Colegravenue Road, E15

Road in/near Stratford

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(51.55124 -0.00156, 51.551 -0.001) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · Stratford · E15 ·
APRIL
2
2019

A street within the E15 postcode

0
A lot of the street information research on this website is academic in nature - from university research, the Survey of London, British History Online, borough conservation areas and more. Occasionally, the Hive Mind comes up trumps - these derivations come from discoveries on the Wikipedia made during 2019 which is feeding into the project.

If we find any derivations dubious here, we remove them. With that proviso, the TUM project provides them here for your enjoyment...

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Jack Cornwell Street Newham Jack Cornwell First World War sailor boy and recipient of the Victoria Cross, who grew up here: Little Ilford, East Ham.
Jacob’s Well Mews – after Jacob Hinde, husband of Anne Thayer, who inherited this land from her father Thomas Thayer [Marylebone]
James Street – named after Prince James, later James II, son of Charles I who was reigning king when this street was built in the 1630s [Covent Garden]
Jermyn Street Westminster Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans Developed much of St. James's around the year 1667
Jerusalem Passage – after the Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem [Clerkenwell]
Jewry Street – after the former Jewish community which was based here; formerly Poor Jewry Street [City of London]
Jockey’s Fields – thoguht to date from the old custom of the Lord Mayor and retainers on horseback inspecting the nearby conduit on the river Tyburn [Holborn]
Johanna Street – possibly after local resident and subscriber to the Old Vic Johanna Serres [Waterloo]
John Adam Street – after John Adam, who built the Adelphi development with his brother Robert in the 1760s [Strand]
John Archer Way Wandsworth John Archer First black mayor of a London council - Battersea Borough Council, in 1913/4
John Bradshaw Road Enfield John Bradshaw Benefactor of Southgate, who lived nearby in The Bourne
John Carpenter Street City of London John Carpenter Town clerk of the City of London in the fifteenth century, and founder of the City of London School
John Islip Street Westminster John Islip Abbot of the monastery of Westminster at the time of Henry VIII
John Milton Passage – after the author John Milton [City of London]
John Prince's Street – after John Prince, surveyor to the Cavendish-Harley estate in the 1710s [Marylebone]
John Street – after local 18th century carpenter John Blagrave [Bloomsbury]
John Trundle Highwalk – after John Trundle, 16th–17th century author and book seller [City of London]
John Wesley Highwalk – after John Wesley, founder of Methodism [City of London]
John Wilson Street Greenwich John Wilson Minister of Woolwich Baptist Tabernacle, now Woolwich Central Baptist Church, who gave generously to the local poor
John’s Mews – after local 18th century carpenter John Blagrave [Bloomsbury]
Johnson’s Place – after John Johnson, Victorian-era local paviour/owner [Victoria]
Johnsons Court – after a local 16th century property owning family of this name; the connection with Samuel Johnson is coincidental [City of London]
Jonathan Street – for Jonathan Tyers and his son, owner/managers of the nearby Vauxhall Gardens for much of the 18th century [Vauxhall]
Jones Street – after William Jones, yeoman, who leased a large plot here in 1723 [Mayfair]
Jubilee Walkway – named in 1977 to commemorate the Silver Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II [Southwark]
Judd Street WC1 - Takes its name from Sir Andrew Judd, Lord Mayor, 1551-2, erected one notable free schoole at Tonbridge in Kent he was a land owner of St Pancras. Thus Kentish names like Tonbridge Street in the area. Judd developed the local area via the Skinners’ Company in the 1570s [Bloomsbury]
Juxon Street – after William Juxon, Archbishop of Canterbury 1660-63, by connection with the nearby Lambeth Palace [Lambeth]
Kean Street – after Edmund Kean, successful Shakespearian actor of the 19th century, and his actor son Charles Kean [Covent Garden]
Keats Grove Camden John Keats Writer who lived in the road, and whose house is now a museum. The road was formerly called John Street
Keeley Street – after Robert Keeley, successful actor and comedian of the 19th century [Covent Garden]
Keith Park Road, Uxbridge Street built near the site of the former RAF Uxbridge, and named after an air marshal in the Second World War. Keith Park was leader of No. 11 Group RAF, which was coordinated nearby, in what is now the Battle of Britain Bunker.
