Kensal House, W10

Block in/near North Kensington, existing between 1936 and now

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Block · North Kensington · W10 ·
December
26
2017

Kensal House (1936), was designed to show off the power of gas and originally had no electricity at all.

Built next to Kensal Green Gas Works, it was designed by architect Maxwell Fry in collaboration with Elizabeth Denby to set new standards.

Originally, the building was intended for the housing of the employees of the Gas Light and Coke Company and was situated on the company site. Until the Second World War, blocks of flats were often designed to include communal amenities. For the wealthy, these were an added luxury or convenience paid for by a service charge, while for the less well-off in state housing they were a way of sharing basic facilities. In this progressive modernist housing scheme there were communal workshops and other shared facilities, including a community centre, crèche, communal laundry and canteen facilities.

The original design of the Kensal House flats was intended to act as a competitor to the advance of electricity as both as lighting and power source. As originally designed, in Kensal House, there was no electricity supply at all.

There was an electrical battery used to ignite the centre ceiling room lights. The wall switch, when pushed downwards activated a cable which opened thr gas flow to the centre room light. This also sent a supply from the battery to a heating element which ignited the gas to the gas mantle, which then lit the room.

Cooking was done on a gas oven, and gas hob, and the heating of the hot water was by way of a gas geyser. (A geyser by the way was a device which was fixed to the wall in the kitchen; it was about 24 inches high and about 6 inches diameter. It had a water supply connection, and a gas supply connection, and was designed to supply instant hot water whenever it was needed. It worked by way of a water valve, which operated as soon as water flowed through it, because the water also open the gas valve which was then ignited by a small pilot light, which then heated the water to the water tap in both the kitchen and bathroom. Therefore only the required amount of hot water was used, as the water heating only worked when the water flowed through it.)

Room heating was by way of a open coke fire in the sitting room and a gas fire in the main bedroom.

The amenities were: a bathroom and toilet, a fitted kitchen, a gas-heated boiler for clothes washing, a larder cupboard, clothes drying balcony, a further balcony adjoining the living room and bedrooms (two or three in number).

Each flat had a loudspeaker fixed to the wall. There was also a switch which gave a limited choice of programmes. This was all controlled from a radio room on the roof of Kensal House, and the caretaker was the only person with control over what was listened to. While obviously there was an electrical supply to the radio room, there was no control, other than the loudspeaker in the flat.

Communal living facilities weres a great step forward from the norm, with two large green lawn areas, a workshop for the men tenants, and classes for dressmaking and similar activities for the women tenants. The club activities encompassed acting, cooking, and various instructional classes for both sexes. There was a full time caretaker who kept the estate clean and tidy, and who had the additional responsibility of ensuring all children were sent home to their parents at 9 o’clock every evening.

There were two club areas on the ground floor, one for adults and one for young children, in addition there was as purpose-built nursery at the rear of the flats, which also housed a childrens’ playground.

For some unknown reason, the Gas Light and Coke Company workers were never actually housed in the flats once built - the property was acquired by a housing trust and let out to the poorer families of the area.

At the start of World War Two, it was decided to provide an air raid shelter for the occupants of Kensal House..

A decision was made to dig up the (beautiful) lawn between the front and rear block of the building (between the two club houses), and consequently a very large hole was dug out in the lawn. When the hole was some 20 to 30 feet deep, someone observed that if a German bomb hit the building, the buildings would collapse over the air raid shelter, and bury those sheltering in them. A panic-stricken authority immediately filled in the costly hole, and began to dig up the rear children’s playground where the shelters were finally constructed. While the entrances to the two shelters were filled in at the end of W.W.2., the actual shelters still exist under the playground.

Contribution by Frank Hatton


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Joan Clarke   
Added: 2 Feb 2021 10:54 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My late aunt Ivy Clarke (nee Burridge) lived with her whole family at 19 Avondale Park Gardens, according to the 1911 census and she was still there in 1937.What was it like in those days, I wonder, if the housing was only built in 1920?


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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:48 GMT   

Mary Place Workhouse
There was a lady called Ivy who lived in the corner she use to come out an tell us kids off for climbing over the fence to play football on the green. Those were the days.

