Welsh Harp (Brent Reservoir)

Reservoir in/near Dollis Hill, existing between 1835 and now

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  ·  MAPS  ·  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.569 -0.248, 51.569 -0.248) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Reservoir · * · NW2 ·
July
29
2018

The Brent Reservoir (popularly called the Welsh Harp) is a reservoir between Hendon and Wembley Park.

It lies on the boundary between the boroughs of Brent and Barnet. The reservoir takes its informal name from a public house called The Welsh Harp, which stood nearby until the early 1970s.

By 1820 there was not enough water to supply the Grand Union Canal and the Regent’s Canal so having obtained an enabling act of Parliament in 1819, the Regent’s Canal Company decided to dam the River Brent to create a reservoir and cut a feeder channel from it to an upper point on the Grand Union Canal. The reservoir is fed by the Silk Stream and the River Brent. Its main outflow is the River Brent.

The reservoir was constructed by contractor William Hoof between 1834 and 1835. The water flooded much of Cockman’s Farm, to supply the Regent’s Canal at Paddington. Its owner gave it the name of its then-parish it was named Kingsbury Reservoir.

Additional building was completed in December 1837 to extend the reservoir. In 1841 after seven days of continuous rain the dam head collapsed, killing two people. It was after this that a supervisor was employed for the first time, with a cottage near the dam, which remains.

At its greatest extent it covered 400 acres in 1853. It was reduced to 195 acres in the 1890s; later to 110 acres. It is still said to contain enough water to fill three million baths, and in 1994 when the reservoir was drained, more than 6,700 lb of fish were captured, 95% of which were Roach. Fishing is now prohibited.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

Click here to go to a random London street
We now have 412 completed street histories and 47088 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Martina   
Added: 13 Jul 2017 21:22 GMT   

Schweppes factory
The site is now a car shop and Angels Fancy Dress shop and various bread factories are there.

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 08:59 GMT   

Spigurnell Road, N17
I was born and lived in Spigurnell Road no 32 from 1951.My father George lived in Spigurnell Road from 1930’s.When he died in’76 we moved to number 3 until I got married in 1982 and moved to Edmonton.Spigurnell Road was a great place to live.Number 32 was 2 up 2 down toilet out the back council house in those days

Reply
Comment
Lewis   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 20:48 GMT   

Ploy
Allotment

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

Reply
Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Welsh Harp (Brent Reservoir) The Brent Reservoir (popularly called the Welsh Harp) is a reservoir between Hendon and Wembley Park.

NEARBY STREETS
Dawpool Road, NW2 Dawpool Road is a street in Cricklewood.
Field Close, NW2 Field Close is a location in London.
Glenwood Avenue, NW9 Glenwood Avenue is a street in Kingsbury.
Harp Business Centre, NW2 Harp Business Centre is a street in Cricklewood.
Heather Road, NW2 Heather Road is a road in the NW2 postcode area
Links Road, NW2 Links Road is a street in Cricklewood.
Parkfields Avenue, NW9 Parkfields Avenue is a road in the NW9 postcode area
Review Road, NW2 Review Road is a street in Cricklewood.
Selsdon Road, NW2 Selsdon Road is a street in Cricklewood.
Shepherds Walk, NW2 Shepherds Walk is a road in the NW2 postcode area


Dollis Hill

Dollis Hill tube station lies on the Jubilee Line, between Willesden Green and Neasden. Metropolitan Line trains pass though the station, but do not stop.

The Dollis Hill Estate was formed in the early 19th century, when the Finch family bought up a number of farms in the area to form a single estate. Dollis Hill House itself was built in the 1820s.

William Ewart Gladstone, the UK Prime Minister, was a frequent visitor to Dollis Hill House in the late 19th century. The year after his death, 1899, Willesden Council acquired much of the Dollis Hill Estate for use as a public park, which was named Gladstone Park.

Mark Twain stayed in Dollis Hill House in the summer of 1900. He wrote that ’Dollis Hill comes nearer to being a paradise than any other home I ever occupied’.

With the advent of a station at Dollis Hill in 1909, the area began to urbanise. It became a suburban area favoured by Jewish Londoners moving out of the East End - its synagogue opened in 1938.

The code-breaking Colossus computer, used at Bletchley Park during the Second World War, was built at the Post Office Research Station in Dollis Hill by a team lead by Tommy Flowers. The station was relocated to Martlesham Heath at the end of the 1970s. A World War II bunker for Winston Churchill called Paddock is also located in the area.

The fictional Dollis Hill Football Club features occasionally in the British satirical magazine Private Eye, and Dollis Hill tube station, although real, is frequently played in the radio panel game Mornington Crescent.


LOCAL PHOTOS
West Hendon from above
TUM image id: 1489498601
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Burnley Road c. 1910
TUM image id: 1516553935
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Chapter Road, Willesden Green
TUM image id: 1591890062
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Normanby Road in Edwardian times.
TUM image id: 1548713693
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Dollis Hall Farm
Credit: Brent Museum
TUM image id: 1516546073
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Plough - reputedly 800 years old
TUM image id: 1517936032
Licence: CC BY 2.0

Print-friendly version of this page