Lots Road Power Station

Power station in/near Imperial Wharf, existed between 1904 and 2002

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Power station · Imperial Wharf · SW10 ·
December
5
2011

Lots Road Power Station was a coal (and later oil-fired then gas-fired) power station, which supplied electricity to the London Underground system.

A power station at Lots Road was originally planned by the Brompton and Piccadilly Circus Railway (B&PCR, now part of the Piccadilly line) in 1897. The B&PCR was controlled by the District Railway (DR, now the District line) from 1898, and was sold in 1901 to Charles Yerkes’ Metropolitan District Electric Traction Company, which built the station to provide power to the DR. The station allowed the District line trains to change from steam haulage to electric. At around the same time the Metropolitan Railway built its power station at Neasden.

The station was built end-on to the Thames, on the north bank of the tidal Chelsea Creek. Construction started in 1902 and was completed in December 1904, the station becoming operational in February 1905. The station burned 700 tonnes of coal a day and had a generating capacity of 50,000 kW. At the time it was claimed to be the largest power station ever built, and it eventually powered most of the railways and tramways in the Underground Group.

The station was re-equipped and improved several times. During the early 1920s a sump & hopper system for more efficient fuel handling was installed. A modernisation undertaken in the 1960s converted the station to 50 Hz generation and from coal burning to heavy fuel oil. The number of chimneys was reduced from the original four to two. Between 1974 and 1977, with the discovery of natural gas in the North Sea, the boilers were converted to burn gas, with the option of oil firing if required. The station later worked in conjunction with the ex-London County Council Tramways power station at Greenwich to supply the London Underground network.

The station played a part in the birth of commercial radio in the UK. When the first two radio stations, LBC and Capital Radio, opened in October 1973, the site for their medium wave transmitters was not complete. As a result, a temporary ’Tee’ antenna was strung up between the two chimneys (transmitting LBC on 417 m (719 kHz), and Capital Radio on 539 m (557 kHz)), until the permanent site at Saffron Green was ready in 1975. Some years later the site was used again, on 720 kHz (for a low power MW relay of BBC Radio 4’s LW service) which was in use until 2001 when the radio transmitter was moved to Crystal Palace.

In the 1990s, it was decided not to re-equip Lots Road again; rather it was to continue to operate only until the machinery’s life was expired.

It was finally shut down on 21 October 2002, and since then all power for the tube system has been supplied from the National Grid.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963’65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

Reply
Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Watts   
Added: 17 May 2022 20:29 GMT   

Baeethoven St School, also an Annex for Paddington College of FE.
In the early 70’s I took a two year science course at Paddington CFE. The science classes were held on weekday evenings at Beethoven Street school, overseen by chemistry teacher, Mr Tattershall.

Reply

   
Added: 25 Apr 2022 22:11 GMT   

Southover, N12
Everyone knows Central Woodside is the place to be. Ever since kdog moved from finchtown, Woodside has been thriving.

Reply
Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

Reply

Brian Lynch   
Added: 10 Apr 2022 13:38 GMT   

Staples Mattress Factory
An architect’s design of the Staples Mattress Factory
An image found on the website of Dalzell’s Beds, in Armagh Northern Ireland.

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 19 Feb 2022 16:21 GMT   

Harmondsworth (1939 - 1965)
I lived in a house (Lostwithiel) on the Bath Road opposite the junction with Tythe Barn Lane, now a hotel site. Initially, aircraft used one of the diagonal runways directly in line with our house. I attended Sipson Primary School opposite the Three Magpies and celebrated my 21st birthday at The Peggy Bedford in 1959.

Reply

Emma Seif   
Added: 25 Jan 2022 19:06 GMT   

Birth of the Bluestocking Society
In about 1750, Elizabeth Montagu began hosting literary breakfasts in her home at 23 (now 31) Hill Street. These are considered the first meetings of the Bluestocking society.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 14 Jan 2022 03:06 GMT   

Goldbourne Gardens W 10
I lived in Goldbourne Gardens in the 50,s very happy big bomb site

Reply

Chris Nash   
Added: 10 Jan 2022 22:54 GMT   

Shortlands Close, DA17
Shortlands Close and the flats along it were constructed in the mid-1990s. Prior to this, the area was occupied by semi-detached houses with large gardens, which dated from the post-war period and were built on the site of Railway Farm. The farm and its buildings spanned the length of Abbey Road, on the south side of the North Kent Line railway tracks.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Chelsea Farm Chelsea Farm was established on the northern banks of the Thames on land previously open to common pasturage after the annual harvest.
Cremorne Gardens Cremorne Gardens, with a vestige existing today, was in its prime between 1846 and 1877.
Lots Road Power Station Lots Road Power Station was a coal (and later oil-fired then gas-fired) power station, which supplied electricity to the London Underground system.
Sands End Sands End was a close knit working class community.