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Comment
charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

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Dave Fahey   
Added: 6 Jan 2021 02:40 GMT   

Bombing of the Jack O Newberry
My maternal grandfather, Archie Greatorex, was the licensee of the Earl of Warwick during the Second World War. My late mother Vera often told the story of the bombing of the Jack. The morning after the pub was bombed, the landlord’s son appeared at the Warwick with the pub’s till on an old pram; he asked my grandfather to pay the money into the bank for him. The poor soul was obviously in shock. The previous night, his parents had taken their baby down to the pub cellar to shelter from the air raids. The son, my mother never knew his name, opted to stay in his bedroom at the top of the building. He was the only survivor. I often wondered what became of him.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 24 Nov 2020 14:25 GMT   

The 1879 Agricultural Show
The 1879 Royal Agricultural Society of England’s annual show was held on an area which later became Queen’s Park and opened on 30 June 1879.

The show ran for a week but the poor weather meant people had to struggle through deep mud and attendances fell disastrously. The visit to the show by Queen Victoria on the fifth day rallied visitors and nearly half the people who visited the show went on that day.

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Comment
GRaleigh   
Added: 23 Feb 2021 09:34 GMT   

Found a bug
Hi all! Thank you for your excellent site. I found an overlay bug on the junction of Glengall Road, NW6 and Hazelmere Road, NW6 on the 1950 map only. It appears when one zooms in at this junction and only on the zoom.

Cheers,
Geoff Raleigh

Source: Glengall Road, NW6

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The Underground Map   
Added: 25 Feb 2021 13:11 GMT   

Glengall Road, NW6
Thanks Geoff!

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Lived here
Brenda Jackson   
Added: 13 Aug 2017 21:39 GMT   

83 Pembroke Road
My Gt Gt grandparents lived at 83 Pembroke Road before it became Granville Road, They were married in 1874, John Tarrant and Maryann Tarrant nee Williamson.

Her brother George Samuel Williamson lived at 95 Pembroke Road with his wife Emily and children in the 1881 Census

Apparently the extended family also lived for many years in Alpha Place, Canterbury Road, Peel Road,

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 28 Dec 2020 08:31 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
I was born in Hammersmith Hospital (Ducane Rd) I lived at 40 Blecynden Street from birth in 1942 to 1967 when I moved due to oncoming demolition for the West way flyover.
A bomb fell locally during the war and cracked one of our windows, that crack was still there the day I left.
It was a great street to have grown up in I have very fond memories of living there.



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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:30 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Went to school St Johns with someone named Barry Green who lived in that St. Use to wait for him on the corner take a slow walk an end up being late most days.

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 8 Jun 2021 08:08 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Lived here #40 1942-1967

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Comment
Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:17 GMT   

Hewer Street W10
John Nodes Undertakers Hewer Street W10

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Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:27 GMT   

Hewer Street, W10
My husband Barry Newton lived over John Nodes in Hewer Street in 1950’s. Barry dad Tom worked for John Nodes and raced pigeons in his spare time Tom and his Lena raised 5 sons there before moving to the Southcoast in the mid 70’s due to Tom ill health

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Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:13 GMT   

St Jude’s Church, Lancefield Street
Saint Jude’s was constructed in 1878, while the parish was assigned in 1879 from the parish of Saint John, Kensal Green (P87/JNE2). The parish was united with the parishes of Saint Luke (P87/LUK1) and Saint Simon (P87/SIM) in 1952. The church was used as a chapel of ease for a few years, but in 1959 it was closed and later demolished.

The church is visible on the 1900 map for the street on the right hand side above the junction with Mozart Street.

Source: SAINT JUDE, KENSAL GREEN: LANCEFIELD STREET, WESTMINSTER | Londo

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Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:08 GMT   

Wedding at St Jude’s Church
On 9th November 1884 Charles Selby and Johanna Hanlon got married in St Jude’s Church on Lancefield Street. They lived together close by at 103 Lancefield Street.
Charles was a Lather, so worked in construction. He was only 21 but was already a widower.
Johanna is not shown as having a profession but this is common in the records and elsewhere she is shown as being an Ironer or a Laundress. It is possible that she worked at the large laundry shown at the top of Lancefield Road on the 1900 map. She was also 21. She was not literate as her signature on the record is a cross.
The ceremony was carried out by William Hugh Wood and was witnessed by Charles H Hudson and Caroline Hudson.

