World’s End Passage, SW10

Road in/near Chelsea

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(51.482009 -0.179009, 51.482 -0.179) 
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Road · Chelsea · SW10 ·
July
17
2017

World’s End Passage is a road in the SW10 postcode area





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963’65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

Reply
Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
danny currie   
Added: 30 Nov 2022 18:39 GMT   

dads yard
ron currie had a car breaking yard in millers yard back in the 60s good old days

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Lynette beardwood   
Added: 29 Nov 2022 20:53 GMT   

Spy’s Club
Topham’s Hotel at 24-28 Ebury Street was called the Ebury Court Hotel. Its first proprietor was a Mrs Topham. In WW2 it was a favourite watering hole for the various intelligence organisations based in the Pimlico area. The first woman infiltrated into France in 1942, FANY Yvonne Rudellat, was recruited by the Special Operations Executive while working there. She died in Bergen Belsen in April 1945.

Reply
Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:39 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

Reply
Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:38 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

Reply
Lived here
Phil Stubbington   
Added: 14 Nov 2022 16:28 GMT   

Numbers 60 to 70 (1901 - 1939)
A builder, Robert Maeers (1842-1919), applied to build six houses on plots 134 to 139 on the Lincoln House Estate on 5 October 1901. He received approval on 8 October 1901. These would become numbers 60 to 70 Rodenhurst Road (60 is plot 139). Robert Maeers was born in Northleigh, Devon. In 1901 he was living in 118 Elms Road with his wife Georgina, nee Bagwell. They had four children, Allan, Edwin, Alice, and Harriet, born between 1863 and 1873.
Alice Maeers was married to John Rawlins. Harriet Maeers was married to William Street.
Three of the six houses first appear on the electoral register in 1904:
Daniel Mescal “Ferncroft”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By the 1905 electoral register all six are occupied:

Daniel Mescal “St Senans”
Henry Robert Honeywood “Grasmere”
John Rawlins “Iveydene”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Walter Ernest Manning “St Hilda”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By 1906 house numbers replace names:

Daniel Mescal 70
Henry Robert Honeywood 68
John Rawlins 66
William Francis Street 64
Walter Ernest Manning 62
Henry Elkin 60

It’s not clear whether number 70 changed from “Ferncroft” to “St Senans” or possibly Daniel Mescal moved houses.

In any event, it can be seen that Robert Maeers’ two daughters are living in numbers 64 and 66, with, according to local information, an interconnecting door. In the 1911 census William Street is shown as a banker’s clerk. John Rawlins is a chartering clerk in shipping. Robert Maeers and his wife are also living at this address, Robert being shown as a retired builder.

By 1939 all the houses are in different ownership except number 60, where the Elkins are still in residence.


Reply
Comment
stephen garraway   
Added: 13 Nov 2022 13:56 GMT   

Martin Street, Latimer Road
I was born at St Charlottes and lived at 14, Martin Street, Latimer Road W10 until I was 4 years old when we moved to the east end. It was my Nan Grant’s House and she was the widow of George Frederick Grant. She had two sons, George and Frederick, and one daughter, my mother Margaret Patricia.
The downstairs flat where we lived had two floors, the basement and the ground floor. The upper two floors were rented to a Scot and his family, the Smiths. He had red hair. The lights and cooker were gas and there was one cold tap over a Belfast sink. A tin bath hung on the wall. The toilet was outside in the yard. This was concreted over and faced the the rear of the opposite terraces. All the yards were segregated by high brick walls. The basement had the a "best" room with a large , dark fireplace with two painted metal Alsation ornaments and it was very dark, cold and little used.
The street lights were gas and a man came round twice daily to turn them on and off using a large pole with a hook and a lighted torch on the end. I remember men coming round the streets with carts selling hot chestnuts and muffins and also the hurdy gurdy man with his instrument and a monkey in a red jacket. I also remember the first time I saw a black man and my mother pulling me away from him. He had a Trilby and pale Mackintosh so he must of been one of the first of the Windrush people. I seem to recall he had a thin moustache.
Uncle George had a small delivery lorry but mum lost touch with him and his family. Uncle Fred went to Peabody Buildings near ST.Pauls.
My Nan was moved to a maisonette in White City around 1966, and couldn’t cope with electric lights, cookers and heating and she lost all of her neighbourhood friends. Within six months she had extreme dementia and died in a horrible ward in Tooting Bec hospital a year or so later. An awful way to end her life, being moved out of her lifelong neighbourhood even though it was slums.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 31 Oct 2022 18:47 GMT   