Kemble Street – after the Kemble family, who were active in the local theatre community in the 18th and 19th centuries [Covent Garden]
Kendall Place – after William Kendall, local builder and timber merchant in the 18th century [Marylebone]
Kennett Wharf Lane – after its late 18th century owner [City of London]
Kennings Way - unknown; formerly White Hart Row [23]
Kennington Gardens – after the Old English Chenintune (‘settlement of Chenna’a people’); another explanation is that it means place of the King, or town of the King. [Kennington]
Kennington Lane – after the Old English Chenintune (‘settlement of Chenna’a people’); another explanation is that it means place of the King, or town of the King. [Kennington]
Kennington Oval – after the Old English Chenintune (‘settlement of Chenna’a people’); another explanation is that it means place of the King, or town of the King. [Kennington]
Kennington Park Road – after the Old English Chenintune (‘settlement of Chenna’a people’); another explanation is that it means place of the King, or town of the King. [Kennington]
Kennington Road – after the Old English Chenintune (‘settlement of Chenna’a people’); another explanation is that it means place of the King, or town of the King. [Kennington]
Kenrick Place – after William Kenrick, local lecturer and writer in the 18th century [Marylebone]
Kent Passage – after Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Kent Terrace – after Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Kentish Buildings – after 17th century property owner Thomas Kentish; formerly it was Christopher Alley [Southwark]
Kenton Street – after the 18th century vintner Benjamin Kenton, benefactor of the nearby Foundling Hospital [Bloomsbury]
Keppel Row – after Augustus Keppel, 1st Viscount Keppel, 18th century naval figure [Southwark]
Keppel Street – after Elizabeth Keppel, wife of local landowner Francis Russell, Marquess of Tavistock [Bloomsbury]
Keyworth Place – after Leonard James Keyworth, recipient of a Victoria Cross in the First World War [Southwark]
Keyworth Street – after Leonard James Keyworth, recipient of a Victoria Cross in the First World War [Southwark]
Kilmorey Gardens Richmond upon Thames Francis Needham, 2nd Earl of Kilmorey Earl buried with his mistress in the Kilmorey Mausoleum, near the road.
Kilmorey Road Richmond upon Thames Francis Needham, 2nd Earl of Kilmorey Earl buried with his mistress in the Kilmorey Mausoleum, near the road.
King Charles Street – after Charles II reigning monarch when the street was built in 1682 [Westminster]
King Edward Street – named for Edward VI, who turned the adjacent Greyfriars monastery into a hospital; it was formerly known as Stinking Lane [City of London]
King Edward Walk – after Edward VI, who granted land near here to the City of London [Lambeth]
King Edward's Road Barking and Dagenham King Edward VII Originally called Creeksmouth Lane; renamed in 1902 to commemorate the king's coronation.
King George VI Avenue Merton King George VI The avenue was made to commemorate the king's coronation in 1937
King Square – built 1820, and named for George IV [Finsbury]
King Street – built after the Great Fire and named for Charles II [City of London]
King Street – named after Charles I, king when this street was built in the 1600s [St James's]
King Street – named after Charles I, king when this street was built in the 1630s [Covent Garden]
King Street Hammersmith and Fulham John King Bishop of London who gave generously to the poor of Fulham in 1620 [60]
King William Street – named for William IV, reigning monarch when the street was built in 1829-35 [City of London]
King William Street Greenwich King William IV His memorial is in the street near the National Maritime Museum.
King William Walk City of London King William IV. The City example is one of many — merely built in his reign.