Source: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/1623/images/31280_197456-00100?pId=6694792

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 08:59 GMT   

Spigurnell Road, N17
I was born and lived in Spigurnell Road no 32 from 1951.My father George lived in Spigurnell Road from 1930’s.When he died in’76 we moved to number 3 until I got married in 1982 and moved to Edmonton.Spigurnell Road was a great place to live.Number 32 was 2 up 2 down toilet out the back council house in those days

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Lewis   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 20:48 GMT   

Ploy
Allotment

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

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Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

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Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
29 Rackham Street, W10 29 Rackham Street lay about halfway along on the north side of the street.
3 Acklam Road From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family.
6 East Row, W10 6 East Row was a house along East Row which was demolished in 1960 as part of slum clearance in the area.
Acklam Road protests Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway
Adair Road before redevelopment A photo showing Adair Road’s junction with Golborne Gardens in March 1964.
Admiral Blake (The Cowshed) The Admiral Blake was situated at the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Barlby Road.
Barlby Primary School Barlby Road Primary School has long served the children of North Kensington.
Beethoven Street School Beethoven Street School was opened in 1881 to serve the community of the newly-built Queen's Park Estate.
Chamberlayne Farm Chamberlain (Wood) Farm developed out of the manor of Chambers, named after Richard de Camera, an early 13th century cleric.
Clayton Arms A pub which was situated halfway down West Row in Kensal Town.
Corner of Caird Street and Lancefield Street (1910) The corner of Caird Street with Lancefield Street.
Corner of Rackham Street, Ladbroke Grove (1950) The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them.
Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance is the traditional starting point for the Notting Hill Carnival.
Exmoor Street (1950) Photographed just after the Second World War, looking north along Exmoor Street.
Gas Light and Coke Company The gasometers of the Gas Light and Coke company dominated North Kensington until demolition in the late 20th century.
Graffiti along Acklam Road (1970s) Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway
Harrow Road (1920s) Harrow Road in the 1920s, looking south east towards the Prince of Wales pub and the Emmanuel Church spire.
Hudson’s the chemist (1906) Hudson's, a chemist shop, stood on the corner of Ilbert Street and Third Avenue in the Queen's Park estate.
Jack of Newbury The Jack of Newbury stood at the corner of East Row and Kensal Road until it was bombed on 2 October 1940.
Kensal Green Kensal Green, site of England’s oldest cemetery still in use.
Kensal House There are two Kensal Houses in London W10 - this was the original
Kensal Rise (1907) Motor buses at Kensal Rise station.
Kilburn Lane Farm A farm existed in Kilburn Lane until the 1860s, by which time it had been disrupted by the railway line.
Ladbroke Grove Ladbroke Grove on the corner of St Charles Sqaure taken outside the Eagle public house, looking north, just prior to the outbreak of the Second World War.
Ladbroke Grove looking north (1900) This early 1900s image was taken just south of the junction of Ladbroke Grove and Treverton Street.
Ladbroke Grove railway bridge Looking north over Bartle Bridge in the 1950s
Lads of the Village One of the signature public houses along Kensal Road.
Lancefield Coachworks Lancefield Coachworks was a builder of bespoke bodies for expensive car chassis always introducing sporting elements into designs.
Middle Row School Middle Row School was established in the late 19th century to provide education to the children of Kensal New Town.
Notting Hill Barn Farm Notting Barns Farm was one of two farms in the North Kensington area.
Political meeting (1920s) Meeting in front of the Junction Arms situated where Tavistock Road, Crescent and Basing Road met.
Portobello Arms The Portobello Arms was a former pub in Kensal Town, established in 1842.
Portobello Farm Portobello Farm House was approached along Turnpike Lane, sometimes referred to as Green’s Lane, a track leading from Kensington Gravel Pits towards a wooden bridge over the canal.
Portobello Green Portobello Green features a shopping arcade under the Westway along Thorpe Close, an open-air market under the canopy, and community gardens.
Princess Frederica School Princess Frederica School on the corner of College Road and Purves Road, NW10.
Princess Louise Hospital The Princess Louise Hospital for Children was opened by King George V and Queen Mary in 1928. It had 42 beds, an Out-Patients Department and Dispensary for Sick Women.
Queen’s Park Library Queen’s Park Library was built to improve the minds of the new Queen’s Park Estate residents.
Rackham Street, eastern end (1950) The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them.
Rackham Street, western end (1950) A bombed-out Rackham Street, looking down from the junction with Exmoor Street.
St Charles Hospital The St Marylebone workhouse infirmary was opened in 1881 on Rackham Street, North Kensington and received a congratulatory letter from Florence Nightingale.
St Charles Square after bombing (1950) A corner of St Charles Square looking north, just after the Second World War
St Charles Square ready for redevelopment (1951) Photographed in 1951, the corner of St Charles Square and Ladbroke Grove looking northwest just after the Second World War.
St Charles’ Square Training College (1908) St Charles’ Square Training College/Carmelite Convent.
St Martins Mission Saint Martin's Mission was originally known as Rackham Hall as it was situated on Rackham Street.
St Quintin Park Cricket Ground (1890s) Before the turn of the 20th century, west of present day North Kensington lay fields - the future Barlby Road was the site of the St Quintin Park Cricket Ground.
St. Joseph’s Home St Joseph's dominated a part of Portobello Road up until the 1980s.
The Apollo The Apollo pub was located at 18 All Saints Road, on the southeast corner of the Lancaster Road junction.
The Eagle The Eagle, on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Telford Road.
The Flora The Flora is situated on Harrow Road, W10.
The Foresters The Foresters - a lost pub of London W10
The Mitre The Mitre was situated at 62 Golborne Road.
The Plough From the sixteenth century onwards, the Plough stood beside the Harrow Road.
The Victoria (Narrow Boat) The Victoria later became the Narrow Boat before it burned down.
Wedlake Street Baths In a time when most had somewhere to live but few had somewhere to wash at home, public baths were the place to go...
Western Arms The Western Arms was a pub situated on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Kensal Road.
William Miller’s Yard William Miller's Yard stood in Chapel Place, West Row.

