Melville Place, N1

An area which may have existed since the nineteenth century or before with housing mainly dating from the 1970s

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(51.54022 -0.0959, 51.54 -0.095) 
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Road · Essex Road · N1 ·
August
12
2017

Melville Place is a road in the N1 postcode area





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

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Born here
Vanessa Whitehouse   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 22:48 GMT   

Born here
My dad 1929 John George Hall

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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Jeff Owen   
Added: 19 Mar 2021 13:49 GMT   

Swift House, N16
Swift House was completed in 1956. I moved into No 12 when it was brand new. The bock consisted of 12 residences. The six on the ground floor were three bedroomed maisonettes with gardens. The six on the top floor were a mixture of two bedroomed flats (2), one bedroomed flats (2) and what were then called "one unit" flats (2) which were in fact bedsits. There was a similar block opposite named Dryden House (all the flats on the Hawksley Court Estate were named after famous writers). It was a lovely flat which my Mum & Dad cherished, having moved from two rooms which they’d had since they were married.

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Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 15:44 GMT   

Memories of "The Londesborough"
I lived in Sandbrook Road from 1956 until 1964 and then in Harcombe Road until 1994. “The Londesborough” was my local in my formative drinking years.

It was a pub typical of its time. Clean and tidy and well run by a proper guv’nor who stood no nonsense. It had a single island bartop serving three separate bars. The Public Bar had its door on the corner of Londesborough Road and had a dart board. The other two shared a single entrance on the right as you look at the pub. The Saloon bar formed the majority of the pub and was the most plush. It extended to the back of the premises with the back portion ’ at a slightly lower level ’ housing a full size snooker table. The small Private bar was between the other two. I recall that prices were a penny or two more in the Saloon bar.

The first landlord I remember was Bob Baker. He and his wife Else ran the pub until about 1969-ish. Bob was a retired coalminer from Leicester. He had two daughters - Penny and Jane ’ who would very occasionally work behind the bar. Bob had a full time live-in barman/cellarman by the name of Gwyn Evans, who could be a bit temperamental at times! My Dad also worked there from time to time and I recall being invited upstairs to watch the 1961 FA Cup Final between Spurs and Leicester City. Following Bob’s retirement Lou Levine and his wife Pearl took the helm. Lou was a fine guv’nor and the pub flourished under his tenancy. When I left the area I believe Lou still had the tenancy but had put a manager, whose name I cannot recall, in overall charge.

Saturday evening and Sunday lunchtimes the pub was packed. But it also had a good patronage during the week. Among the occasional visitors was Eric Bristow, the late world champion darts player. Eric would challenge the locals to a game and would even things up a bit by throwing his darts from the kneeling position! Footballer and former England manager Terry Venables could also be found there from time to time as one of his pals was the son of Lou’s business partner.

The pub has certainly gone upmarket (as has that small area) but I will take issue with one claim made on its website: “In the 1960’s, the Londesborough was one of the pubs that the notorious Kray Twins took a drink in.” My Dad knew just about everybody who “took a drink” in the Londesborough in the 1960s and Bob Baker knew absolutely everybody. We often spoke about the Kray twins (their “manor” was the other side of Stoke Newington High Street). No mention of them visiting the pub was ever made by them or any other of the locals. One other slight correction: the map on this website is slightly incorrect. The pub is on the corner of Londesborough Road and Barbauld Road, and not as indicated.

The pub had one big drawback. It was a "Watneys" Pub. But you can’t have everything!

Source: The Londesborough

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Comment
Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

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STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

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Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 19 Mar 2021 15:28 GMT   

Galsworthy Terrace, N16
Galsworthy Terrace was opposite Swift House, where I lived from 1956 to 1964. My pal Roger Beamish lived at No 1, just adjacent to the slope which joins Sandbrook Road to Woodlea Road. When I first lived there the plot that now accommodates Stowe House was a rock garden containing a wide flight of steps and a sloped pathway. Other occupants of Galsworthy Terrace were the Lake family, good friends with my Mum, and the Walker family. Mr Walker ran the Hawksley Court Tenants’ Club for many years and he would organise an annual "beano" usually to Margate.

