Kilburn Grange Park

Park in/near Kilburn, existing between 1913 and now

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Kilburn Grange Park

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Park · Kilburn · NW6 ·
MAY
13
2019

Kilburn Grange Park is a three hectare open space adjacent to Kilburn High Road.

The park takes its name from a large mansion - The Grange - which was built in 1831 and stood facing Kilburn High Road where the Grange Cinema eventually stood.

The Grange, at the end of its time, stood at the centre of the poorest and most crowded part of Kilburn. The streets were the only open space outside the playgrounds of the Council schools.

The first hopes that the space could be made into a public park were raised in 1901 when the owner, Ada Peters, decided that she didn’t want a school built on the edge of her grounds, in Kingsgate Road. She encouraged local residents in the belief that they could purchase the grounds as a park. However, the London School Board had already bought the land in 1892, renting it back to the Peters family until the school was needed.

A local Grange Open Space Committee was formed in April 1901 to resist the ’mutilation’ of the grounds: the short-lived campaign gained popular support before collapsing in June 1901, as Mrs Peters first prevaricated and finally had to admit she couldn’t deliver. The School Board was forced to take her to court in 1902 to obtain possession of the site, and by October the foundations for Kingsgate School were laid.

Ada Peters died soon after and the legally as a result the Peters family regained possession of the Grange and its grounds. For a second time, plans supporting a park were made and meetings called.

A couple of weeks after Mrs Peters’s death, the local paper reported that the nine and a half acre estate was for sale. Agents acting on behalf of the Peters family contacted Hampstead Council to ask if the authority was interested in buying it as an open space, reminding them of the unsuccessful but hugely popular campaign of 1901. Councillors asked for a three month option to buy, giving them time to get an independent valuation of the property. The family refused an option to purchase and had decided the property would be publicly auctioned but by deferring the sale, they hoped this would give the Council ‘nearly the three months required.’

Councillors from both Hampstead and Willesden, the local MP accompanied by representatives of Middlesex County Council and the Metropolitan Gardens Association, outlined their viewpoint: "They desire to point out that unless the present opportunity of acquiring this estate is embraced all chance for providing an open space for Kilburn will disappear."

The Grand lands failed to meet their reserve of £35,000 at the auction held on 24 May 1910, which was mainly attended by developers. The top bid was only £30,000.

The Council re-opened negotiations with the Peters family, offering to buy eight and a half acres of the land plus an access strip from the High Road. The reply was conditional but positive: while the Peters wanted to sell the estate as one lot, they would be willing to sell the ‘park’ land for £18,000 so long as the plots fronting the High Road was sold at the same time and simultaneous contracts exchanged. This was still a considerable amount of money, but working on an anticipated £5000 from the LCC plus £4000 from their own funds and private donations (over £500 already collected), Hampstead Council again approached the agents acting for the Peters.

The family suddenly sold the land to Oswald Stoll, a major name in the entertainment world. He was interested in the Kilburn High Road frontages and had less interest in the land behind.

In October, Stoll’s agents contacted Hampstead Council. They offered five and a half acres of land at an asking price of £12,500. This would lie on either side of a proposed new road, running from the High Road across the estate, to make a junction with Hemstal Road. The Council agreed but only if the price was reduced to £10,000. Stoll’s agents agreed to the Council’s offer but their further condition was for Hampstead to pay half the cost of creating the new road.

Hampstead Council agreed to all Stoll’s terms for purchase and allowed a building licence for his proposed ‘Kilburn Coliseum.’ music hall. Entertainment advances meant that the impressively domed Grange Cinema opened in 1914 on the High Road corner of Messina Avenue, the march of modern technology having overtaken Stoll’s earlier plans for a music hall.

The land decision was taken out of Hampstead’s hands a few months later, when the LCC agreed to purchase around eight and a half acres of the Grange estate for £19,500 and maintain it as a park. Hampstead Council’s contribution was £5500 with Middlesex County Council and Willesden Council each pledging £1000.

