Keysham Court, HA9

Road in/near Preston Road

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(51.565111 -0.292711, 51.565 -0.292) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · Preston Road · HA9 ·
December
16
2020

Keysham Court is a location in London.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

None so far :(
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply
Lived here
David James Bloomfield   
Added: 13 Jul 2021 11:54 GMT   

Hurstway Street, W10
Jimmy Bloomfield who played for Arsenal in the 1950s was brought up on this street. He was a QPR supporter as a child, as many locals would be at the time, as a teen he was rejected by them as being too small. They’d made a mistake

Reply
Comment
Added: 6 Jul 2021 05:38 GMT   

Wren Road in the 1950s and 60s
Living in Grove Lane I knew Wren Road; my grandfather’s bank, Lloyds, was on the corner; the Scout District had their office in the Congregational Church and the entrance to the back of the Police station with the stables and horses was off it. Now very changed - smile.

Reply

fariba   
Added: 28 Jun 2021 00:48 GMT   

Tower Bridge Business Complex, S
need for my coursework

Source: university

Reply
Lived here
Kim Johnson   
Added: 24 Jun 2021 19:17 GMT   

Limehouse Causeway (1908)
My great grandparents were the first to live in 15 Tomlins Terrace, then my grandparents and parents after marriage. I spent the first two years of my life there. My nan and her family lived at number 13 Tomlins Terrace. My maternal grandmother lived in Maroon house, Blount Street with my uncle. Nan, my mum and her brothers were bombed out three times during the war.

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Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Forty Farm Forty Farm was situated where the Sudbury to Kingsbury road crossed the Lidding at Forty Bridge.

NEARBY STREETS
Ashley Gardens, HA9 Ashley Gardens is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Aylands Close, HA9 Aylands Close is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Balmoral Court, HA9 Balmoral Court is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Barnhill Road, HA9 Barnhill Road is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Beechcroft Gardens, HA9 Beechcroft Gardens is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Blackbird Hill, HA9 Blackbird Hill is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Blenheim Gardens, HA9 Blenheim Gardens is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Bowling Green Court, HA9 Bowling Green Court is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Chamberlayne Avenue, HA9 Chamberlayne Avenue is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Courtenay Road, HA9 Courtenay Road is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Crown Green Mews, HA9 Crown Green Mews is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Crown Walk, HA9 Crown Walk is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Draycott Avenue, HA9 Draycott Avenue is a road in the HA9 postcode area
East Lane, HA9 East Lane is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Edison Drive, HA9 Edison Drive is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Elmstead Avenue, HA9 Elmstead Avenue is a road in the HA9 postcode area
First Avenue, HA9 First Avenue is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Forty Avenue, HA9 Forty Avenue is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Forty Close, HA9 Forty Close is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Forty Lane, HA9 Forty Lane is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Fryent Way, HA9 Fryent Way is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Gabrielle Close, HA9 Gabrielle Close is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Greenhill, HA9 Greenhill is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Greenrigg Walk, HA9 Greenrigg Walk is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Hannah Close, HA9 Hannah Close is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Harrow Road, HA9 Harrow Road is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Harrowdene Road, HA9 Harrowdene Road is a road in the HA9 postcode area
High Road, HA9 High Road is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Highfield Avenue, HA9 Highfield Avenue is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Hirst Crescent, HA9 Hirst Crescent is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Hollycroft Avenue, HA9 Hollycroft Avenue is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Hutchinson Terrace, HA9 Hutchinson Terrace is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Ken Way, HA9 Ken Way is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Kinch Grove, HA9 Kinch Grove is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Lambert Walk, HA9 Lambert Walk is a location in London.
Lockier Walk, HA9 A street within the HA9 postcode
Logan Road, HA9 Logan Road is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Lovett Way, HA9 Lovett Way is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Magnet Road East Lane Business Park, HA9 Magnet Road East Lane Business Park is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Magnet Road, HA9 Magnet Road is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Nathans Road, HA9 Nathans Road is a road in the HA9 postcode area
North Circular Road, HA9 North Circular Road is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Northwick Avenue, HA9 Northwick Avenue is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Oakington Avenue, HA9 Oakington Avenue is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Old High Street, HA9 Old High Street is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Osram Road, HA9 Osram Road is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Peel Road, HA9 Peel Road is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Pellatt Road, HA9 Pellatt Road is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Pendolino Way, HA9 Pendolino Way is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Poplar View, HA9 Poplar View is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Preston Road, HA9 Preston Road is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Quad Road, HA9 Quad Road is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Rainborough Close, HA9 Rainborough Close is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Richmond Court, HA9 Richmond Court is a location in London.
Rosslyn Gardens, HA9 Rosslyn Gardens is a location in London.
Silverbox House, HA9 Silverbox House is a location in London.
St Augustines Avenue, HA9 St Augustines Avenue is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
St. Augustines Avenue, HA9 St. Augustines Avenue is a location in London.
Station Grove, HA9 Station Grove is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Talisman Way, HA9 Talisman Way is a road in the HA9 postcode area
The Broadway, HA9 The Broadway is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
The Fairway, HA9 The Fairway is a road in the HA9 postcode area
The Martins, HA9 A street within the HA9 postcode
Tilling Way, HA9 Tilling Way is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Toley Avenue, HA9 Toley Avenue is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Uxendon Crescent, HA9 Uxendon Crescent is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Walton Gardens, HA9 Walton Gardens is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Warren Close, HA9 Warren Close is a location in London.
Wembley Commercial Centre, HA9 Wembley Commercial Centre is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Wembley Park Drive, HA9 Wembley Park Drive is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Windermere Avenue, HA9 Windermere Avenue is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Windermere Court, HA9 Windermere Court is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Winthrop Walk, HA9 Winthrop Walk is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.

