Sapphire Banqueting

Pub/bar in/near Wembley Stadium

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Pub/bar · Wembley Stadium · HA9 ·
JUNE
12
2018

This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.

If you know the current status of this business, please comment.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

None so far :(
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
danny currie   
Added: 30 Nov 2022 18:39 GMT   

dads yard
ron currie had a car breaking yard in millers yard back in the 60s good old days

Reply

Lynette beardwood   
Added: 29 Nov 2022 20:53 GMT   

Spy’s Club
Topham’s Hotel at 24-28 Ebury Street was called the Ebury Court Hotel. Its first proprietor was a Mrs Topham. In WW2 it was a favourite watering hole for the various intelligence organisations based in the Pimlico area. The first woman infiltrated into France in 1942, FANY Yvonne Rudellat, was recruited by the Special Operations Executive while working there. She died in Bergen Belsen in April 1945.

Reply
Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:39 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

Reply
Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:38 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

Reply
Lived here
Phil Stubbington   
Added: 14 Nov 2022 16:28 GMT   

Numbers 60 to 70 (1901 - 1939)
A builder, Robert Maeers (1842-1919), applied to build six houses on plots 134 to 139 on the Lincoln House Estate on 5 October 1901. He received approval on 8 October 1901. These would become numbers 60 to 70 Rodenhurst Road (60 is plot 139). Robert Maeers was born in Northleigh, Devon. In 1901 he was living in 118 Elms Road with his wife Georgina, nee Bagwell. They had four children, Allan, Edwin, Alice, and Harriet, born between 1863 and 1873.
Alice Maeers was married to John Rawlins. Harriet Maeers was married to William Street.
Three of the six houses first appear on the electoral register in 1904:
Daniel Mescal “Ferncroft”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By the 1905 electoral register all six are occupied:

Daniel Mescal “St Senans”
Henry Robert Honeywood “Grasmere”
John Rawlins “Iveydene”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Walter Ernest Manning “St Hilda”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By 1906 house numbers replace names:

Daniel Mescal 70
Henry Robert Honeywood 68
John Rawlins 66
William Francis Street 64
Walter Ernest Manning 62
Henry Elkin 60

It’s not clear whether number 70 changed from “Ferncroft” to “St Senans” or possibly Daniel Mescal moved houses.

In any event, it can be seen that Robert Maeers’ two daughters are living in numbers 64 and 66, with, according to local information, an interconnecting door. In the 1911 census William Street is shown as a banker’s clerk. John Rawlins is a chartering clerk in shipping. Robert Maeers and his wife are also living at this address, Robert being shown as a retired builder.

By 1939 all the houses are in different ownership except number 60, where the Elkins are still in residence.


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Comment
stephen garraway   
Added: 13 Nov 2022 13:56 GMT   

Martin Street, Latimer Road
I was born at St Charlottes and lived at 14, Martin Street, Latimer Road W10 until I was 4 years old when we moved to the east end. It was my Nan Grant’s House and she was the widow of George Frederick Grant. She had two sons, George and Frederick, and one daughter, my mother Margaret Patricia.
The downstairs flat where we lived had two floors, the basement and the ground floor. The upper two floors were rented to a Scot and his family, the Smiths. He had red hair. The lights and cooker were gas and there was one cold tap over a Belfast sink. A tin bath hung on the wall. The toilet was outside in the yard. This was concreted over and faced the the rear of the opposite terraces. All the yards were segregated by high brick walls. The basement had the a "best" room with a large , dark fireplace with two painted metal Alsation ornaments and it was very dark, cold and little used.
The street lights were gas and a man came round twice daily to turn them on and off using a large pole with a hook and a lighted torch on the end. I remember men coming round the streets with carts selling hot chestnuts and muffins and also the hurdy gurdy man with his instrument and a monkey in a red jacket. I also remember the first time I saw a black man and my mother pulling me away from him. He had a Trilby and pale Mackintosh so he must of been one of the first of the Windrush people. I seem to recall he had a thin moustache.
Uncle George had a small delivery lorry but mum lost touch with him and his family. Uncle Fred went to Peabody Buildings near ST.Pauls.
My Nan was moved to a maisonette in White City around 1966, and couldn’t cope with electric lights, cookers and heating and she lost all of her neighbourhood friends. Within six months she had extreme dementia and died in a horrible ward in Tooting Bec hospital a year or so later. An awful way to end her life, being moved out of her lifelong neighbourhood even though it was slums.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 31 Oct 2022 18:47 GMT   

Memories
I lived at 7 Conder Street in a prefab from roughly 1965 to 1971 approx - happy memories- sad to see it is no more ?

Reply

Eve Glover   
Added: 22 Oct 2022 09:28 GMT   

Shenley Road
Shenley Road is the main street in Borehamwood where the Job Centre and Blue Arrow were located

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Oakington Manor Farm Oakington Manor Farm derived its name from a corruption of the name ’Tokyngton’.
Wembley Stadium (1947) Wembley Stadium and its twin towers

NEARBY STREETS
Arena Square, HA9 Arena Square is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Carey Way, HA9 Carey Way is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Chippenham Avenue, HA9 Chippenham Avenue is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Engineers Way, HA9 Engineers Way is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Fifth Way, HA9 Fifth Way is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
First Way, HA9 First Way is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Fourth Way, HA9 Fourth Way is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Grand Avenue, HA9 Grand Avenue is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Great Central Way, HA9 Great Central Way is a location in London.
Grove Way, HA9 Grove Way is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Hallmark Trading Centre, HA9 Hallmark Trading Centre is on Fourth Way.
Neeld Court, HA9 Neeld Court is a block on Neeld Crescent
Neeld Crescent, HA9 Neeld Crescent is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Neeld Parade, HA9 Neeld Parade is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Oakington Manor Drive, HA9 Oakington Manor Drive is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Park View, HA9 Park View is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Popin Business Centre, HA9 Popin Business Centre is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Rubicon House, HA9 Rubicon House is a location in London.
Second Way, HA9 Second Way is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
South Way, HA9 South Way is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
St Michael’s Avenue, HA9 St Michael’s Avenue leads from the Harrow Road to Sherrins Farm Open Space.
Stadium Retail Park, HA9 Stadium Retail Park is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Third Way, HA9 Third Way is one of the streets in the Harrow postal district of Middlesex.
Towers Business Park, HA9 A street within the HA9 postcode
Tudor Court North, HA9 Tudor Court North is a road in the HA9 postcode area
Tudor Court South, HA9 Tudor Court South is a road in the HA9 postcode area

NEARBY PUBS


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 524 completed street histories and 46976 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


Wembley Stadium



Wembley Stadium is a football stadium in Wembley, London, England. With 90,000 seats the stadium has the second largest capacity in Europe. By area it is the largest roof-covered football stadium in the world, and stands opposite Wembley Arena. It is often refered to as "New Wembley" to distinguish it from the original stadium at the same site (...)


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Wembley Stadium, 1947
TUM image id: 1556882897
Licence:
Oakington Manor Farm
TUM image id: 1603469997
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Wembley Stadium, 1947
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Oakington Manor Farm
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Alliott Verdon Roe in his Triplane, Wembley Park (1909)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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