Oslo Court, NW8

Block in/near Queen’s Park, existing between 1938 and now

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Block · * · NW8 ·
July
11
2021

Oslo Court was built between 1936 and 1938 by architect Robert Atkinson.

10583
Oslo Court was built over the final remaining 30 workmen’s cottages in the St John’s Wood area. These were demolished in 1936, after which the gentrification of NW8 was more or less complete (Lisson Grove notwithstanding).

Set back behind an enclosed garden area, the Grade II listed brick block consists of seven floors containing 125 flats, 112 of which have a direct view over Regent’s Park. Oslo Court has an L-shape plan with a two bay end to Prince Albert Road, nine bays to Culworth Street and seven to Charlbert Street.

This work of Robert Atkinson (1883–1952) has been described as the style of ’restrained modernism’ by englishbuildings.blogspot.com. Crittall windows are used and there are small sculptural panels, with Nordic themes such as a reindeer and a long boat. Each flat was designed with a living room, bedroom, kitchen, bathroom and a small hall. Each also had a balcony, and a restaurant was provided on the ground floor for the use of tenants.

The rents originally varied from £140 to £250 per annum, according to the outward aspect of the view. The stepped balconies ensured that each flat had a south-facing aspect. All of the windows still retain their steel casements..


Oslo Court, NW8 (click to enlarge)

Many blocks in the area had restaurants in days gone by but have, one by one, disappeared. The one in Oslo Court has been trading since the Second World War and, in its curious location, remains open to the general public. Many food critics have visited and talked (nay, raved) about its 1970s ’vibe’.

The basement was used during the Second World War as a shelter for local residents as well as for the flat owners. It was improvised from an existing garage, fitted out with cubicles with two-tier bunks. Artist Olga Lehman (1912 – 2001), well-known for her murals and portraits, and was permitted by the War Office to make sketches of air raid shelters and came to Oslo Court to sketch.

In a 1963 episode ('The Rough Diamonds') of The Saint, Simon Templar took Barbara Sinclair (played by Jemma Hyde) back to her Oslo Court flat in his Volvo.




Main source: https://www.stjohnswoodmemories.org.uk/
Further citations and sources


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



James Preston   
Added: 28 Apr 2021 09:06 GMT   

School
Was this the location of Rosslyn House prep school? I have a photograph of the Rosslyn House cricket team dated 1910 which features my grandfather (Alan Westbury Preston). He would have been 12 years old at the time. All the boys on the photo have been named. If this is the location of the school then it appears that the date of demolition is incorrect.

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Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

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Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

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Comment
Matthew Moggridge ([email protected])   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 10:38 GMT   

Lord Chatham’s Ride (does it even exist?)
Just to say that I cycled from my home in Sanderstead to Knockholt Pound at the weekend hoping to ride Lord Chatham’s Ride, but could I find it? No. I rode up Chevening Lane, just past the Three Horseshoes pub and when I reached the end of the road there was a gate and a sign reading "Private, No Entry". I assumed this was the back entrance to Chevening House, country retreat of the Foreign Secretary, and that Lord Chatham’s Ride was inside the grounds. At least that’s what I’m assuming as I ended up following a footpath that led me into some woods with loads of rooted pathways, all very annoying. Does Lord Chatham’s Ride exist and if so, can I ride it, or is it within the grounds of Chevening House and, therefore, out of bounds? Here’s an account of my weekend ride with images, see URL below.

Source: No Visible Lycra: Lord Chatham’s ride: a big disappointmen

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norma brown   
Added: 20 Aug 2021 21:12 GMT   

my grandparents lived there as well as 2 further generations
my home

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Ruth   
Added: 6 Aug 2021 13:31 GMT   

Cheltenham Road, SE15
Harris Girls’ Academy, in Homestall Road, just off Cheltenham Road, was formerly Waverley School. Before that it was built as Honor Oak Girls’ Grammar School. It was also the South London Emergency School during WW2,taking girls from various schools in the vicinity, including those returning from being evacuated.

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 08:59 GMT   

Spigurnell Road, N17
I was born and lived in Spigurnell Road no 32 from 1951.My father George lived in Spigurnell Road from 1930’s.When he died in’76 we moved to number 3 until I got married in 1982 and moved to Edmonton.Spigurnell Road was a great place to live.Number 32 was 2 up 2 down toilet out the back council house in those days

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
St John’s Wood St John’s Wood is an affluent district, north west of Regent’s Park.