NEARBY PUBS
The Copper Jug This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Preston Road

Preston Road - originally just ’Preston’ - is situated west along the Metropolitan Line from Wembley Park.

Preston, meaning ’the farm belonging to the priest’, began as a small settlement at Preston Green, just south west of the Lidding or Wealdstone Brook, south of Kenton. It was first mentioned in 1220. The name may come from an estate given to Abbot Stidberht by King Offa of Mercia in 767, but any connection with Preston Road as a rural lanethe Church had been lost by 1086. Preston was a township by 1231.

By the mid-15th century Preston consisted of two farms and a few cottages. The northern farm belonged to the Lyon family from the late 14th century and is described as being a beautiful building in 1547. It was probably the birthplace of John Lyon (1534-92), a considerable local landowner who founded Harrow School in 1572. After his death the farm was given as an endowment for the upkeep of the school. It was rebuilt around 1700. The southern farm was originally known as Preston Dicket and later as Preston Farm.

By 1681 five buildings had been built on Preston Green, including a new farmhouse, Hillside Farm. In 1759 there were nine buildings at Preston, including the ’Horseshoe’ inn,
which was licensed in 1751.

The district did not change significantly in the 19th century. The agricultural depression after the Napoleonic Wars led to an outbreak of violence in the area around 1828, when desperate agricultural labourers burnt haystacks and threatened local landowners, including the relatively benevolent Lord Northwick.

64 people lived in Preston in 1831 and 57 in 1851.

In 1851 the ’Rose & Crown’ beerhouse is mentioned at the top of Preston Hill (beerhouses flourished from 1830 to 1869 and were intended to discourage the sale of spirits). It appears to have been part of Hillside Farm, and is never mentioned again.

Preston House was leased to various professional men during the 19th century, including a surgeon, a cigar importer and a solicitor.

In 1864 two villas replaced the four nearby cottages. Around 1880 Preston House was acquired by George Timms, who turned the grounds into Preston Tea Gardens. The Tea Gardens flourished well into the next century.

The Metropolitan Railway had no effect on development, even after the opening of Wembley Park station in 1894. In 1896 the suggestion that a station should be built serving Preston was rejected because the local population was so small. Indeed even in the early 20th century the area was entirely rural, and the Wealdstone Brook could be described as "one of the most perfect little streams anywhere, abounding in dace and roach."

By 1900 Uxendon Farm had become a shooting ground (the Lancaster Shooting Club). When the Olympic Games were held in London in 1908 the ground was sufficiently important to be
used for Olympic clay pigeon shooting. Pressure from the shooting club, which was a two mile walk from the nearest station, played a part in the opening of Preston Road Halt on 21 May 1908.

The station was a halt (a request stop) and initially many trains failed to slow down enough to enable the driver to notice passengers waiting on the platform. Preston Road Halt triggered the first commuter development in the district. Some large Edwardian houses were built along Preston Road after 1910 and Harrow Golf Club opened near the station in 1912. Wembley Golf Club had already existed on the southern slopes of Barn Hill from about 1895. Both these golf courses would disappear under housing between the wars.

Further development in Preston came after the 1924-5 British Empire Exhibition. Roads in the area were prone to flooding, and the Exhibition led to significant and much needed improvements.

Many of the country lanes in the area were however not improved until 1931-2, under Wembley’s Town Planning Scheme. Preston Road indeed remained a country lane until the late 1930s, which may account for its considerable charm.Improved communications brought suburban development. Christ Church College, Oxford, and Harrow School sold their Preston
estates in the period 1921-33. Forty Green began being built over as early as 1923-4 and housing spread along Preston Road and Preston Hill in the three years that followed.

Shops appeared in 1927-8 and a pub, the ’Preston Park Hotel’ was opened in the late 1920s.

Preston Road was converted into a proper station in 1931-2. The line was electrified soon after and the station slightly re-sited. By now it was certain that the heart of Preston would be to the south of the old green. Many more shops appeared around the station in 1931-3 and 1936-8. Most housing developments occurred in the 1930s. By 1936 Preston was being described as "a high class and rapidly growing residential area with a population of between 6000 and 7000 people." A primary school was created to serve this population in 1932 and a secondary school in 1938.

In the 1930s many Jewish people, the majority members of the United Synagogue, moved into the Preston area. There is still a strong Jewish presence today.

By 1951 Preston’s population had risen to 12,408, although it declined somewhat thereafter. Post-war housing was built north and east of Preston Road and a number of prefabs, a temporary solution to homelessness, stood at Tenterden Close, Woodcock Hill, until the late 1960s. Proposals for an Anglican church at Preston had been published in 1936, but the war intervened and the Church of the Ascension was not consecrated until 1957.

By the early 1960s all of Preston’s old buildings had been lost. Lyon’s Farm was demolished in 1960, despite earlier plans to preserve it. Hillside farmhouse went in 1961 and Preston House was demolished in 1962-3. Both of these buildings were replaced by blocks of flats. Despite these losses Preston is a pleasant and prosperous-looking place that has retained its original atmosphere.



LOCAL PHOTOS
Postcard of Forty Farm
TUM image id: 1557227472
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Clarendon Gardens estate (1925)
TUM image id: 1574863417
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Postcard of Forty Farm
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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The Clarendon Gardens estate (1925)
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

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