Windmill Lane, EN5

An area which may have existed since the nineteenth century or before. Most of the urban landscape is interwar

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(51.64438 -0.23992, 51.644 -0.239) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · High Barnet · EN5 ·
JUNE
3
2017

Windmill Lane is a road in the EN5 postcode area

0
This project defines its coverage as the area within the M25 orbital motorway but extending beyond this as follows:

  • Where the London Underground stretches beyond the M25. Hence we cover Amersham, Chesham, Chalfont and Epping too.

  • Where the administrative Greater London stretches beyond the M25 - the single case of North Ockendon

  • Areas of the former county of Middlesex beyond the M25: Potters Bar, South Mimms and Poyle


What defines 'London' is open to interpretation. Since 1965, there has been an area officially referred to as Greater London but London's postal area - the area covered postcodes beginning E, N, NW, W, SE, SW, WC and EC is another definition - though part of E4 lies outside the administrative area known as Greater London.

The small ancient City of London at its core once comprised the whole settlement, but as its urban area grew, the Corporation of London resisted attempts to amalgamate the city with its suburbs , causing "London" to be defined in a number of ways for different purposes.

Forty per cent of Greater London is covered by the London post town, within which 'LONDON' forms part of postal addresses. The London telephone area code (020) covers a larger area, similar in size to Greater London, although some outer districts are excluded and some places just outside are included. The Greater London boundary has been aligned to the M25 motorway in places.



Outward urban expansion is now prevented by the Metropolitan Green Belt, although the built-up area extends beyond the boundary in places, resulting in a separately defined Greater London Urban Area. Beyond this is the vast London commuter belt. Greater London is split for some purposes into Inner London and Outer London.

The city is split by the River Thames into North and South, with an informal central London area in its interior. The coordinates of the nominal centre of London, traditionally considered to be the original Eleanor Cross at Charing Cross near the junction of Trafalgar Square and Whitehall. However the geographical centre of London, on one definition, is in the London Borough of Lambeth, just 0.1 miles to the northeast of Lambeth North tube station.


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

None so far :(
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 08:59 GMT   

Spigurnell Road, N17
I was born and lived in Spigurnell Road no 32 from 1951.My father George lived in Spigurnell Road from 1930’s.When he died in’76 we moved to number 3 until I got married in 1982 and moved to Edmonton.Spigurnell Road was a great place to live.Number 32 was 2 up 2 down toilet out the back council house in those days

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Comment
Lewis   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 20:48 GMT   

Ploy
Allotment

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

Reply
Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Arkley Arkley is located north-west of London, and at 482 ft above sea level is one of the highest points.
Arkley Windmill Barnet Gate Mill or Arkley Windmill is a grade II* listed tower mill at Barnet Gate.

NEARBY STREETS
Brickfield Lane, EN5 Brickfield Lane is a road in the EN5 postcode area
Chantry Close, NW7 Chantry Close is a road in the NW7 postcode area
Dingle Close, EN5 Dingle Close is a road in the EN5 postcode area
Flower Gate Cottage, EN5 Flower Gate Cottage is a road in the EN5 postcode area
Glebe Lane, EN5 Glebe Lane is a road in the EN5 postcode area
Hawthorn Grove, EN5 A street within the EN5 postcode
Hayden Close, EN5 Hayden Close is a location in London.
Hendon Wood Lane, EN5 Hendon Wood Lane may have originally been a Roman road.
Hillside, EN5 Hillside is a road in the EN5 postcode area
Kates Close, EN5 Kates Close is a road in the EN5 postcode area
Lynford Close, EN5 Lynford Close is a road in the EN5 postcode area
Meadowbanks, EN5 Meadowbanks is a road in the EN5 postcode area
Rockways, EN5 Rockways is a road in the EN5 postcode area
Rowley Green Road, EN5 Rowley Green Road is a road in the EN5 postcode area
Sandalwood Close, EN5 A street within the EN5 postcode
Sandelwood Close, EN5 A street within the EN5 postcode
Winifred Close, EN5 Winifred Close is a road in the EN5 postcode area
Winifred Close, EN5 Winifred Close is a road in the NW7 postcode area
Wylo Drive, EN5 Wylo Drive is a road in the EN5 postcode area

NEARBY PUBS
Arkley Golf Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Gate This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Barnet grass speedway in operation
TUM image id: 1526569186
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Thatched Barn
TUM image id: 1488372418
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Path in Barnet Gate Wood
Credit: Dudley Miles
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

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