Barnehurst Avenue, DA7

Road in/near Crayford, existing between the 1930s and now

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Road · Crayford · DA7 ·
MAY
31
2019

Barnehurst Avenue runs north from Merewood Road up to the Erith Road.

By 1932 development had started on the ’Mayplace Estate’ which was built by developers W.H. Wedlock Ltd. on fairly difficult terrain for building. The estate was laid out between Erith Road and Barnehurst Avenue and roads took names associated with the Lake District.

A new pub called ’The Red Barn’ was built in 1936 by Arnolds of Chelmsford.

To the east of Barnehurst Avenue, New Ideal Homesteads Ltd began their ’Barnehurst Park Estate’.


Main source: Ideal Homes
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Andrew MacFarlane   
Added: 25 Nov 2020 11:22 GMT   

my time at Mayplace road school
started at mayplace in 1938 the teachers were Mr English headmaster Miss Clark,Bress,and miss Black
I lived 200 yards from the school

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

Reply
Comment
Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

Reply

Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

Reply
Comment
ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

Reply
Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


Reply
Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

Reply
Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

Reply
Comment
Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

Reply

NEARBY STREETS
Alberta Road, DA8 Alberta Road is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Appledore Avenue, DA7 Appledore Avenue was built as part of the ’Barnehurst Park Estate’ of New Ideal Homesteads Ltd.
Appleton Close, DA7 A street within the DA7 postcode
Barnehurst Avenue, DA8 Barnehurst Avenue is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Barnehurst Close, DA8 Barnehurst Close is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Beechcroft Avenue, DA7 Beechcroft Avenue is one of a series of north-south roads named alphabetically.
Beverley Road, DA7 Beverley Road is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Castleton Avenue, DA7 Castleton Avenue is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Colyers Lane Primary School, DA7 Colyers Lane Primary School is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Coniston Close, DA7 Coniston Close is a small cul-de-sac lying off of Coniston Road.
Coniston Road, DA7 Coniston Road was laid out by the W H Wedlock company in 1932.
Courtleet Drive, DA8 Courtleet Drive is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Doris Avenue, DA8 A street within the DA8 postcode
Downbank Avenue, DA7 Downbank Avenue is a road in the DA7 postcode area
East Holme, DA8 East Holme is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Edendale Road, DA7 Edendale Road is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Edendale Road, DA7 Edendale Road is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Erith Road, DA8 Erith Road is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Fairford Avenue, DA7 Fairford Avenue is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Grasmere Road, DA7 Grasmere Road runs from Erith Road to Merewood Road.
Heath Way, DA8 Heath Way is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Heathway, DA8 Heathway is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Hilary Close, DA7 Hilary Close is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Homer Close, DA7 Homer Close is a road lying off of Grasmere Road.
Hornbeam Lane, DA7 Hornbeam Lane provides access to the car park of Barnehurst station.
Lingwood, DA7 Lingwood is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Merewood Road, DA7 Merewood Road runs east from Erith Road.
Northall Road, DA7 Northall Road is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Northumberland Way, DA7 Northumberland Way is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Old Manor Way, DA7 Old Manor Way is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Parkside Cross, DA7 A street within the DA7 postcode
Peartree Close, DA7 A street within the DA8 postcode
Taunton Close, DA7 Taunton Close is a road in the DA7 postcode area
Thirlmere Road, DA7 Thirlmere Road runs between Coniston Road and Grasmere Road.
Three Corners, DA7 Three Corners is a road in the DA7 postcode area
west Holme, DA8 west Holme is a road in the DA8 postcode area
Windermere Road, DA7 Windermere Road is named for the largest lake in England.

NEARBY PUBS
The Red Barn This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Crayford

Crayford was combined with other local areas to form the London Borough of Bexley in 1965.


Crayford has a long and interesting history. The area was first mentioned in the Anglo Saxon Chronicle (c.891 - 924), which states that the Britons fought the Jutes at the Battle of Creganford in 457. The Domesday Book (1086) records that in Crayford "there is a church", implying that there was a well established settlement in the area by that time. The Norman Church of St Paulinus, which still stands on top of Crayford Hill overlooking the town, was built in 1100.