NEARBY STREETS
Althorpe Mews, SW11 Althorpe Mews is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Ashburnham Road, SW10 Ashburnham Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Bagleys Lane, SW6 Bagleys Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
Battersea Church Road, SW11 Battersea Church Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Battersea Square, SW11 Battersea Square is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Blantyre Street, SW10 Blantyre Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Bridges Place, SW6 Bridges Place is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
Burnaby Street, SW10 Burnaby Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Cambria Street, SW6 Cambria Street is a road in the SW6 postcode area
Chelsea Harbour Drive, SW10 Chelsea Harbour Drive is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Chelsea Reach, SW10 Chelsea Reach is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Chelsea Studios, SW10 Chelsea Studios is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Chelsea Wharf, SW10 Chelsea Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Cooper House, SW6 Residential block
Cotswold Mews, SW11 Cotswold Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Cremorne Road, SW10 Cremorne Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Damer Terrace, SW10 Damer Terrace is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Dartrey Tower, SW10 Dartrey Tower is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Design Centre, SW10 Chelsea Harbour Design Centre lies on Harbour Avenue.
Eaton House, SW11 Eaton House is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Edith Row, SW6 Edith Row is a location in London.
Fulmead Street, SW6 Fulmead Street is a road in the SW6 postcode area
Granfield Street, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Greaves Tower, SW10 Greaves Tower is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Gwyn Close, SW6 Gwyn Close is a road in the SW6 postcode area
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Harbour Yard, SW10 Harbour Yard is a block in Imperial Wharf.
Holmead Road, SW6 Holmead Road is a road in the SW6 postcode area
Imperial Road, SW6 Imperial Road is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
Imperial Square, SW6 Imperial Square is a road in the SW6 postcode area
King’s Road, SW6 This is a street in the SW6 postcode area
Kings Road, SW6 Kings Road is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
King’s Road, SW6 King’s Road is a road in the SW6 postcode area
Lockgate Road, SW6 Lockgate Road is a location in London.
Lots Road, SW10 Lots Road, older than the surrounding streets, was once Pooles Lane which was a track leading to Chelsea Farm.
Maltings Place, SW6 Maltings Place is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
Maynard Close, SW6 Maynard Close is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
Michael Road, SW6 Michael Road is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
Micheal Road, SW6 Micheal Road is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
Pearscroft Court, SW6 Pearscroft Court is a road in the SW6 postcode area
Raasay Street, SW10 Raasay Street ran from Dartrey Road to Edith Grove.
Rumbold Road, SW6 Rumbold Road is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
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Stadium Street, SW10 Stadium Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Sunbury Lane, SW11 Sunbury Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Tadema Road, SW10 Tadema Road was named after Lawrence Alma-Tadema
Tetcott Road, SW10 Tetcott Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Thames Avenue, SW10 Thames Avenue is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Thames Towpath, SW10 Thames Towpath is a road in the SW10 postcode area
The Chambers, SW10 The Chambers is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
The Crainewell, SW6 The Crainewell is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
The Plaza, SW10 The Plaza is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
The Quad, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
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Upcerne Road, SW10 Upcerne Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Upper Whistler Walk, SW10 This is a street in the SW10 postcode area
Uverdale Road, SW10 Uverdale Road runs north from Lots Road.
Valiant House, SW11 Residential block
Vicarage Crescent, SW11 Vicarage Crescent is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Vicarage Walk, SW11 Vicarage Walk is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Wandon Road, SW6 Wandon Road is a road in the SW6 postcode area
Wardens Square, SW6 Wardens Square is one of the streets of London in the SW6 postal area.
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Worlds End Place, SW10 Worlds End Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Butchers Hook This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Chelsea Pensioner This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Chelsea Ram This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hilton Doubletree This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lots Road Pub & Dining room This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Mare Moto This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Queen Elizabeth This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Imperial This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Jam Tree This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Zefi Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Imperial Wharf

Imperial Wharf is a London Overground station in Fulham, near to the boundary with Chelsea in west London on the West London Line.

The station is located in Sands End where the line crosses Townmead Road. It takes its name from the adjacent redevelopment of a brownfield, former industrial, site, which has been developed into a luxury 1,800 apartment river-side complex by property developers St George.

As the Imperial Wharf development continued to grow, so did the business case for the Imperial Wharf station.

The station is also adjacent to Chelsea Harbour, and was known by this name during early stages of development.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Click here to see map view of nearby Creative Commons images
Click here to see Creative Commons images near to this postcode
The Dancing Platform at Cremorne Gardens (1864) In the 17th century, Chelsea Farm was formed and the area was used for market gardening plots, supplying central London. In 1778, Lord Cremorne bought Chelsea Farm and Cremorne House was built. In 1830 Charles Random de Berenger, a colourful character implicated in financial fraud during the Napoleonic War, purchased Cremorne House. He was a keen sportsman and opened a sports club know as Cremorne Stadium for ‘skilful and manly exercise’ including shooting, sailing, archery and fencing. In 1846, De Berenger’s Cremorne Stadium was transformed into a pleasure garden which became a popular and noisy place of entertainment. The entertainment included a diverse range of activities including concerts, fireworks, balloon ascents, galas and theatre.
Credit: Phoebus Levin
TUM image id: 1526047056
Licence:
Elm Park Gardens
TUM image id: 1573064988
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Badric Road, SW11 (1950s)
TUM image id: 1647278035
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
The Dancing Platform at Cremorne Gardens (1864) In the 17th century, Chelsea Farm was formed and the area was used for market gardening plots, supplying central London. In 1778, Lord Cremorne bought Chelsea Farm and Cremorne House was built. In 1830 Charles Random de Berenger, a colourful character implicated in financial fraud during the Napoleonic War, purchased Cremorne House. He was a keen sportsman and opened a sports club know as Cremorne Stadium for ‘skilful and manly exercise’ including shooting, sailing, archery and fencing. In 1846, De Berenger’s Cremorne Stadium was transformed into a pleasure garden which became a popular and noisy place of entertainment. The entertainment included a diverse range of activities including concerts, fireworks, balloon ascents, galas and theatre.
Credit: Phoebus Levin
Licence:


Badric Road, SW11 (1950s)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Boys and girls kick a ball around a quiet Uverdale Road, Chelsea (early 1960s). The road is now filled with parked cars and a gated playground. Just down the road from major bomb sites, this was one of a cluster of streets that became a ghost town in the wake of the Blitz
Credit: John Bignell
Licence:


Chelsea Farm in the days of Countess Huntindon
Credit: Kensington and Chelsea Libraries
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Graffiti, Raasay Street, Chelsea (1969).
Credit: Roger Perry
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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