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Comment
Jack Wilson   
Added: 21 Jun 2022 21:40 GMT   

Penfold Printers
I am seeking the location of Penfold Printers Offices in Dt Albans place - probably about 1870 or so

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Reply
Erin   
Added: 2 May 2022 01:33 GMT   

Windsor Terrace, N1
hello

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

Reply
Comment
Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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Comment
ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

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Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


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Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

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Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

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Comment
Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Collins’ Music Hall Collins’ Music Hall was a notable Islington venue.
Islington Islington grew as a sprawling Middlesex village along the line of the Great North Road, and has provided the name of the modern borough.

NEARBY STREETS
Abbotts Close, N1 Abbott’s Close was built off of Alwyne Road in 1955.
Aberystwyth Terrace, N1 Aberystwyth Terrace was a named terrace at the junction of New North Road and Shepperton Road.
Almeida Street, N1 Almeida Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Alwyne Lane, N1 Alwyne Lane is a road in the N1 postcode area
Alwyne Place, N1 Alwyne Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Alwyne Road, N1 Alwyne Road is a road in the N1 postcode area
Alwyne Villas, N1 Alwyne Villas is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Anderson Square, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Arran Walk, N1 Arran Walk is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Ashby Grove, N1 This is a street in the N1 postcode area
Ashby House Road, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Baring Street, N1 Baring Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Barnston Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Basier Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Basire Street, N1 Basire Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Battishill Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Bennet Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Bentham Court, N1 Bentham Court is located on Essex Road
Bishop Street, N1 Bishop Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Bouton Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Braes Street, N1 Braes Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Brampton House, N1 Residential block
Britannia Row, N1 Britannia Row is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Burton Bank, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Caldy Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Canon Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Canonbury Business Centre, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Canonbury Crescent, N1 Canonbury Crescent is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Canonbury Grove, N1 Canonbury Grove is a road in the N1 postcode area
Canonbury Lane, N1 Canonbury Lane is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Canonbury Road, N1 Canonbury Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Canonbury Square, N1 Canonbury Square is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Canonbury Street, N1 Canonbury Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Canonbury Villas, N1 Canonbury Villas is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cardigan Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Church Road, N1 Church Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Clare Lane, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Colebrooke Place, N1 Colebrooke Place is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Coleman Fields, N1 Coleman Fields is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Collins Yard, N1 Collins Yard is so-named as it ran alongside the Collins’ Music Hall giving access to the rear of the hall.
Compton Avenue, N1 Compton Avenue is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Coopers Yard, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Copford Walk, N1 Copford Walk is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cross Street, N1 Cross Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Crowland Terrace, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Cruden Street, N1 Cruden Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Dagmar Passage, N1 Dagmar Passage is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Dagmar Terrace, N1 Dagmar Terrace is a road in the N1 postcode area
Dengie Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Dibden Street, N1 Dibden Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Douglas Road, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Draper Place, N1 Draper Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Ecclesbourne Road, N1 Ecclesbourne Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Edward’s Cottages, N1 Edward’s Cottages is a road in the N1 postcode area
Elder Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Elizabeth Avenue, N1 Elizabeth Avenue is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Elmore Street, N1 Elmore Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Eric Fletcher Court Road, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Eric Fletcher Court, N1 Eric Fletcher Court is a block on Canonbury Crescent
Essex Road, N1 Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, had a country house here in the sixteenth century where he often entertained Queen Elizabeth I.
Esther Anne Place, N1 Esther Anne Place is a location in London.
Fairstead Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Florence Street, N1 Florence Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Florence Works, N1 Florence Works is a road in the N1 postcode area
Fowler Road, N1 Fowler Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Gaskin Street, N1 Gaskin Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Greenman Street, N1 Greenman Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Gulland Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Halliford Street, N1 Halliford Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Halton Cross Street, N1 Halton Cross Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Halton Road, N1 Halton Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Hawes Street, N1 Hawes Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Hawkwell Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Hedingham Close, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Holland Passage, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Horse Yard, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Hullbridge Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Islington Place, N1 Islington Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
James Morgan Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Jordan Path, N1 Jordan Path is a location in London.