Memories
I lived at 7 Conder Street in a prefab from roughly 1965 to 1971 approx - happy memories- sad to see it is no more ?

Reply

Eve Glover   
Added: 22 Oct 2022 09:28 GMT   

Shenley Road
Shenley Road is the main street in Borehamwood where the Job Centre and Blue Arrow were located

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Chelsea Farm Chelsea Farm was established on the northern banks of the Thames on land previously open to common pasturage after the annual harvest.
Cremorne Gardens Cremorne Gardens, with a vestige existing today, was in its prime between 1846 and 1877.

NEARBY STREETS
Ann Lane, SW10 Ann Lane is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Ashburnham Road, SW10 Ashburnham Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Battersea Bridge, SW11 Battersea Bridge connects Battersea and Chelsea with the first bridge dating from 1771.
Battersea Bridge, SW3 Battersea Bridge, a five-span arch bridge with cast-iron girders and granite piers links Battersea south of the River Thames with Chelsea to the north.
Beaufort Street, SW3 Beaufort Street was laid out in 1766 on the site of Beaufort House.
Blantyre Street, SW10 Blantyre Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Burnaby Street, SW10 Burnaby Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Callow Street, SW3 Callow Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Camera Place, SW10 Camera Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Chelsea Crescent, SW10 Chelsea Crescent is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Chelsea Park Gardens, SW3 Chelsea Park Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Chelsea Reach, SW10 Chelsea Reach is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Chelsea Studios, SW10 Chelsea Studios is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Chelsea Wharf, SW10 Chelsea Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Cheyne Walk, SW10 Cheyne Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Condray Place, SW11 Condray Place is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Cremorne Road, SW10 Cremorne Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Damer Terrace, SW10 Damer Terrace is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Danvers Street, SW3 Sir John Danvers (died 1655) introduced Italian gardens to England in his mansion Danvers House whose grounds spread from the river to the Kings Road.
Dartrey Tower, SW10 Dartrey Tower is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
East Road, SW10 East Road is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Edith Grove, SW10 Edith Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Edith Terrace, SW10 Edith Terrace is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Edith Yard Edith Grove, SW10 Edith Yard Edith Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Elm Park Mansions, SW10 Elm Park Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Esher House, SW10 Residential block
Farrier Walk, SW10 Farrier Walk is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Fawcett Street, SW10 Fawcett Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Fernshaw Close, SW10 Fernshaw Close is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Fernshaw Road, SW10 Fernshaw Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Fulham Road, SW10 Fulham Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Gertrude Street, SW10 Gertrude Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Greaves Tower, SW10 Greaves Tower is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Gunter Grove, SW10 Gunter Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Gwyn Close, SW6 Gwyn Close is a road in the SW6 postcode area
Hobury Street, SW10 Hobury Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Hollywood Mews, SW10 Hollywood Mews is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Hollywood Road, SW10 Hollywood Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Hortensia Road, SW10 Hortensia Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Justice Walk, SW3 Justice Walk links Old Church Street and Lawrence Street.
King’s Road, SW10 This is a street in the SW10 postcode area
Kings Road, SW10 Kings Road stretches from the fashionable SW3 end into the SW10 area.
Lamont Road, SW10 Lamont Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Langton Street, SW10 Langton Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Limerston Street, SW10 Limerston Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
London House, SW10 Residential block
Lots Road, SW10 Lots Road, older than the surrounding streets, was once Pooles Lane which was a track leading to Chelsea Farm.
Mallord Street, SW3 Mallord Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Milmans Street, SW10 Milmans Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Moravian Place, SW10 Moravian Place is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Munro Terrace, SW10 Munro Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Netherton Grove, SW10 Netherton Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Nightingale Place, SW10 Nightingale Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Park Walk, SW10 Park Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Park Walk, SW3 Park Walk is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Paultons Square, SW3 Paultons Square, a garden square, was built in 1836–40 on the site of a former market garden.
Paultons Street, SW3 Paultons Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Paveley Drive, SW11 Paveley Drive is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Petyt Place, SW3 Petyt Place is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Raasay Street, SW10 Raasay Street ran from Dartrey Road to Edith Grove.
Ramsay Mews, SW3 Ramsay Mews is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Redcliffe Place, SW10 Redcliffe Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Riley Street, SW10 Riley Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Shalcomb Street, SW10 Shalcomb Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Slaidburn Street, SW10 Slaidburn Street is a street in London
St Lukes Church Hall, SW10 St Lukes Church Hall is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Stadium Street, SW10 Stadium Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Tadema Road, SW10 Tadema Road was named after Lawrence Alma-Tadema
Tetcott Road, SW10 Tetcott Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
The Courtyard, SW3 The Courtyard is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
The Plaza, SW10 The Plaza is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
The Vale, SW3 The Vale is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Thorndike Close, SW10 Thorndike Close is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Thorney Crescent, SW11 Thorney Crescent is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Trident Place, SW3 Trident Place is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Upcerne Road, SW10 Upcerne Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Upper Whistler Walk, SW10 This is a street in the SW10 postcode area
Uverdale Road, SW10 Uverdale Road runs north from Lots Road.
Wardens Square, SW6 Wardens Square is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
West Road, SW10 West Road is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Whistler Walk, SW10 Whistler Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Whistlers Avenue, SW11 Whistlers Avenue is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Worlds End Place, SW10 Worlds End Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 524 completed street histories and 46976 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