King’s Arms Yard – named after a former inn of this name [City of London]
King’s Bench Street – after the King’s Bench Prison formerly located here [Southwark]
King’s Bench Walk – named for the adjacent housing for lawyers of the King’s Bench [City of London]
King’s Cross Bridge – after a former statue of George IV that formerly stood near where the train station is now; the Road was formerly called Bagnigge Wells, after a tea garden of that name near here [Clerkenwell]
King’s Head Yard – after a former inn here of this name [Southwark]
King’s Mews – by association with Theobald's Road, formerly King's Way [Bloomsbury]
King’s Scholars’ Passage – after the King’s Scholars of Westminster School [Westminster]
Kinghorn Street – formerly King Street, renamed in 1885 to avoid confusion with many other streets of this name [City of London]
Kingly Court – originally off ‘King Street’, in honour either of the original owner of this land of Henry III, or James II, reigning monarch when built;
Kingly Street – originally ‘King Street’, in honour either of the original owner of this land of Henry III, or James II, reigning monarch when built; it was renamed in 1906 so as to avoid confusion with other King Streets [Soho]
Kings Cross N1 - The Station at Kings cross took it's name from the statue of George the IV that was at the cross road with Pentonville Road and Grays Inn Road.
Kings Cross Road – after a former statue of George IV that formerly stood near where the train station is now; the Road was formerly called Bagnigge Wells, after a tea garden of that name near here [Clerkenwell]
Kings Road SW1 - Once an old footpath through fields taken over by Charles II, as his own private road leading him to Richmond and Kew Palace.
Kingscote Street – formerly King Edward Street (for Edward VI), renamed in 1885 to avoid confusion with the street of this name off Newgate Street [City of London]
Kingsway – named in honour of Edward VII, reigning king when this road was completed in 1906 [Holborn]
Kingsway Camden / Westminster King Edward VII Opened the street in 1905.
Kinnerton Place North - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Lower Kinnerton, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Kinnerton Place South - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Lower Kinnerton, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Kinnerton Street - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Lower Kinnerton, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Kinnerton Yard - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Lower Kinnerton, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Kirby Street – from Christopher Hatton’s Kirby House in Northamptonshire [Hatton Garden]
Kirkman Place – after local 18th century brewer and property developer Joseph Kirkman [Fitzrovia]
Kneller Road Richmond upon Thames Godfrey Kneller Lived at Kneller Hall in the road, now the Royal Military School of Music, Whitton, Twickenham.
Knightrider Court – thought to be literally a street where knights used to ride [City of London]
Knightrider Street – thought to be literally a street where knights used to ride [City of London]
Kossuth Street Greenwich Lajos Kossuth Hungarian national hero who lived in London in the 1850s.
Ladbroke Crescent Kensington and Chelsea James Weller Ladbroke Developed the North Kensington area around 1840.
Ladbroke Gardens Kensington and Chelsea James Weller Ladbroke Developed the North Kensington area around 1840.
Ladbroke Grove Kensington and Chelsea James Weller Ladbroke Developed the North Kensington area around 1840.
Ladbroke Road Kensington and Chelsea James Weller Ladbroke Developed the North Kensington area around 1840.
Ladbroke Square Kensington and Chelsea James Weller Ladbroke Developed the North Kensington area around 1840.
Ladbroke Terrace Kensington and Chelsea James Weller Ladbroke Developed the North Kensington area around 1840.
Ladbroke Walk Kensington and Chelsea James Weller Ladbroke Developed the North Kensington area around 1840.
Lamb Walk – after a 17th-century inn here of this nam [Southwark]
Lamb’s Buildings – after its early 19th century owner William (or Thomas) Lamb; it was formerly known as Great Swordbearers Alley [Finsbury]
Lamb’s Conduit Passage – after a conduit built by William Lambe in the 16th century to bring clean water from the countryside north of London [Holborn]
Lamb’s Passage – after its early 19th century owner William (or Thomas) Lamb; it was formerly known as Great Swordbearers Alley [Finsbury]
Lambert Jones Mews – after Lambert Jones, Victorian-era councilman [City of London]
Lambeth High Street, Lambeth Road and Lambeth Palace Road – refers to a harbour where lambs were either shipped from or to. It is formed from the Old English 'lamb' and 'hythe'. Lambeth Palace is the official London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury [Lambeth]
Lambeth Hill – corruption of Lambert/Lambart, local property owner [City of London]
Lambeth Road - refers to a harbour where lambs were either shipped from or to. It is formed from the Old English 'lamb' and 'hythe'. [Vauxhall]
Lambeth SE1 - Original name was Lambhythe, Hythe being a Dock where lambs were transported.