Laundry Lane, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Lazer Road, N1 Lazer Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Lindsey Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Linton Street, N1 Linton Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Mary Street, N1 Mary Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Maryland Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Morton Road, N1 Morton Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Northampton Street, N1 Northampton Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Orchard Close, N1 Orchard Close is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Packington Street, N1 Packington Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Peabody Square, N1 Peabody Square is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Peabody Yard, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Peldon Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Pied Bull Yard, N1 Pied Bull Yard is a small Islington turning.
Pleasant Place, N1 Pleasant Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Popham Road, N1 Popham Road is a street in London
Popham Street, N1 Popham Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Prebend Street, N1 Prebend Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Price House, N1 Residential block
Providence Court, N1 Providence Court is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Providence Place, N1P Providence Place lies beside the Screen On The Green.
Queens Head Street, N1 Queens Head Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Queensbury Street, N1 Queensbury Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Raleigh Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Rawreth Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Raynor Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Rector Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Red House Square, N1 Red House Square is a road in the N1 postcode area
Rees Street, N1 Rees Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Richmond Grove, N1 Richmond Grove is a road in the N1 postcode area
Ridgewell Close, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
River Place Health Centre, N1 River Place Health Centre is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
River Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Rotherfield Street, N1 Rotherfield Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Rydon Street, N1 Rydon Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Sable Street, N1 Sable Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Sebbon Street, N1 Sebbon Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Shepperton House, N1 Residential block
Shepperton Road, N1 Shepperton Road runs south east from New North Road.
Sherborne Street, N1 Sherborne Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Shillingford Street, N1 Shillingford Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Shrubbery Close, N1 Shrubbery Close is a road in the N1 postcode area
Spellbrook Walk, N1 Spellbrook Walk is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Spencer Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
St Paul Street, N1 St Paul Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
St. Mary’s Path, N1 St. Mary’s Path is a road in the N1 postcode area
St. Pauls Road, N1 Baring Court is a block in N1.
Steeple Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Studd Street, N1 This is a street in the N1 postcode area
Terling Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Terretts Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
The Ivories, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
The Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Tibberton Square, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Tibberton Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Times Chambers, N1 Times Chambers is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Tower Court, N1 Tower Court is a block on Canonbury Street
Tressel Close, N1 Tressel Close is a road in the N1 postcode area
Tressell Close, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Tyndale Lane, N1 Tyndale Lane is a road in the N1 postcode area
Tyndale Terrace, N1 Tyndale Terrace is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Upper Dengie Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Upper Gulland Walk, N1 Upper Gulland Walk is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Upper Hawkwell Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Upper Rawreth Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Upper Street, N1 Upper Street begins at the junction of Pentonville Road and City Road, runs northwards past Angel, splits at Islington Green, ending at Highbury Corner.
Wakelin House, N1 Wakelin House is a block on Tressel Close
Walters House Road, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Waterloo Terrace, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Wicks Place, N1 Wicks Place is a location in London.
Willow Bridge Road, N1 Willow Bridge Road is a road in the N1 postcode area
Wilton Square, N1 This is a street in the N1 postcode area
Wilton Villas, N1 Wilton Villas is a road in the N1 postcode area
Windsor Street, N1 Windsor Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Wontner Close, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Yeate Street, N1 Yeate Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Bar Prague This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Blackhorse Road Cote is a licenced premise on Islington Green.
Central Station This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Compton Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Dead Doll’s House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
DogEatDog This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Duchess of Kent This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Four Sisters This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Fox on the Green The Fox on the Green is one of Islington’s oldest pubs.
Hoxley and Porter This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
John Salt This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Kings Head This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lucky Voice This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Marquess Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Myddleton Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
New Rose This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Tap Room This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Baring This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Bull This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Hope And Anchor This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The London Cocktail Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Lord Clyde This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Smokehouse This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Vineyard This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Wenlock & Essex This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Essex Road

Essex Road railway station is the only deep level underground station in London served solely by National Rail trains.