NEARBY STREETS
Absalom Road, W10 Absalom Road was the former name for the western section of Golborne Gardens.
Acklam Road, W10 Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway.
Adair Road, W10 Adair Road is a street on the Kensal Town/North Kensington borders.
Adair Tower, W10 Adair Tower is a post-war tower block on the corner of Adair Road and Appleford Road, W10.
Adela Street, W10 Adela Street is a small cul-de-sac in Kensal Town.
Admiral Mews, W10 Admiral Mews is a small road off Barlby Road, W10.
Alderson Street, W10 Alderson Street is a side street north of Kensal Road.
All Saints Road, W11 Built between 1852-61, All Saints Road is named after All Saints Church on Talbot Road.
Allington Road, W10 Allington Road is a street on the Queen's Park Estate in London W10
Alperton Street, W10 Alperton Street is the first alphabetically named street in the Queen’s Park Estate, W10.
Appleford House, W10 Appleford House is a residential block along Appleford Road.
Appleford Road, W10 Appleford Road was transformed post-war from a Victorian street to one dominated by housing blocks.
Archway Close, W10 Archway Close is a cul-de-sac off of St Mark’s Road, W10.
Ashburnham Road, NW10 Ashburnham Road is a street in Willesden.
Athlone Place, W10 Athlone Place runs between Faraday Road and Bonchurch Road.
Banister Road, W10 Banister Road just scrapes being classed as belonging to the Queen’s Park Estate.
Barfett Street, W10 Barfett Street is a street on the Queen’s Park Estate, W10
Barlby Gardens, W10 Barlby Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Barlby Road, W10 Barlby Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Basing Street, W11 Basing Street was originally Basing Road between 1867 and 1939.
Bassett Road, W10 Bassett Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Bayford Road, NW10 Bayford Road is a street in Willesden.
Beethoven Street, W10 Beethoven Street is a street in the Queen’s Park Estate.
Berens Road, NW10 Berens Road is a location in London.
Bevington Road, W10 Bevington Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Blagrove Road, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode.
Blake Close, W10 Blake Close is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Bolton Gardens, NW10 Bolton Gardens is a street in Willesden.
Bonchurch Road, W10 Bonchurch Road was first laid out in the 1870s.
Bosworth Road, W10 Bosworth Road was the first street built as Kensal New Town started to expand to the east.
Bransford Street, W10 Bransford Street became Porlock Street before vanishing altogether.
Branstone Street, W10 Branstone Street, originally Bramston Street, disappeared in 1960s developments.
Bravington Road, W9 Bravington Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Brewster Gardens, W10 Brewster Gardens is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Briar Walk, W10 Briar Walk lies on the Queen's Park Estate
Bruce Close, W10 Bruce Close replaced the earlier Rackham Street in this part of W10.
Bruckner Street, W10 Bruckner Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Brunel Mews, W10 Brunel Mews, a tiny cul-de-sac, is the northern extension of Sixth Avenue.
Buller Road, W10 Buller Road is a small residential road on the west side of Kilburn Lane.
Burrows Road, NW10 Burrows Road is a street in Willesden.
Caird Street, W10 Caird Street is the ’C’ street on the Queen’s Park Estate
Calderon Place, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Cambridge Gardens, W10 Cambridge Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Canal Close, W10 Canal Close is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Canal Way, W10 Canal Way was built on the site of the Kensal Gas Works.
Chesterton Road, W10 Chesterton Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Claremont Road, W9 Claremont Road runs beside the tracks at Queen’s Park station.
Compton Road, NW10 Compton Road is a street in Willesden.
Conlan Street, W10 Conlan Street is one of the newer roads of Kensal Town.
Coomassie Road, W9 Coomassie Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Dalgarno Gardens, W10 Dalgarno Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Dalgarno Way, W10 Dalgarno Way is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Dart Street, W10 Dart Street runs eastwards from Third Avenue and becomes Marban Road.
Dowland Street, W10 Dowland Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Droop Street, W10 Droop Street is one of the main east-west streets of the Queen’s Park Estate.
East Row, W10 East Row is a road with a long history within Kensal Town.
Edenham Mews, W10 Edenham Mews was the site of a youth club and day nursery after the Second World War until demolition.
Edenham Street, W10 Edenham Street was swept away in 1969.
Edenham Way, W10 Edenham Way is a 1970s street.
Elkstone Road, W10 Elkstone Road replaced Southam Street around 1970.
Enbrook Street, W10 Enbrook Street is another street north of Harrow Road, W10 without a pub.
Exmoor Street, W10 Exmoor Street runs from Barlby Road to St Charles Square, W10
Eynham Road, W12 Eynham Road is a road in the W12 postcode area
Faraday Road, W10 Faraday Road is one of the ’scientist’ roadnames of North Kensington.
Farrant Street, W10 Farrant Street is the missing link in the alphabetti spaghetti of the streetnames of the Queen’s Park Estate
Fermoy Road, W9 Fermoy Road was named in 1883 and partly built up by 1884
Fifth Avenue, W10 Fifth Avenue is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Finstock Road, W10 Finstock Road is a turning out of Oxford Gardens.
First Avenue, W10 First Avenue is street number one in the Queen's Park Estate
Fourth Avenue, W10 Shalfleet Drive is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Galton Street, W10 Galton Street lies within the Queen’s Park Estate, W10.
Glenroy Street, W12 Glenroy Street is a road in the W12 postcode area
Golborne Gardens, W10 Golborne Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Golborne Mews, W10 Golborne Mews lies off of the Portobello Road, W10.
