, an animal pound with a pond stood close to the site and stray farm animals would be left there for collection by their owners.

Before World War Two, there were Nissen Huts which housed troops from the Royal Ordinance Corps on the site later occupied by the Kinetic Business Centre. The troops did some of their training in the film studios.

The growth of Borehamwood proceeded rapidly in the 1940s and 1950s. It was reported that Elstree Rural District Council built 1500 homes between 1945 and 1956, the London County Council 2700 homes, and 550 private dwellings were constructed. In 1957-8, the War Memorial moved from Theobald Street to the Elstree Way end of Shenley Road. A number of residential properties still remained in Shenley Road and some residents still talk of ‘going down the village’ when referring to this shopping centre. Shenley Road by then had taken over completely from Theobald Street as the centre of the growing town.


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
norma brown   
Added: 20 Aug 2021 21:12 GMT   

my grandparents lived there as well as 2 further generations
my home

Reply

Irene Smith   
Added: 30 Jun 2017 15:46 GMT   

Keystone Passage, WD6
My mother worked at Keystones in the 1940s before she was married.

She later worked at home which a lot of people did. You would often see people walking around Boreham Wood with boxes filled with piecework for the factory.

Reply
Comment
Colin Trotman   
Added: 28 Oct 2020 14:35 GMT   

Old Red Lion
I feel your suggestion that the Old Red Lion on Green Street was ’demolished in 1962’ is incorrect; I was born in Borehamwood in 1957, and remember it well - must have therefore still been there in the mid sixties at least.

Reply
Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 24 Nov 2020 14:02 GMT   

Red Lion demolition
There were two pubs in Green Street. While our source of information may be incorrect, the second one we think DID last until the late 1960s as Patrick McGoohan drank there while creating ’The Prisoner’

Reply
Comment
Fion Anderson   
Added: 2 Nov 2021 12:55 GMT   

Elstree not Borehamwood
Home of the UK film industry

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Alison   
Added: 26 Jun 2022 18:20 GMT   

On the dole in north London
When I worked at the dole office in Medina Road in the 1980s, "Archway" meant the social security offices which were in Archway Tower at the top of the Holloway Road. By all accounts it was a nightmare location for staff and claimants alike. This was when Margaret Thatcher’s government forced unemployment to rise to over 3 million (to keep wages down) and computerised records where still a thing of the future. Our job went from ensuring that unemployed people got the right sort and amount of benefits at the right time, to stopping as many people as possible from getting any sort of benefit at all. Britain changed irrevocably during this period and has never really recovered. We lost the "all in it together" frame of mind that had been born during the second world war and became the dog-eat-dog society where 1% have 95% of the wealth and many people can’t afford to feed their children. For me, the word Archway symbolises the land of lost content.

Reply
Comment
Jack Wilson   
Added: 21 Jun 2022 21:40 GMT   

Penfold Printers
I am seeking the location of Penfold Printers Offices in Dt Albans place - probably about 1870 or so

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 19 Jun 2022 16:58 GMT   

Runcorn Place, W11
Runcorn place

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 30 May 2022 19:03 GMT   

The Three Magpies
Row of houses (centre) was on Heathrow Rd....Ben’s Cafe shack ( foreground ) and the Three Magpies pub (far right) were on the Bath Rd

Reply
Comment
Watts   
Added: 17 May 2022 20:29 GMT   

Baeethoven St School, also an Annex for Paddington College of FE.
In the early 70’s I took a two year science course at Paddington CFE. The science classes were held on weekday evenings at Beethoven Street school, overseen by chemistry teacher, Mr Tattershall.

Reply

   
Added: 25 Apr 2022 22:11 GMT   

Southover, N12
Everyone knows Central Woodside is the place to be. Ever since kdog moved from finchtown, Woodside has been thriving.

Reply
Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

Reply

Brian Lynch   
Added: 10 Apr 2022 13:38 GMT   

Staples Mattress Factory
An architect’s design of the Staples Mattress Factory
An image found on the website of Dalzell’s Beds, in Armagh Northern Ireland.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
105 Shenley Road, WD6 105 Shenley Road lies along the main street of Borehamwood.
27A Theobald Street 27a Theobald Street was once Boreham Wood’s first purpose-built school.
66 Shenley Road, WD6 66 Shenley Road used to lie on the corner of Furzehill Road.
68 Shenley Road 68 Shenley Road was a shop on the corner of Furzehill Road - now disappeared.
Boreham Wood Baptist Church The Baptist Church, situated on the corner of Furzehill Road, opened on 14 July 1911.
Buses in Shenley Road A 292 and 358 in Shenley Road.
Fox and Clark Furniture Shop (1905) The Fox and Clark Furniture Shop was situated at 73 Shenley Road, Boreham Wood.
Shenley Road (1930s) Shenley Road, Borehamwood in the 1930s
The Myriad Stores Added photo for 49 Shenley Road, WD6

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NEARBY PUBS
Borehamwood Social Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Borehamwood

Borehamwood is a town of approximately 30 000 residents in southern Hertfordshire, just outside London, and part of the London commuter belt.

Borehamwood, more commonly called Boreham Wood before the LCC estate was built, is part of the borough of Hertsmere. The town is often associated with the nearby village Elstree (being part of the ancient parish of Elstree), the two still share a local council, now called the Elstree and Borehamwood Town Council.

The A1 passes just to the east of the town, and the M25 passes about two miles north of it.

Since the 1920s, the town has been the location of several film studios. The former British National Studios on Clarendon Road are now the BBC’s Elstree Television Studios. One of BBC’s popular soaps, EastEnders, is produced at the BBC studios, as well as popular medical drama Holby City. ’Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?’, ’Big Brother’ and major feature films are filmed at the Elstree Studios in Shenley Road.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Aberford Park lake
TUM image id: 1557403472
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Fox and Clark’ Furniture Shop (1905)
TUM image id: 1469393744
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Meryfield crest
TUM image id: 1526568929
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Brickfield Cottages, Boreham Wood
TUM image id: 1556883123
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Clarendon Road, WD6
TUM image id: 1469027977
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Leeming Road, WD6
TUM image id: 1469035628
Licence: CC BY 2.0
1 Shenley Road, WD6
TUM image id: 1469916137
Licence: CC BY 2.0
7 Shenley Road, WD6
TUM image id: 1469394829
Licence: CC BY 2.0
35 Shenley Road, WD6
TUM image id: 1469322616
Licence: CC BY 2.0
39 Shenley Road, WD6
TUM image id: 1469362240
Licence:

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Napoleon’s Death Mask, made in 1821 by Barham House resident, Francis Burton M.D., the uncle of explorer Richard Francis Burton
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Aberford Park lake
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Richard Lidstone draper's shop on the corner of Shenley Road and Fuzehill Road (early 1900s)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Junction of Shenley Road and Drayton Road (1930s)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Meryfield crest
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Brickfield Cottages, Boreham Wood
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Watercolour of the lower part of Theobald Street.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


1 Shenley Road, WD6
Licence: CC BY 2.0


7 Shenley Road, WD6
Licence: CC BY 2.0


35 Shenley Road, WD6
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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