Lamb's Conduit Street WC1 - In Henry VIII's time there was a Kentish man named William Lambe who built a faire conduit in Holborn where there was spring water as clear as crystal. The water was carried along in lead pipes from the north fields for more than two thousand yards at his own cost of more than fifteen hundred pounds. The conduit was removed in 1746, but Lamb's name remains at the end of the street were his conduit once stood. Lamb's Conduit Street – named after William Lambe, in recognition of the £1,500 he gave for the rebuilding of the Holborn Conduit in 1564. (According to The London Encyclopaedia, The conduit was an Elizabethan dam made in one of the tributaries of the Fleet River and restored in 1577 by William Lamb, who also provided 120 pails for poor women) [Bloomsbury]
Lancaster Place – former site of the Savoy Palace. It passed into the ownership of the earls of Lancaster in the 13th century, the most famous of which was John of Gaunt, who owned the palace at the times of its destruction in Peasant’s Revolt of 1381 [Strand]
Lancaster Street – unknown; formerly Union Street [Southwark]
Langham Place – after Sir James Langham, who owned a house near here in the early 19th century [Marylebone]
Langham Street – after Sir James Langham, who owned a house near here in the early 19th century [Marylebone]
Langley Court – after Sir Roger Langley, who owned land here in the early 18th century [Covent Garden]
Langley Street – after Sir Roger Langley, who owned land here in the early 18th century [Covent Garden]
Langthorn Court – named after a former property owner of this name [City of London]
Langton Close – after the Arthur Langton Nurses Home formerly located here [Clerkenwell]
Lansbury Gardens Tower Hamlets George Lansbury British politician (MP 1910-1912, 1922-1940) and social reformer who led the Labour Party from 1932 to 1935. Blackwall (ex.-Poplar)
Lansdowne Crescent Kensington and Chelsea Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, 3rd Marquess of Lansdowne Home Secretary and later Chancellor of the Exchequer at the time the road was built.
Lansdowne Rise Kensington and Chelsea Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, 3rd Marquess of Lansdowne Home Secretary and later Chancellor of the Exchequer at the time the road was built.
Lansdowne Road Kensington and Chelsea Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, 3rd Marquess of Lansdowne Home Secretary and later Chancellor of the Exchequer at the time the road was built.
Lansdowne Row – former site of Lansdowne House, home of William Petty, 1st Marquess of Lansdowne in the 18th century [Mayfair]
Lansdowne Terrace – after William Petty, 1st Marquess of Lansdowne, Prime Minister 1782–83 [Bloomsbury]
Lant Street SE1 - Derives its name from the Lant family who inherited the estates known as Southwark Olace which was formerly in the possesion of Heath, Archbishop of York.
Latimer Road, Kensington Edward Latymer Clerk at the Court of Wards and Liveries who bequeathed the land on which Latimer Road was later built to help fund Latymer Upper School, which he founded. The school's playing fields are situated west of the road.