Chelsea

Chelsea is an affluent area, bounded to the south by the River Thames.

Its eastern boundary was once defined by the River Westbourne, which is now in a pipe above Sloane Square tube station. The modern eastern boundary is Chelsea Bridge Road and the lower half of Sloane Street, including Sloane Square, along with parts of Belgravia. To the north and northwest, the area fades into Knightsbridge and South Kensington, but it is safe to say that the area north of King’s Road as far northwest as Fulham Road is part of Chelsea.

The word Chelsea originates from the Old English term for chalk and landing place on the river. The first record of the Manor of Chelsea precedes the Domesday Book and records the fact that Thurstan, governor of the King’s Palace during the reign of Edward the Confessor (1042–1066), gave the land to the Abbot and Convent of Westminster. Abbot Gervace subsequently assigned the manor to his mother, and it passed into private ownership. The modern-day Chelsea hosted the Synod of Chelsea in 787 AD.

Chelsea once had a reputation for the manufacture of Chelsea buns (made from a long strip of sweet dough tightly coiled, with currants trapped between the layers, and topped with sugar).

King Henry VIII acquired the manor of Chelsea from Lord Sandys in 1536; Chelsea Manor Street is still extant. Two of King Henry’s wives, Catherine Parr and Anne of Cleves, lived in the Manor House; Princess Elizabeth – the future Queen Elizabeth I – resided there; and Thomas More lived more or less next door at Beaufort House. In 1609 James I established a theological college on the site of the future Chelsea Royal Hospital, which Charles II founded in 1682.

By 1694, Chelsea – always a popular location for the wealthy, and once described as ’a village of palaces’ – had a population of 3000. Even so, Chelsea remained rural and served London to the east as a market garden, a trade that continued until the 19th-century development boom which caused the final absorption of the district into the metropolis.

