Thirlmere Road, DA7

Road in/near Crayford, existing between 1932 and now

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Road · Crayford · DA7 ·
November
30
2017

Thirlmere Road runs between Coniston Road and Grasmere Road.

Thirlmere is the name of a reservoir in Allerdale, Cumbria. The Helvellyn ridge lies to the east of Thirlmere.

Thirlmere occupies the site of a former natural lake. In the 19th century Manchester Corporation constructed a dam at the northern end, flooding the valley bottom, and creating a reservoir to provide the growing industrial city of Manchester with water supplies via the Thirlmere Aqueduct.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
Andrew MacFarlane   
Added: 25 Nov 2020 11:22 GMT   

my time at Mayplace road school
started at mayplace in 1938 the teachers were Mr English headmaster Miss Clark,Bress,and miss Black
I lived 200 yards from the school

Reply

LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

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Lived here
Julie   
Added: 22 Sep 2022 18:30 GMT   

Well Walk, NW3 (1817 - 1818)
The home of Benthy, the Postman, with whom poet John Keats and his brother Tom lodged from early 1817 to Dec., 1818. They occupied the first floor up. Here Tom died Dec. 1, 1818. It was next door to the Welles Tavern then called ’The Green Man’."

From collected papers and photos re: No. 1 Well Walk at the library of Harvard University.

Source: No. 1, Well Walk, Hampstead. | HOLLIS for

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 4 Sep 2022 15:42 GMT   

Superman 2
I worked here in 1977. The scene in the prison laundry in Superman 2 was filmed here.

Reply

TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 15:19 GMT   

Bus makes a leap
A number 78 double-decker bus driven by Albert Gunter was forced to jump an accidentally opening Tower Bridge.

He was awarded a £10 bonus.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:44 GMT   

The world’s first underground train
The very first underground train left Paddington on the new Metropolitan Railway bound for Farringdon Street.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:41 GMT   

Baker Street
Baker Street station opened on the Metropolitan Railway - the world’s first underground line.

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Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:17 GMT   

TV comes to Olympia
Over 7000 people queued to see the first high definition television pictures on sets at the Olympia Radio Show. The pictures were transmitted by the BBC from Alexandra Palace, introduced by Leslie Mitchell, their first announcer.

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NEARBY STREETS
Alberta Road, DA8 Alberta Road is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Appledore Avenue, DA7 Appledore Avenue was built as part of the ’Barnehurst Park Estate’ of New Ideal Homesteads Ltd.
Barnehurst Avenue, DA7 Barnehurst Avenue runs north from Merewood Road up to the Erith Road.
Barnehurst Avenue, DA8 Barnehurst Avenue is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Barnehurst Close, DA8 Barnehurst Close is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Beckton Place, DA8 Beckton Place is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Becton Place, DA8 Becton Place is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Beechcroft Avenue, DA7 Beechcroft Avenue is one of a series of north-south roads named alphabetically.
Brook Vale, DA8 Brook Vale is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Castleton Avenue, DA7 Castleton Avenue is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Colyers Close, DA8 Colyers Close is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Coniston Close, DA7 Coniston Close is a small cul-de-sac lying off of Coniston Road.
Coniston Road, DA7 Coniston Road was laid out by the W H Wedlock company in 1932.
Courtleet Drive, DA8 Courtleet Drive is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Dalmeny Road, DA8 Dalmeny Road is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Doris Avenue, DA8 A street within the DA8 postcode
East Holme, DA8 East Holme is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Erith Road, DA8 Erith Road is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Fairford Avenue, DA7 Fairford Avenue is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Grasmere Road, DA7 Grasmere Road runs from Erith Road to Merewood Road.
Heath Way, DA8 Heath Way is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Heathway, DA8 Heathway is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Hilary Close, DA7 Hilary Close is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Homer Close, DA7 Homer Close is a road lying off of Grasmere Road.
Hornbeam Lane, DA7 Hornbeam Lane provides access to the car park of Barnehurst station.
Lingwood, DA7 Lingwood is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Merewood Road, DA7 Merewood Road runs east from Erith Road.
Northall Road, DA7 Northall Road is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Northumberland Way, DA7 Northumberland Way is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Old Manor Way, DA7 Old Manor Way is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Peartree Close, DA7 A street within the DA8 postcode
Rydal Drive, DA7 Rydal Drive is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Three Corners, DA7 Three Corners is a road in the DA7 postcode area
west Holme, DA8 west Holme is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Windermere Road, DA7 Windermere Road is named for the largest lake in England.