Contracts were exchanged on 4 April 1911, and as originally conceived, the park covered seven acres. The LCC earmarked half an acre to enlarge the site of Kingsgate Road school and reserved an acre along Messina Avenue in case it was needed for ‘tramway purposes’, but agreed to add this to the park in 1914. The name ‘Kilburn Gardens’ was proposed for the park by the LCC, but Hampstead’s suggestion that the name of the old house should be perpetuated was adopted, hence it became ‘Kilburn Grange.’ The grounds were opened informally for much of the summer of 1911 while plans for its layout were completed. These included: "An ornamental garden, children’s playground, model yachting pond, band stand, footpaths, drainage, etc., and at a later stage, children’s gymnasium, tennis courts, bowling green, and accommodation for refreshments."

Existing trees were to be kept, and three entrances planned: from Hemstal Road, Messina Avenue and the High Road.

It took a while to complete the landscaping, during which time the grounds were generally closed; in fact nearly two years elapsed before the LCC informed Hampstead Council the park would be opened to the public on 1 May 1913.


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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Cannon Stream The Cannon Stream was, before it was sent underground, a tributary of the Westbourne River.
Decca Studios Decca Studios was a recording facility in Broadhurst Gardens.
Kilburn Grange Park Kilburn Grange Park is a three hectare open space adjacent to Kilburn High Road.
Oaklands Hall On the west side of West End Lane, Charles Spain bought 5 acres and between 1829 and 1838 built York Villa.
The Elms The Elms - also known as Elm Lodge - stood at the junction of Kilburn High Road and Willesden Lane.
The Grange The Grange was a large mansion situated on Kilburn High Road until the turn of the twentieth century.
The Railway The Railway pub is a standard Victorian pub with a musical secret.
West End House West End House, once in open countryside, became surrounded by railways.
West End Park West End Park was created from fields known as the 'Little Estate'.

NEARBY STREETS
Abbots Place, NW6 Abbots Place runs from Priory Road to West End Lane and Abbey Road.
Acol Road, NW6 Acol is not an acronym, but a village in Kent that gave its name to Acol Road, NW6.
Albion Mews, NW6 Albion Mews is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Aldershot Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Ariel Road, NW6 Ariel Road was formed from the 1885 combination of Ariel Street and Spencer Terrace.
Banister Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Bransdale Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Brondesbury Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Brooklands Court, NW6 Brooklands Court is a road in the NW6 postcode area
Buckley Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Burton Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Callcott Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cavendish Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cavendish Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Clarence Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cleve Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cotleigh Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Daynor House, NW6 Residential block
Douglas Court, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Douglas Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Drakes Courtyard, NW6 Drakes Courtyard is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Dunster Gardens, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Dyne Road, NW6 Dyne Road dates from the just after the opening of Kilburn Station in 1879.
Dynham Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Eresby Road, NW6 Eresby Road ran from Kingsgate Road to Kilburn High Road with a turning for Kingsgate Place about halfway down.
Exeter Parade, NW2 Exeter Parade is a street in Cricklewood.
Exeter Road, NW6 Exeter Road is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Gascony Avenue, NW6 Gascony Avenue is an east-west road lying both sides of Kingsgate Road, NW6.
Gladstone Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Gladys Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Grange Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Grangeway, NW6 Grangeway, NW6 lies off of Messina Avenue.
Hemstal Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Highfield Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Hilltop Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Iverson Road, NW6 The first part of Iverson Road, NW6 was laid out in 1872.
Kenilworth Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Kings Gardens, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Kingsgate Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Kingsgate Road, NW6 Kingsgate Road runs between Quex Road and Hemstal Road.
Kingsley Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Kylemore Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Linburn House, NW6 Residential block
Lincoln Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Linstead Street, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Loveridge Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Loveridge Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Lowfield Road, NW6 Lowfield Road is the northern extension of Kingsgate Road, NW6.
Maygrove Road, NW6 Maygrove Road runs between the Edgware Road and Iverson Road, NW6
Mazenod Avenue, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Medley Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Messina Avenue, NW6 Messina Avenue stretches from West End Lane over to Kilburn High Road.
Netherwood Street, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Palmerston Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Plympton Avenue, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Plympton Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Quex Road, NW6 Quex Road is an important road in NW6 linking the Edgware Road and West End Lane.
Rowntree Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Sherriff Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Smyrna Road, NW6 Smyrna Road is a small road to the west of West End Lane.
St Julians Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Streatley Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
The Arches, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
The Terrace, NW6 The Terrace is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Torbay Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Waterloo Passage, NW6 Waterloo Passage is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Wavel Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Webheath, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
West End Lane, NW6 West End Lane is the main road running through West Hampstead.
West Hampstead Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Willesden Court, S43 This is a street in the S43 postcode area
Woodchurch Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6