Golborne Road, W10 Golborne Road, heart of North Kensington, was named after Dean Golbourne, at one time vicar of St. John’s Church in Paddington.
Golden Mews, W11 Golden Mews was a tiny mews off of Basing Street, W11.
Halstow Road, NW10 Halstow Road was laid out in the 1890s.
Harrow Road, NW10 Harrow Road is a location in London.
Harrow Road, W10 Harrow Road is a main road through London W10.
Harvist Road, NW10 Harvist Road is a street in Willesden.
Harvist Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Hawthorn Walk, W10 Queen's Park Estate
Hazlewood Crescent, W10 Hazlewood Crescent, much altered by 1970s redevelopment, is an original road of the area.
Hazlewood Tower, W10 Hazlewood Tower is a skyscraper in North Kensington, London W10.
Heather Walk, W10 Heather Walk lies in the Queen’s Park Estate
Herries Street, W10 Herries Street is a street in the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Hewer Street, W10 Built as part of the St Charles’ estate in the 1870s, it originally between Exmoor Street to a former street called Raymede Street.
Highlever Road, W10 Highlever Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Hiley Road, NW10 Hiley Road is a street in Willesden.
Hill Farm Road, W10 Hill Farm Road is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Hormead Road, W9 Hormead Road was named in 1885 although its site was still a nursery ground until 1891.
Humber Drive, W10 Humber Drive is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Huxley Street, W10 Huxley Street is the only street beginning with an H on the Queen’s Park Estate.
Ilbert Street, W10 Ilbert Street is the ’I’ street on the Queen’s Park Estate, W10
James Collins Close, W9 James Collins Close is a street in Maida Vale.
James House, W10 James House is a residential block in Appleford Road.
John Fearon Walk, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Kelfield Gardens, W10 Kelfield Gardens is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Kelfield Mews, W10 Kelfield Mews is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Kempe Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Kensal Place, W10 Kensal Place ran from Southam Street to Kensal Road.
Kensal Road, W10 Kensal Road, originally called Albert Road, is the heart of Kensal Town.
Kilburn Lane, NW6 Kilburn Lane is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Kilburn Lane, W10 Kilburn Lane runs around the edge of the Queen’s Park Estate in London W10.
Kilburn Lane, W9 Kilburn Lane is a street in Maida Vale.
Kilravock Street, W10 Kilravock Street is a street on the Queen’s Park Estate, London W10
Kingsbridge Road, W10 Kingsbridge Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Ladbroke Grove, W10 Ladbroke Grove runs from Notting Hill in the south to Kensal Green in the north, and straddles the W10 and W11 postal districts.
Lancefield Street, W10 Lancefield Street runs from Caird Street to Bruckner Street.
Langler Road, NW10 Langler Road is a street in Willesden.
Latimer Place, W10 Latimer Place is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Lavie Mews, W10 Lavie Mews, W10 was a mews connecting Portobello Road and Murchison Road.
Linden Avenue, NW10 Linden Avenue is a street in Willesden.
Lionel Mews, W10 Lionel Mews was built around 1882 and probably disappeared in the 1970s.
Lothrop Street, W10 Lothrop Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Malton Mews, W10 Malton Mews, formerly Oxford Mews, runs south off of Cambridge Gardens.
Manchester Drive, W10 Manchester Drive is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Maple Walk, W10 Post war development on the Queen’s Park Estate created some plant-based street names.
Marban Road, W9 Marban Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Marne Street, W10 Marne Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Matthew Close, W10 Matthew Close is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Maxilla Walk, W10 Maxilla Walk is a street in North Kensington, London W10
McGregor Road, W11 McGregor Road runs between St Luke’s Road and All Saints Road.
Methwold Road, W10 Methwold Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Middle Row, W10 Middle Row is one of the original streets laid out as Kensal New Town.
Millwood Street, W10 Millwood Street is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Morgan Road, W10 Morgan Road connects Wornington Road and St Ervans Road.
Mortimer Road, NW10 Mortimer Road is a street in Willesden.
Mortmimer Road, NW10 Mortmimer Road is a location in London.
Mozart Street, W10 Mozart Street was part of the second wave of development of the Queen’s Park Estate.
Munro Mews, W10 Munro Mews is a part cobbled through road that connects Wornington Road and Wheatstone Road.
Murchison Road, W10 Murchison Road existed for just under 100 years.
Norburn Street, W10 Norburn Street is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
North Pole Road, W10 North Pole Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Nursery Lane, W10 Nursery Lane is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Nutbourne Street, W10 Nutbourne Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, W10
Oakworth Road, W10 Oakworth Road dates from the 1920s when a cottage estate was built by the council.
Octavia House, W10 Octavia House on Southern Row was built in the late 1930s.
Oliphant Street, W10 Oliphant Street was the final alphabetical street on the original Queen’s Park Estate naming scheme.
Onslow Close, W10 Onslow Close is in the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Orchard Close, W10 Orchard Close is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Oxford Gardens, W10 Oxford Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Pangbourne Avenue, W10 Pangbourne Avenue is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Park Mews, W10 Park Mews is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Parry Road, W10 Parry Road is on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Peach Road, W10 Paach Road is one of the newer streets of the Queen’s Park Estate in London W10