Chelsea shone, brightly but briefly, in the 1960s Swinging London period and the early 1970s. The Swinging Sixties was defined on King’s Road, which runs the length of the area. The Western end of Chelsea featured boutiques Granny Takes a Trip and The Sweet Shop, the latter of which sold medieval silk velvet caftans, tabards and floor cushions, with many of the cultural cognoscenti of the time being customers, including Keith Richards, Twiggy and many others.

The exclusivity of Chelsea as a result of its high property prices has historically resulted in the term Sloane Ranger to be used to describe its residents. From 2011, Channel 4 broadcast a reality television show called Made in Chelsea, documenting the ’glitzy’ lives of several young people living in Chelsea. Moreover, Chelsea is home to one of the largest communities of Americans living outside of the United States, with 6.53% of Chelsea-residents being born in the United States.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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The Dancing Platform at Cremorne Gardens (1864) In the 17th century, Chelsea Farm was formed and the area was used for market gardening plots, supplying central London. In 1778, Lord Cremorne bought Chelsea Farm and Cremorne House was built. In 1830 Charles Random de Berenger, a colourful character implicated in financial fraud during the Napoleonic War, purchased Cremorne House. He was a keen sportsman and opened a sports club know as Cremorne Stadium for ‘skilful and manly exercise’ including shooting, sailing, archery and fencing. In 1846, De Berenger’s Cremorne Stadium was transformed into a pleasure garden which became a popular and noisy place of entertainment. The entertainment included a diverse range of activities including concerts, fireworks, balloon ascents, galas and theatre.
Credit: Phoebus Levin
TUM image id: 1526047056
Licence:
Elm Park Gardens
TUM image id: 1573064988
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The Dancing Platform at Cremorne Gardens (1864) In the 17th century, Chelsea Farm was formed and the area was used for market gardening plots, supplying central London. In 1778, Lord Cremorne bought Chelsea Farm and Cremorne House was built. In 1830 Charles Random de Berenger, a colourful character implicated in financial fraud during the Napoleonic War, purchased Cremorne House. He was a keen sportsman and opened a sports club know as Cremorne Stadium for ‘skilful and manly exercise’ including shooting, sailing, archery and fencing. In 1846, De Berenger’s Cremorne Stadium was transformed into a pleasure garden which became a popular and noisy place of entertainment. The entertainment included a diverse range of activities including concerts, fireworks, balloon ascents, galas and theatre.
Credit: Phoebus Levin
Licence:


Elm Park Gardens
Licence: CC BY 2.0


24-hour potato service on the King’s Road, Chelsea (1962)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Boys and girls kick a ball around a quiet Uverdale Road, Chelsea (early 1960s). The road is now filled with parked cars and a gated playground. Just down the road from major bomb sites, this was one of a cluster of streets that became a ghost town in the wake of the Blitz
Credit: John Bignell
Licence:


Old Battersea Bridge, Walter Greaves (oil on canvas, 1874) Old Battersea Bridge, seen from upstream, on Lindsey Row (now Cheyne Walk), with Battersea on the far shore. The boatyard belonging to the Greaves family is in the foreground. On the extreme left is the wall surrounding the garden of the artist William Bell Scott. In the far distance Crystal Palace is just visible. Battersea Bridge was demolished in 1881, and replaced with the present bridge. Before the alterations Greaves recalled the danger to shipping and the difficulty of steering through the arches unless the ‘set of the tide was known’.
Credit: Tate Gallery
Licence:


Chelsea Farm in the days of Countess Huntindon
Credit: Kensington and Chelsea Libraries
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Lots Road Power Station (2005).
Credit: Adrian Pingstone
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Graffiti, Raasay Street, Chelsea (1969).
Credit: Roger Perry
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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