The original stimulus for settlement in the area was the fact that the River Cray could be forded at this point - and "Cray-ford" became the settlement’s name.

Crayford Manor House stands just to the north-west of St Paulinus Church, probably in roughly the same position as the first manor house, which was established in the 14th century. Crayford actually contained two manors, those of Howbury and Newbury.

Several large houses once stood in the area, including Oakwood, Shenstone and May Place. Little evidence remains of these, although part of the last house called May Place is now incorporated into the clubhouse of Barnehurst Golf Course.

The house was for many years the seat of the lord of the manor and between 1694 and 1707 was the home of Sir Cloudesley Shovell (1650 - 1707), Commander in Chief of the Navy who took part in the capture of Gibraltar in 1704 during the War of the Spanish Succession. Three years later, after his ship the Association was wrecked off the Isles of Scilly, he was strangled for the rings he wore, by a fisherwoman.

The presence of the river in the town led to the growth of industries such as tanning and silk-making, which need a constant supply of free-flowing fresh water. The tannery has long since gone, but the silk-printing works of David Evans Ltd, established in 1843, remain in the town. Swaislands was another long-established local printing firm. It was taken over by GP & J Baker who closed the works only in 1961.

In the early years of the 19th century the huge armaments firm Vickers, originally from Sheffield, moved into the area. In the few short years of the First World War Vickers’ workforce grew from 300 to 14,000. Vickers built an estate, the Crayford Garden Suburb, to the east of the town to house the armaments workers. Whilst all that remains of the Vickers factory today is the clocktower, surrounded by modern retail development, the houses are still very much in evidence and are sought after as homes because of the quality of construction. This area, which borders on Dartford and the County of Kent, became known as Barnes Cray after a prominent local family (the Barnes).

Other industries in the area included barge building in Crayford Creek, brickmaking and motor-car production by the Siddeley Autocar Company, which had its registered works at Crayford in 1902.

After the First World War the production of armaments was reduced, but industry continued to thrive and the local community prospered on the trade brought to the area as a result of the influx of workers during the war. The Princesses Theatre, opened in 1916 on the riverside, was built specifically to entertain these workers but unfortunately burnt to the ground within six months. It was subsequently rebuilt to exactly the same specifications but presumably with improved fire-protection measures!

In 1920 Crayford became an urban district. As in most other local areas, the 1930s saw a period of busy housebuilding, although this was perhaps not as extensive in Crayford as it was elsewhere. Houses were built mostly by local builders such as New Ideal Homesteads and W.H. Wedlock.

The population in the urban district almost doubled in the 20 years to 1951, from 15,896 in 1931 to 27,950 in 1951.

Housebuilding was interrupted by the Second World War, which affected Crayford badly because the presence of the Royal Arsenal nearby (see Thamesmead) and of the armaments works in the town made Crayford an obvious target for enemy bombers.

The town of Crayford today revolves around the retail trade, and has a large Sainsbury’s hypermarket at its centre. It is home to a substantial commuter population, who travel to London and nearby business and retail centres such as Bexleyheath and the newly opened Bluewater shopping park near Dartford.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Mayplace Road East (1900)
TUM image id: 1574088030
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Martens Avenue, Barnehurst (1934)
Credit: Ideal Homes
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Courtleet Bottom, Erith Road, Barnehurst (1934)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Old Road, Martens Grove, Barnehurst (1934)
Credit: Ideal Homes
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Mayplace Road East (1900)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Barnehurst Road before development was known as Hills and Holes Road. It was renamed to be Barnehurst Road in 1926. Prior to this it was little more than a country lane, but its proximity to the new railway station made it prime land for housing development.
Credit: Bexley Archives
Licence:


Midfield Parade, Barnehurt (1940s) With the growth of Barnehurst in the 1930s - commuter housing, new roads and new schools - this junction became south Barnehurst’s main shopping centre, built by Ellinghams who also developed much of Bexleyheath. The first shops were named ‘The Parade’ and provided a dozen retail units with living accommodation above.
Credit: Bexley Archives
Licence:


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