NEARBY STREETS
Acacia Place, NW8 Acacia Place is a short cul-de-sac off Acacia Road.
Acacia Road, NW8 Acacia Road dates from the 1830s.
Allitsen Road, NW8 Allitsen Road is a road in St John’s Wood, dating from the 1820s.
Aquila Street, NW8 Aquila Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Avenue Close, NW8 Avenue Close is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Barrow Hill Road, NW8 Barrow Hill Road marks the location of Barrow Hill.
Bentinck Close, NW8 Bentinck Close is possibly named after Lord George Bentinck (1802-1848), Conservative politician and racehorse owner.
Bridgeman Street, NW8 Bridgeman Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Broxwood Way, NW8 Broxwood Way is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Cavendish Avenue, NW8 Cavendish Avenue was built on land owned by Cavendish family.
Cavendish Close, NW8 Cavendish Close leads off Cavendish Avenue.
Cecil Grove, NW8 Cecil Grove is a location in London.
Charlbert Street, NW8 Charlbert Street was formerly Charles Street.
Charles Lane, NW8 Charles Lane is probably named after Charles Watkins, a property developer who was working locally in the 1820s.
Cicely Davies House, NW8 Cicely Davies House is one of five blocks of flats built for the St Marylebone Housing Association.
Circus Road, NW8 Circus Road reflects the circular shape of the original Eyre Estate building plan.
Cochrane Mews, NW8 Cochrane Mews runs off Circus Road and Cochrane Street.
Cochrane Street, NW8 Cochrane Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Culworth Street, NW8 Culworth Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Eamont Street, NW8 Eamont Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Elm Tree Road, NW8 Elm Tree Road is a road in the NW8 postcode area
George Eyre House, NW8 George Eyre House was designed by architect Louis de Soissons.
Greenberry Street, NW8 Greenberry Street has a name which is possibly a corruption of Green Barrow Hill.
Hanover House, NW8 Hanover House is located on St Johns Wood High Street.
Henstridge Place, NW8 Henstridge Place (rather obscurely) refers to a ridge where stallions are kept.
Kingsmill Terrace, NW8 Kingsmill Terrace is named after a member of the Eyre family.
Mackennal Street, NW8 Mackennal Street received its name since Bertram Mackennal, a sculptor, lived nearby.
Newcourt Street, NW8 Newcourt Street is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Ordnance Hill, NW8 Ordnance Hill is so-named because the Board of Ordnance was the original lessee of St John’s Wood Barracks.
Ormonde Terrace, NW8 Ormonde Terrace is a road in the NW8 postcode area
O’Neill House, NW8 O’Neill House is a block along Cochrane Street.
Prince Albert Road, NW8 Originally called Albert Road, it was renamed after the Prince Consort of Queen Victoria in 1938.
Prince Albert Road, NW8 Prince Albert Road is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Queen’s Terrace, NW8 Queen’s Terrace is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Rossetti Mews, NW8 Rossetti Mews is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Shannon Place, NW8 Shannon Place is a location in London.
St Edmund’s Terrace, NW8 St Edmund’s Terrace is a road in the NW8 postcode area
St James’s Close, NW8 St James’s Close is a road in the NW8 postcode area
St John’s Wood Terrace, NW8 St John’s Wood Terrace is a road in the NW8 postcode area
St John’s Wood High Street, NW8 St John’s Wood High Street is a shopping street of St John’s Wood.
St. Edmunds Terrace, NW8 St. Edmunds Terrace is a location in London.
St. James’s Terrace, NW8 St. James’s Terrace is a location in London.
Tatham Place, NW8 Tatham Place is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Titchfield Road, NW8 Titchfield Road is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Townshend Estate, NW8 Townshend Estate is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Townshend Road, NW8 Townshend Road was named after the commander who received the French surrender of Quebec in 1759.
Wellington Place, NW8 Wellington Place, like Wellington Road, is named for the Duke of Wellington who defeated Napoleon at the battle of Waterloo in 1815.
Wellington Road, NW8 Wellington Road is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Wells Rise, NW8 This is a street in the NW8 postcode area
Woronzow Road, NW8 Woronzow Road was named after Count Woronzow, Russian ambassador from 1785-1806


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
A photographer called Iain Macmillan was a friend of John and Yoko and, during the morning of Friday 8 August 1969 found himself commissioned to take a photo of the Fab Four to adorn their latest studio release, an album called ’Abbey Road’. As the group waited outside the studio for the shoot to begin, Linda McCartney took a number of extra photographs.
Credit: Apple Corps
Licence:
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

Abbey lodge as it appeared on the 1872 Ordnance Survey map. It faces Park Road with Hanover Gate to its north and Hanover Terrace behind.
Credit: Crown Copyright (expired)
Licence: CC BY 2.0
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

The oldest parts of the Barrow Hill Estate in St John’s Wood date from 1937
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
Licence:
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Allitsen Road, NW8 was named after Frances Allitsen, a songwriter. During the Boer War, she composed the then-popular ’There’s A Land’.
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
Licence:
To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

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