Pember Road, NW10 Pember Road is one of the side streets to the west of Kilburn Lane, NW10
Portnall Road, W9 Portnall Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Portobello Road, W10 Portobello Road is split into two sections by the Westway/Hammersmith and City line.
Pressland Street, W10 Pressland Street ran from Kensal Road to the canal.
Purves Road, NW10 Purves Road is named after the solicitor of the United Land Company who were developers in this area.
Rackham Street, W10 Rackham Street is a road that disappeared from the streetscape of London W10 in 1951.
Raddington Road, W10 Raddington Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Rainham Road, NW10 Rainham Road, in Kensal Green, was laid out in 1895.
Raymede Street, W10 Raymede Street, after severe bomb damage in the area, disappeared after 1950.
Regent Street, NW10 Regent Street, otherwise an obscure side street is one of the oldest roads in Kensal Green.
Rendle Street, W10 Rendle Street ran from Murchison Road to Telford Road.
Ronan Walk, W10 Ronan Walk was one of the streets constructed in a 1970s build parallel to the Harrow Road.
Rootes Drive, W10 Rootes Drive is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Salters Road, W10 Salters Road lies on the site of an old playground.
Second Avenue, W10 Second Avenue is one of the streets of the Queen's Park Estate, W10
Selby Square, W10 Selby Square is a walkway in the Queen’s Park Estate
Severn Avenue, W10 Severn Avenue is a newer thoroughfare in the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Shrewsbury Street, W10 Shrewsbury Street is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Silvester Mews, W11 Silvester Mews was a mews off of Basing Street, W11.
Sixth Avenue, W10 Sixth Avenue is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Snarsgate Street, W10 Snarsgate Street is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Southam House, W10 Southam House is situated on Adair Road.
Southam Street, W10 Southam Street was made world-famous in the photographs of Roger Mayne.
Southern Row, W10 Southern Row was originally South Row to match the other streets in the neighbourhood.
St Charles Place, W10 St Charles Place is a street in North Kensington, London W10
St Charles Square, W10 St Charles Square is a street in North Kensington, London W10
St Columbs House, W10 St Columbs House is situated at 9-39 Blagrove Road.
St Ervans Road, W10 St Ervans Road is named after the home town of the Rev. Samuel Walker.
St Helens Gardens, W10 St Helens Gardens seems to date from the 1860s.
St Johns Terrace, W10 St Johns Terrace is a street in North Kensington, London W10
St Joseph’s Close, W10 St Joseph’s Close is a cul-de-sac off of Bevington Road.
St Lawrence Terrace, W10 St Lawrence Terrace is a street in North Kensington, London W10
St Margaret’s Road, NW10 St Margaret’s Road is a road in the NW10 postcode area
St Margaret’s Road, NW10 St Margaret’s Road is a road in the BR3 postcode area
St Marks Road, W10 St Marks Road lies partly in W10 and partly in W11.
St Mark’s Road, W10 St Mark’s Road extends beyond the Westway into the W10 area.
St Michael’s Gardens, W10 St Michael’s Gardens lies to the south of St Michael’s Church.
St Quintin Avenue, W10 St Quintin Avenue connects North Pole Road with the roundabout at the top of St Mark’s Road.
St Quintin Gardens, W10 St Quintin Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Stansbury Square, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Sunbeam Crescent, W10 Sunbeam Crescent is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Sutton Way, W10 Sutton Way is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Sycamore Walk, W10 Queen's Park Estate
Symphony Mews, W10 Symphony Mews is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Tavistock Crescent, W11 Tavistock Crescent was where the first Notting Hill Carnival procession began on 18 September 1966.
Tavistock Road, W11 Tavistock Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Telford Road, W10 Telford Road is one of the local streets named after prominent nineteenth century scientists.
The Quadrant, W10 The Quadrant is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Third Avenue, W10 Third Avenue is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Thorpe Close, W10 Thorpe Close is a redevelopment of the former Thorpe Mews, laid waste by the building of the Westway.
Tolhurst Drive, W10 Tolhurst Drive is a street in the Queen's Park Estate
Tollbridge Close, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Trellick Tower, W10 Trellick Tower is a 31-storey block of flats designed in the Brutalist style by architect Ernő Goldfinger, completed in 1972.
Treverton Street, W10 Treverton Street, a street which survived post war redevelopment.
Verdi Crescent, W10 Verdi Crescent is a post-war development, lying off of Herries Street.
Wakeman Road, NW10 Wakeman Road is a street in Willesden.
Wallingford Avenue, W10 Wallingford Avenue is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Warfield Road, NW10 Warfield Road is a street in Willesden.
Webb Close, W10 Webb Close is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Wedlake Street, W10 Wedlake Street arrived as the second wave of building in Kensal Town was completed.
Wellington Road, NW10 Wellington Road commemorates the Duke of Wellington.
West Row, W10 West Row, W10 began its life in the early 1840s.
Western Dwellings, W10 Western Dwellings were a row of houses, opposite the Western Gas Works, housing some of the workers.
Westview Close, W10 Westview Close is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Westway, W10 Westway is the A40(M) motorway which runs on an elevated section along the W10/W11 border.
Wheatstone Road, W10 Wheatstone Road was the former name of the eastern section of Bonchurch Road.
Wornington Road, W10 Wornington Road connected Golborne Road with Ladbroke Grove, though the Ladbroke end is now closed to through traffic.