Latymer Road, Edmonton Edward Latymer Clerk at the Court of Wards and Liveries. The roads in Edmonton are located near The Latymer School, founded by Edward Latymer
Latymer Way, Edmonton Edward Latymer Clerk at the Court of Wards and Liveries. The roads in Edmonton are located near The Latymer School, founded by Edward Latymer
Laud Street – after William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury from 1633-45, by association with the nearby Lambeth Palace [Vauxhall]
Laud Street Croydon William Laud Archbishop of Canterbury (1633-1645) who lived at Croydon Palace
Lauderdale Place – named for the Earls of Lauderdale, who owned a house here [City of London]
Launcelot Street – after Launcelot Holland, local developer in the 1820s [Waterloo]
Laurence Pountney Hill and Laurence Pountney Lane – after the former St Laurence Pountney church, built by Sir John de Pulteney but destroyed in the Great Fire [City of London]
Lavington Street – after Thomas Lant, local 18th century developer [Southwark]
Lawn Lane – after a former row of houses here called The Lawn, after their grass plots, demolished in 1889-90 [Vauxhall]
Lawrence Lane – after the nearby St Lawrence Jewry church [City of London]
Laxton Place – after its 1806 developer, the baker George Laxton [Regent’s Park]
Laystall Street – after a former nearby laystall, a term for a refuse heap [Clerkenwell]
Leadenhall Market – after the Leaden Hall, a house owned by Sir Hugh Neville in the 14th century [City of London]
Leadenhall Place – after the Leaden Hall, a house owned by Sir Hugh Neville in the 14th century [City of London]
Leadenhall Street – after the Leaden Hall, a house owned by Sir Hugh Neville in the 14th century [City of London]
Leake Court – after John Leake, founder of a local hospital in 1767 [Waterloo]
Leake Street – after John Leake, founder of a local hospital in 1767 [Waterloo]
Leather Lane – thought to come not from ‘leather’ but from Leofrun, a personal name in Old English; formerly known as Le Vrunelane (13th century), Loverone Lane (14th century) and Liver Lane [Hatton Garden]
Leathermarket Court – after the tanneries and leather market formerly located here [Southwark]
Leathermarket Street – after the tanneries and leather market formerly located here [Southwark]
Lees Place – after either Robert Lee (or Lees), owner of the Two Chairman pub which formerly stood here [107] or one Thomas Barrett of Lee, Kent, 19th century builder [Mayfair]
Leicester Court – Leicester Court was formerly Ryder Court, after local leaseholder Richard Ryder – it was renamed in 1936 [Chinatown]
Leicester Place – the square was home to Leicester House in the 17th century, home of Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester [Chinatown]
Leicester Square Westminster Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester Owner of the land on which the square is built, from 1630; ordered by the Privy Council to allow public access to the square.
Leicester Street – the square was home to Leicester House in the 17th century, home of Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester; [Chinatown]
Leigh Hunt Drive Enfield Leigh Hunt English writer born in Southgate
Leigh Hunt Street – after the author Leigh Hunt, who served a short sentence in a nearby prison [Southwark]
Leigh Place – from the Barons Leigh, who bought land in the area from the Baldwin family in 1689 [Hatton Garden]
Leigh Street – after Leigh in Kent, home county of local 16th century landowner Andrew Judd [Bloomsbury]
Lennox Gardens SW3 - Named after Lord William Lennox.
Leo Yard – from the Latin for lion, as it was formerly Red Lion Yard [Clerkenwell]
Lewisham Street – after William Legge, 1st Earl of Dartmouth, Viscount Lewisham, Lord Privy Seal in the 1710s and local resident [Westminster]
Lexington Street – named in 1885 after the Baron Lexington, whose family – the Suttons – purchased this land in 1645; it was formerly known as Little Windmill Street [Soho]
Lilestone Street – after the former manor of Lilestone which covered this area [Lisson Grove]
Lillie Road Hammersmith and Fulham Sir John Scott Lillie Lillie first laid out the easternmost section of the road across his North End Hermitage estate in 1826.
Lillie Yard Hammersmith and Fulham Sir John Scott Lillie owned the North End Hermitage estate.
Lime Street – Medieval name denoting a place of lime kilns [City of London]
Limeburner Lane – after the lime burning trade formerly located here [City of London]
Lincoln's Inn Fields – after Lincoln’s Inn, the townhouse of the Lacy family, earls of Lincoln, later leased to lawyers in the 14th century [Holborn]
Lind Road Sutton Jenny Lind Swedish singer, who entertained the people of Sutton in 1847 with her singing.