Kilburn

Kilburn is an area which straddles both sides of the Edgware Road (Kilburn High Road).

Kilburn High Road originated as an ancient trackway, part of a Celtic route between the settlements now known as Canterbury and St Albans. Under Roman rule, the route was paved. In Anglo-Saxon times the road became known as Watling Street.

Kilburn grew up on the banks of a stream which has been known variously as Cuneburna, Kelebourne and Cyebourne, which flows from Hampstead down through Hyde Park and into the River Thames. It is suggested the name means either Royal River or Cattle River ('Bourne' being an Anglo-Saxon word for 'river'). That river is known today as the Westbourne.

The name Kilburn was first recorded in 1134 as Cuneburna, referring to the priory which had been built on the site of the cell of a hermit known as Godwyn. Godwyn had built his hermitage by the Kilburn river during the reign of Henry I, and both his hermitage and the priory took their name from the river.

Kilburn Priory was a small community of nuns, probably Augustinian canonesses. It was founded in 1134 at the Kilburn river crossing on Watling Street (the modern-day junction of Kilburn High Road and Belsize Road). Kilburn Priory's position on Watling Street meant that it became a popular resting point for pilgrims heading for the shrines at St Albans and Willesden. The Priory was dissolved in 1536-37 by Henry VIII, and nothing remains of it today. The priory lands included a mansion and a hostium (a guesthouse), which may have been the origin of the Red Lion pub, thought to have been founded in 1444. Opposite, the Bell Inn was opened around 1600, on the site of the old mansion.

The fashion for taking 'medicinal waters' in the 18th century came to Kilburn when a well of chalybeate waters (water impregnated with iron) was discovered near the Bell Inn in 1714. In an attempt to compete with the nearby Hampstead Well, gardens and a 'great room' were opened to promote the well, and its waters were promoted in journals of the day as cure for 'stomach ailments'.

In the 19th century the wells declined, but the Kilburn Wells remained popular as a tea garden. The Bell was demolished and rebuilt in 1863. The Kilburn stretch of Watling Street, now called Edgware Road and Kilburn High Road, was gradually built up with inns and farm houses. Kilburn did not attract any significant building until around 1819 in the area near St John's Wood.

Much of the area was developed in the last decades of the 19th century by Solomon Barnett, who named many of the streets after places in the West Country (e.g. Torbay) or after popular poets of the day (e.g. Tennyson) in honour of his wife.

There are three railway stations on Kilburn High Road: Kilburn tube station (Jubilee line) at its northern end and a little to the south Brondesbury station (London Overground). Approximately a mile further south is Kilburn High Road station (also London Overground). The name of Ian Dury's first band, Kilburn and the High Roads, refers to this road, as does the Flogging Molly song, "Kilburn High Road" and the Shack song, "Kilburn High Road".

Kilburn tube station opened as Kilburn and Brondesbury on 24 November 1879, as part of the Metropolitan and St. John's Wood Railway run by the Metropolitan Railway. Following the merger of the Metropolitan Railway into London Transport in 1933, it then became part of the Stanmore branch of the Bakerloo line on 20 November 1939, at which time the station was extensively rebuilt. The station was renamed to its current name on 25 September 1950. It was transferred to the Jubilee line on its opening, on 1 May 1979.


LOCAL PHOTOS
West Hampstead Overgound
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West End Park, 1870s
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The Beatles at Decca
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The Railway, West Hampstead
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Billy Fury Way
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Grangeway, NW6
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201402160103
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Extract from the London Gazette
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