NEARBY PUBS
Admiral Blake (The Cowshed) The Admiral Blake was situated at the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Barlby Road.
Albion The Albion stopped being a pub early.
Ariadne’s Nectar Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Brittania The Brittania disappeared as Trellick Tower began to take shape.
Chilled Eskimo This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Clayton Arms A pub which was situated halfway down West Row in Kensal Town.
Earl of Warwick The Earl of Warwick stood at 36 Golborne Road.
Falcon This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Jack of Newbury The Jack of Newbury stood at the corner of East Row and Kensal Road until it was bombed on 2 October 1940.
Kensal Community Centre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lads of the Village One of the signature public houses along Kensal Road.
Mau Mau This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Parlour This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Portobello Arms The Portobello Arms was a former pub in Kensal Town, established in 1842.
Portobello House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Apollo The Apollo pub was located at 18 All Saints Road, on the southeast corner of the Lancaster Road junction.
The Eagle The Eagle, on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Telford Road.
The Earl Derby The Earl Derby stood on the corner of Southern Row and Bosworth Road.
The Flora The Flora is situated on Harrow Road, W10.
The Foresters The Foresters - a lost pub of London W10
The Mitre The Mitre was situated at 62 Golborne Road.
The Paradise This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Plough From the sixteenth century onwards, the Plough stood beside the Harrow Road.
The Prince of Wales A pub in Kensal Town
The Victoria (Narrow Boat) The Victoria later became the Narrow Boat before it burned down.
The Whippet Inn This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Western Arms The Western Arms was a pub situated on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Kensal Road.
William IV This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


