Brownlow Road, Borehamwood, Herts.

Road in/near Borehamwood, existing between 1887 and now

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(51.65296 -0.27516) 

Brownlow Road, WD6

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Fullscreen map
Road · Borehamwood · WD6 ·
MARCH
1
2018

Brownlow Road was built together with Drayton Road.

Drayton Road was laid out to run parallel to Furzehill Road from a junction with Shenley Road. To enable traffic to traverse Drayton Road, a second street - Brownlow Road was built to connect the southern end with Furzehill Road.

In 1896, Charles Braithwaite who owned the Boreham Wood Engine Works and Loco Packing Company in Drayton Road, built houses for employees in Furzehill Road and Brownlow Road.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence



NEARBY STREETS
Aberford Road, WD6 Aberford Road is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Alban Crescent, WD6 Alban Crescent is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Albert Square, E20 Albert Square is the fictional location of the BBC soap opera EastEnders.
Almond Way, WD6 Almond Way is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Ascot Close, WD6 Ascot Close is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Auden Drive, WD6 This is a street in the WD6 postcode area
Audley Close, WD6 Audley Close is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Badminton Close, WD6 Badminton Close is a cul-de-sac running north from Stratfield Road.
Barnet Lane, WD6 Barnet Lane for centuries formed Hertfordshire’s boundary with Middlesex.
Barton Way, WD6 Barton Way is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Belmor, WD6 Belmor is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Berkeley Close, WD6 Berkeley Close is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Blyth Close, WD6 Blyth Close is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Bracken Close, WD6 Bracken Close is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Bradbury Close, WD6 Bradbury Close is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Brickfield Cottages, WD6 Brickfield Cottages were built in 1858 by Charles Morgan, who owned the brickfield next door.
Brodewater Road, WD6 Brodewater Road is a short road running between Broughinge Road and Hartforde Road.
Brook Road, WD6 Brook Road is one of the main arteries in the northern part of Borehamwood.
Broughinge Road, WD6 Broughinge Road is home to Boreham Wood Football Club.
Byron Avenue, WD6 Byron Avenue is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Caishowe Road, WD6 Caishowe Road links Odyssey Road with Hartforde Road in Borehamwood
Canterbury Road, WD6 Canterbury Road is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Cardinal Avenue, WD6 Cardinal Avenue leads south off of Shenley Road.
Catterick Way, WD6 Catterick Way is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Cavendish Crescent, WD6 Cavendish Crescent is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Cedars Close, WD6 Cedars Close is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Chandos Road, WD6 Chandos Road was constructed upon a remaining field of Tilehouse Farm.
Chatsworth Close, WD6 Chatsworth Close is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Chaucer Grove, WD6 Chaucer Grove is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Clarendon Road, WD6 Clarendon Road runs north from Shenley Road.
Coleridge Way, WD6 Coleridge Way is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Deacons Heights, WD6 Deacons Heights is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Deacons Hill Road, WD6 Deacons Hill Road is a road connecting Barnet Lane and Allum Lane.
Delamere Road, WD6 Delamere Road is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Drayton Road, WD6 Drayton Road is one of the older streets in Borehamwood.
Dunnock Close, WD6 Dunnock Close is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Eldon Avenue, WD6 Eldon Avenue is a street in Borehamwood.
Elmwood Avenue, WD6 Elmwood Avenue is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Essex Road, WD6 Essex Road was created just prior to the first world war.
Fairburn Close, WD6 Fairburn Close is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Fairway Avenue, WD6 Fairway Avenue links Brook Road and Eldon Avenue.
Furzehill Road, WD6 Furzehill Road runs from Shenley Road to Barnet Lane.
George Street, WD6 George Street is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Glenhaven Avenue, WD6 Glenhaven Avenue is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Goldfinch Way, WD6 This is a street in the WD6 postcode area
Goodwood Path, WD6 This is a street in the WD6 postcode area
Grosvenor Road, WD6 Grosvenor Road is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Grove Road, WD6 Grove Road is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Haddon Close, WD6 Haddon Close was one of a series of roads off Stratfield Road named after country estates.
Hartfield Avenue, WD6 Hartfield Avenue is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Hartfield Close, WD6 Hartfield Close is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Hartforde Road, WD6 Hartforde Road was a post-WW2 road.
Hillside Avenue, WD6 Hillside Avenue was a pre-war road laid out from 1937 onwards.
Hornbeam Close, WD6 Hornbeam Close is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Keats Close, WD6 Keats Close is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Lakeside Court, WD6 This is a street in the WD6 postcode area
Lexington Close, WD6 Lexington Close is a cul-de-sac that didn’t last.
Linton Avenue, WD6 Linton Avenue is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Malden Road, WD6 Malden Road is parallel to Essex Road.
Masefield Avenue, WD6 Masefield Avenue is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Meadow Road, WD6 Meadow Road is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Melrose Avenue, WD6 Melrose Avenue was the first built of Borehamwood’s ’poet’ roads.
Mildred Avenue, WD6 Mildred Avenue is a curious road, being in two halves.
Milton Drive, WD6 Milton Drive is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Northfield Road, WD6 Northfield Road is a cul-de-sac in Borehamwood.
Norton Close, WD6 Norton Close is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Oakwood Avenue, WD6 Oakwood Avenue is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Ranskill Road, WD6 Ranskill Road is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Shakespeare Drive, WD6 Shakespeare Drive, which was part of the former Furzehill School is part of a development by Persimmon Plc.
Shelley Close, WD6 This is a street in the WD6 postcode area
Shenley Road, WD6 Shenley Road is the main street running through Borehamwood.
Shiremead, WD6 This is a street in the WD6 postcode area
Shiremeade, WD6 Shiremeade is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Siskin Close, WD6 Siskin Close was built on the site of the Boreham Wood Engine Works.
Spring Close, WD6 Spring Close is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Station Road, WD6 Station Road was laid out shortly after the railway was built to connect new industry built alongside the railway with the centre of the village.
Stratfield Road, WD6 Stratfield Road was built over the land of Tilehouse Farm in the late 1960s.
Summer Hill, WD6 Summer Hill is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Sutton Path, WD6 This is a street in the WD6 postcode area
Tennison Avenue, WD6 Tennison Avenue is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Thirston Path, WD6 This is a street in the WD6 postcode area
Vale Avenue, WD6 Vale Avenue is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Warenford Way, WD6 Warenford Way is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Welbeck Close, WD6 Welbeck Close is a road in the WD6 postcode area
Whitehall Close, WD6 Whitehall Close was named for the Whitehall Studios which formerly stood on the site.
Whitehouse Avenue, WD6 Whitehouse Avenue was originally to be called Cornwall Avenue.
Winstre Road, WD6 Winstre Road leads from Grove Road to Broughinge Road.
Wordsworth Gardens, WD6 Wordsworth Gardens is a road in the WD6 postcode area


Queen's Park

Queen's Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen's Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen's Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen's Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen's Park 'proper' formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen's Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen's Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett's wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen's Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queens Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen's Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway (LNWR) on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen's Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen's Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR. As of December 2013, no mainline services calling at the station and the Watford service has been transferred to London Overground.
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