The station was opened on 14 February 1904 by the Great Northern & City Railway (GN&CR) on its underground route between the Great Northern Railway (GNR) station at Finsbury Park and the Metropolitan Railway (MR) and City & South London Railway (C&SLR) station at Moorgate in the City of London.

The GN&CR was intended to carry main line trains and the tunnels were constructed with a larger diameter (4.9 m) than the other deep tube railways being built at that time (roughly 3.4 m to 3.7 m). From 1913, the MR took control of the GN&CR and ran it under its own name until it became part of the London Passenger Transport Board (LPTB) in 1933.

Between 1922 and 1948 the station name was Canonbury & Essex Road. The name reverted to the original form in 1948.

In preparation for the LPTB's 'Northern Heights' plan the line was transferred to the control of the Morden-Edgware Line (now the Northern Line).

The Northern Heights plan involved the building of a connection to the surface platforms at Finsbury Park and the transfer of a London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) branch from there to Edgware, High Barnet and Alexandra Palace. By 1939 much of the work for the connection of the lines had been done and the opening of the connection was scheduled for autumn 1940 but the start of World War II put a halt to further construction. After the war the uncompleted parts of the plan were cancelled and Northern Line trains continued to run to Drayton Park on what became known as the Northern City Line or, from 1970, the Northern Line Highbury Branch.

The station was, from the early 1960s, closed on Sundays. In the 1970s it was also closed on Saturdays.

On 4 October 1975 the Northern City Line was closed (due to its weekend closure, Essex Road closed the day before) and ceased to be part of the London Underground. The line was transferred to British Rail (BR) and the unused connection between Drayton Park and Finsbury Park from the cancelled Northern Heights plan finally received the tracks to connect the line to the surface platforms at Finsbury Park. On 8 August 1976, the City Line reopened as part of the BR network with mainline size trains running to Old Street. On 8 November 1976, seventy-two years after the GN&CR first opened, the line was opened fully for mainline trains from Moorgate to Finsbury Park and beyond as had been originally intended.

By comparison with other underground stations built at the beginning of the 20th century, the station's surface building is nondescript and unremarkable. Unlike many other central London underground stations, Essex Road was never modernised with escalators and access to the platforms is by lift or a spiral staircase. The station also lacks the automatic ticket gates present at most London Underground and many National Rail stations.

At the lower level the lifts and staircase (of 157 steps) are connected to the platforms via a passageway and a short staircase rising between the two tunnels. The Underground's former operation of the station is evident from the unused and rusty fourth rail which once provided a return of the current from the tube trains serving the line. The third rail is still in use, with return now through the running rails.

Essex Road is a station on the proposed Chelsea-Hackney line.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Highbury Corner
TUM image id: 1489497654
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The Angel, Islington (c.1890)
TUM image id: 1557162442
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In the neighbourhood...

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The Camden Head, Islington This is a glorious old gin palace-style pub behind Upper Street, in existence since the 18th century.
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Collins Theatre of Varieties (Collins’ Music Hall) existed in Islington between 1861 and 1958. Old-time ’greats’ who performed there were numerous: Charles Chaplin, Fred Karno, Kate Carney, Gus Elen, Sir George Robey, Marie Lloyd, Albert Chevalier, Nellie Wallace, Sir Harry Lauder, ’Wee’ Georgie Wood and more.
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Islington Green (1905). That is Upper Street, leading to Highbury Corner. To the right of the green but just out of the picture would be Essex Road (formerly Lower Road)
Old London postcard
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Upper Street, Highbury c.1900
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Collins’ Music Hall in Islington. The music hall was a conversion of a pub called the Lansdowne Arms and was created by the Irish vocalist and music hall entertainer Sam Collins, whose real name was Sam Vagg. It opened on Wednesday 4 November 1863 and was situated at the rear of the pub. Sadly Sam Collins only ran it for two and a half years before his death in 1865. It had a very interesting subsequent history - too detailed for a photo caption - and burnt down in 1958.
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