Goldbeaters Farm

Farm in/near Burnt Oak, existing until 1928

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Goldbeaters Farm

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Farm · * · HA8 ·
MAY
12
2017

Goldbeaters already existed by the 14th century.

The Goldbeaters estate may have originated in a grant of land and rent by John le Bret to William of Aldenham, goldbeater of London, in 1308. John Goldbeater held a house and some land of the manor of Hendon in 1321.

The Goldbeaters estate was held by John and Eve Clerk in 1434. By the early 18th century it had passed to Joseph Marsh, whose daughter and heir married Thomas Beech of London, the holder of 130 acres in the north of Hendon parish in 1754. After Beech’s death in 1772 some of the property was conveyed to John Raymond and later to Richard Capper.

In 1802 Mary Capper of Bushey (Herts.) and Robert Capper sold the whole of Goldbeaters to William Smith of Mayfair, who bought two closes called Staines and Shoelands, adjoining the farm, from John Nicholl of the Inner Temple in 1803 and a house, later the Bald Faced Stag, and four fields at Redhill from William Geeves in 1807. William Smith bought part of the near-by Shoelands Farm from John Nicholl of the Hyde in 1812 and purchased the rest from Jasper Holmes of Blackheath in 1821. In 1828, the farm measured 312 acres.

In 1859 John Smith sold Goldbeaters and Shoelands and Stagg fields, adjoining the Bald Faced Stag, which together totalled 253 acres, to James Marshall, co-founder of Marshall and Snelgrove’s drapery store in Oxford Street, London. Marshall in 1867 also bought the neighbouring Bunns farm, totalling 77 acres, from the five co-heirs of Robert Randall, a Fleet Street winemerchant.

In the 1860s, James Marshall, would only allow the Midland Railway Company to lay tracks through the farm if he could stop trains at his own discretion, a right which he never exercised.

After Marshall’s death in 1893 his son James C. Marshall sold Goldbeaters and Bunns farms to A. O. Crooke, a Hendon brewer, who sold them in 1900 to Sir John Blundell Maple of Orange Hill House. In 1924 the property, totalling 200 acres, was bought by the L.C.C. as a site for the Watling housing estate.

The farm was demolished in 1928.


Main source: Barnet Council - barnet.gov.uk
Further citations and sources



Goldbeaters Farm in 1877 - demolished in 1928 and where Goldbeaters Grove stands today

Goldbeaters Farm in 1877 - demolished in 1928 and where Goldbeaters Grove stands today
User unknown/public domain

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Goldbeaters Farm Goldbeaters already existed by the 14th century.

NEARBY STREETS
Abbots Road, HA8 Abbots Road follows a footpath which stretched from Bunns Lane to Orange Hill House.
Arundel Gardens, HA8 Arundel Gardens is a road in the HA8 postcode area
Beech Walk, NW7 Beech Walk is a road in the NW7 postcode area
Benningholm Road, HA8 A street within the HA8 postcode
Benningholme Road, HA8 Benningholme Road is a road in the HA8 postcode area
Brockenhurst Gardens, NW7 Brockenhurst Gardens is a street in Mill Hill.
Brook Walk, HA8 Brook Walk is a road in the HA8 postcode area
Cardinal Close, HA8 Cardinal Close is a road in the HA8 postcode area
Cressingham Road, HA8 Cressingham Road is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Delamere Gardens, NW7 Delamere Gardens is a street in Mill Hill.
Downhurst Avenue, NW7 Downhurst Avenue is a road in the NW7 postcode area
Edwin Road, HA8 Edwin Road is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Eversfield Gardens, HA8 Eversfield Gardens is a road in the HA8 postcode area
Eversfield Gardens, NW7 Eversfield Gardens is a road in the NW7 postcode area
Former M1 J2, NW7 Former M1 J2 is a road in the NW7 postcode area
Gold Hill, HA8 Gold Hill is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Gold Lane, HA8 Gold Lane is a road in the HA8 postcode area
Goldbeaters Grove, HA8 Goldbeaters Grove is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Hale Drive, NW7 Hale Drive is a street in Mill Hill.
Holmwood Grove, NW7 Holmwood Grove is a road in the NW7 postcode area
Homefield Road, HA8 Homefield Road is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Horsecroft Road, HA8 Horsecroft Road is a road in the HA8 postcode area
Islip Gardens, HA8 Islip Gardens is a road in the HA8 postcode area
Langley Park, NW7 Langley Park is a street in Mill Hill.
Limes Avenue, NW7 Limes Avenue is a street in Mill Hill.
Lyndhurst Avenue, HA8 Lyndhurst Avenue is a road in the HA8 postcode area
Lyndhurst Avenue, NW7 Lyndhurst Avenue is a street in Mill Hill.
Maple Gardens, HA8 Maple Gardens is a road in the HA8 postcode area
Milling Road, HA8 Milling Road is a road in the HA8 postcode area
Oldberry Road, HA8 Oldberry Road is a road in the HA8 postcode area
Rivington Crescent, NW7 Rivington Crescent, while part of the Graham Park estate, is over the ’ postcode border’ to lie in NW7.
Sandbrook Close, NW7 Sandbrook Close is a road in the NW7 postcode area
Sefton Avenue, NW7 Sefton Avenue is a street in Mill Hill.
Spalding Close, HA8 Spalding Close is a road in the HA8 postcode area
Stanhope Gardens, NW7 Stanhope Gardens is a street in Mill Hill.
Station Road, NW7 Station Road is a street in Mill Hill.
Storksmead Road, HA8 Storksmead Road is a road in the HA8 postcode area
Sunnydale Gardens, NW7 Sunnydale Gardens is a road in the NW7 postcode area
Sylvan Avenue, NW7 Sylvan Avenue is a street in Mill Hill.
The Meads, HA8 The Meads is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
University Close, NW7 University Close lies off of Rivington Crescent.
Wardell Close, HA8 Wardell Close is a road in the HA8 postcode area
Wolsey Grove, HA8 Wolsey Grove is a road in the HA8 postcode area
Woodcroft Avenue, HA8 Woodcroft Avenue is a road in the HA8 postcode area
Woodcroft Avenue, NW7 Woodcroft Avenue is a street in Mill Hill.
Woodland Way, NW7 Woodland Way is a street in Mill Hill.


Burnt Oak

Burnt Oak tube station is a London Underground station in on the Edgware branch of the Northern Line, between Edgware and Colindale stations.

The name Burnt Oak was first used in 1754 and from then until the 1850s referred to no more than a field on the eastern side of the Edgware Road (Watling Street). Nor is there evidence that the name implies anything except that the field had once contained a burnt oak tree.

In May 1844 Burnt Oak field was sold to a Mr Essex, and by the 1860s plans were in place to build three residential streets: North Street, East Street, and South Street. The application of the field name to the area seems to have followed from this new estate and was in use by the end of the 19th century.

However, the area was generally known as Red Hill until the opening of Burnt Oak tube station.

The station was designed by architect Stanley Heaps and opened as Burnt Oak (Watling) on the 27 October 1924, two months after the extension of the Hampstead & Highgate Line from Hendon Central to Edgware had opened. The station was originally provided with a temporary structure before the final ticket office building was constructed in 1925. The suffix was dropped from the name about 1950.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Bald Faced Stag
TUM image id: 1041
RAF Museum
TUM image id: 1094
Apex Corner in the 1920s.
TUM image id: 1155
Hale Lane
TUM image id: 2371
Featherstone Farm (1909)
TUM image id: 1517934317
The Edgware Road in Colindale
TUM image id: 1517936686
Silk Stream near Colindale (1916)
TUM image id: 1517938166
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