NEARBY PUBS
The Red Barn This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


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Crayford

Crayford was combined with other local areas to form the London Borough of Bexley in 1965.


Crayford has a long and interesting history. The area was first mentioned in the Anglo Saxon Chronicle (c.891 - 924), which states that the Britons fought the Jutes at the Battle of Creganford in 457. The Domesday Book (1086) records that in Crayford "there is a church", implying that there was a well established settlement in the area by that time. The Norman Church of St Paulinus, which still stands on top of Crayford Hill overlooking the town, was built in 1100.

The original stimulus for settlement in the area was the fact that the River Cray could be forded at this point - and "Cray-ford" became the settlement’s name.

Crayford Manor House stands just to the north-west of St Paulinus Church, probably in roughly the same position as the first manor house, which was established in the 14th century. Crayford actually contained two manors, those of Howbury and Newbury.

Several large houses once stood in the area, including Oakwood, Shenstone and May Place. Little evidence remains of these, although part of the last house called May Place is now incorporated into the clubhouse of Barnehurst Golf Course.

The house was for many years the seat of the lord of the manor and between 1694 and 1707 was the home of Sir Cloudesley Shovell (1650 - 1707), Commander in Chief of the Navy who took part in the capture of Gibraltar in 1704 during the War of the Spanish Succession. Three years later, after his ship the Association was wrecked off the Isles of Scilly, he was strangled for the rings he wore, by a fisherwoman.

The presence of the river in the town led to the growth of industries such as tanning and silk-making, which need a constant supply of free-flowing fresh water. The tannery has long since gone, but the silk-printing works of David Evans Ltd, established in 1843, remain in the town. Swaislands was another long-established local printing firm. It was taken over by GP & J Baker who closed the works only in 1961.

In the early years of the 19th century the huge armaments firm Vickers, originally from Sheffield, moved into the area. In the few short years of the First World War Vickers’ workforce grew from 300 to 14,000. Vickers built an estate, the Crayford Garden Suburb, to the east of the town to house the armaments workers. Whilst all that remains of the Vickers factory today is the clocktower, surrounded by modern retail development, the houses are still very much in evidence and are sought after as homes because of the quality of construction. This area, which borders on Dartford and the County of Kent, became known as Barnes Cray after a prominent local family (the Barnes).

Other industries in the area included barge building in Crayford Creek, brickmaking and motor-car production by the Siddeley Autocar Company, which had its registered works at Crayford in 1902.

After the First World War the production of armaments was reduced, but industry continued to thrive and the local community prospered on the trade brought to the area as a result of the influx of workers during the war. The Princesses Theatre, opened in 1916 on the riverside, was built specifically to entertain these workers but unfortunately burnt to the ground within six months. It was subsequently rebuilt to exactly the same specifications but presumably with improved fire-protection measures!

In 1920 Crayford became an urban district. As in most other local areas, the 1930s saw a period of busy housebuilding, although this was perhaps not as extensive in Crayford as it was elsewhere. Houses were built mostly by local builders such as New Ideal Homesteads and W.H. Wedlock.

The population in the urban district almost doubled in the 20 years to 1951, from 15,896 in 1931 to 27,950 in 1951.

Housebuilding was interrupted by the Second World War, which affected Crayford badly because the presence of the Royal Arsenal nearby (see Thamesmead) and of the armaments works in the town made Crayford an obvious target for enemy bombers.

The town of Crayford today revolves around the retail trade, and has a large Sainsbury’s hypermarket at its centre. It is home to a substantial commuter population, who travel to London and nearby business and retail centres such as Bexleyheath and the newly opened Bluewater shopping park near Dartford.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Mayplace Road East (1900)
TUM image id: 1574088030
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Martens Avenue, Barnehurst (1934)
Credit: Ideal Homes
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Courtleet Bottom, Erith Road, Barnehurst (1934)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Old Road, Martens Grove, Barnehurst (1934)
Credit: Ideal Homes
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Brook Street, Northumberland Heath. The Duchess of Kent pub is on the right on the corner of Sussex Road.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Barnehurst Road before development was known as Hills and Holes Road. It was renamed to be Barnehurst Road in 1926. Prior to this it was little more than a country lane, but its proximity to the new railway station made it prime land for housing development.
Credit: Bexley Archives
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