North Kensington

North Kensington lies either side of Ladbroke Grove, W10.

North Kensington was rural until the 19th century, when it was developed as a suburb with quite large homes. By the 1880s, too many houses had been built for the upper-middle class towards whom the area was aimed. Large houses were divided into low cost flats which often degenerated into slums, as documented in the photographs of Roger Mayne.

During the 1980s, the area started to be gentrified although areas in the north west of the district at Ladbroke Grove and Westbourne Park remain deprived and run down to this day.

Waves of immigrants have arrived for at least a century. This constant renewal of the population makes the area one of the most cosmopolitan in London.

The Notting Hill carnival was first staged in 1964 as a way for the local Afro-Caribbean communities to celebrate their own cultures and traditions. After some rough times in the 1970s and 1980s when it became associated with social protest, violence and huge controversy over policing tactics, this is now Europe’s largest carnival/festival event and a major event in the London calendar. It is staged every August over the Bank holiday weekend.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Coronation street party, 1953.
TUM image id: 1545250697
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The "Western"
TUM image id: 1489498043
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Ladbroke Grove (1866)
TUM image id: 1513618275
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Clayton Arms
TUM image id: 1453029104
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Foresters
TUM image id: 1453071112
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Lads of the Village pub
TUM image id: 1556874496
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Prince of Wales
TUM image id: 1556874951
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Admiral Blake (The Cowshed)
TUM image id: 1556888887
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Kensington Park Hotel
TUM image id: 1453375720
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Albion, now in residential use.
TUM image id: 1556404154
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Coronation street party, 1953.
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To View or share the image, go to its dedicated web page

The "Western"
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Ladbroke Grove (1866)
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Clayton Arms
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The Earl Derby stood on the corner of Southern Row and Bosworth Road. The Earl Derby himself was Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby who fought at the battle of Bosworth.
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The Foresters
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The Lads of the Village pub
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The Prince of Wales
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Admiral Blake (The Cowshed)
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Photographed just after the Second World War, this is the bombed-out Rackham Street, London W10 looking down from the junction with Exmoor Street.
Credit: Kensington and Chelsea library
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