Lisle Street – after Philip, Viscount Lisle, who succeeded to the earldom of Leicester in 1677 [Chinatown]
Lisson Grove and Lisson Street – corruption of Lilestone, the former manor which covered this area, probably after a personal name (i.e. the Saxon Lille) [Lisson Grove]
Litchfield Street – possibly after Edward Lee, 1st Earl of Lichfield, who was brother-in-law of Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton and son of Charles II [78], or Charlotte Lee, Countess of Lichfield, daughter of Charles II [Covent Garden]
Little Albany Street – after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Little Argyll Street – after John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll, owner of the land in the 18th century [Soho]
Little Britain – thought to be after Robert le Bretoun, 13th century local landowner, probably from Brittany [City of London]
Little Chester Street – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Chester [Belgravia]
Little College Lane – after the adjacent St Michael Paternoster Royal, which was created as a collegiate church by Richard Whittington in 1419; College Street was formerly Paternoster Street (meaning rosary makers and College Hill was Royal Street (a corruption of La Réole, France, where local wine merchants hailed from) [City of London]
Little Dean’s Yard – location of the Dean of Westminster’s house [Westminster]
Little Dorrit Court – after the novel Little Dorrit by Charles Dickens, by association with Dickens Square [Southwark]
Little Edward Street - after Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Little Marlborough Street – after John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, 17th – 18th century general [Soho]
Little New Street – built in the mid-1600s, and named simply because it was then new [City of London]
Little Newport Street – after Mountjoy Blount, Earl of Newport (Isle of Wight), who owned a house on this street (then just Newport Street) in the 17th century. Following the construction of Charing Cross Road, Newport Street was split in two and the two sections renamed as they are today [Chinatown]
Little Portland Street – after the Dukes of Portland, who owned much of this land following the marriage of William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland to heiress Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland in 1734 [Marylebone]
Liverpool Street EC2 Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool The street was built in 1829 and named after the former Prime Minister, who had died the previous year. Also home to the Great Eastern Railway and one of London's largest stations.
Livonia Street – thought to be after Livonia (roughly modern Latvia), in allusion to the nearby Poland Street. Prior to 1894 it was called Bentinck Street, from the family name of the Duke of Portland, local landowners [Soho]
Lizard Street – after the Worshipful Company of Ironmongers, who owned this land; their arms incorporates a salamander motif [Finsbury]
Lloyd’s Avenue – as the headquarters of the Lloyd's Register (named for Lloyd's Coffee House) were located here [City of London]
Lloyd’s Row, Lloyd Square, Lloyd Street and Lloyd Baker Street – after the Lloyd Baker family, local 19th century landowners [Clerkenwell]
Lodge Road – as it leads to the Hanover Lodge in Regent’s Park [Lisson Grove]
Lollard Street – named to commemorate the persecution of the Lollards in the 14th century; it was formerly East Street, after a branch of the local landowning Clayton family [Lambeth]
Loman Street – after the former Loman’s Pond located here [Southwark]
Lombard Court – from Lombardy, as this area was home to a community from there; the name was altered from Lombard Street to avoid confusion with the other street of this name [City of London]
Lombard Lane – from Lombardy, as this area was home to a community from there; the name was altered from Lombard Street to avoid confusion with the other street of this name [City of London]
London Bridge Street – after the adjacent London Bridge [Southwark]
London Bridge Walk – after the adjacent London Bridge [Southwark]
London Road – the road that led to London [Lambeth]
London Street – named after local 18th century property owner John London, not the city; the ‘New’ section was a later extension [City of London]
London Wall – after the city wall which formerly ran along this route (though there are still some ruins visible) [City of London]
Long Acre – after the garden/field of the abbey of St Peter; the road was laid out in 1615 [Covent Garden]
Long Yard – simply a descriptive name for this former stable yard [Bloomsbury]
Longmoore Street – after the marshes formerly located here [Victoria]
Lonsdale Road Richmond upon Thames Earls of Lonsdale William Lowther, 2nd Earl of Lonsdale bought the land in 1846, on which the roads were later built
Lord North Street – originally just North Street, as led north from Smith Square, however this was altered in 1936 to commemorate Lord North, Prime Minister 1770-82, so as to avoid confusion with similarly name streets [Westminster]
Lorenzo Street – unknown; formerly York Street [Clerkenwell]
Lorne Close – after the John Campbell, 9th Duke of Argyll (the Marquess of Lorne), husband of Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll, daughter of Queen Victoria [Lisson Grove]
Lothbury – meaning ‘burgh’ of Lotha/Hlothere, a 7th-century name [City of London]
Lots Road SW3 - In 1544 it was recorded as lez lotte when the name discribed the lots of ground which were originally part of the manor over which the parishoners held Lammas rights. Thus bringing the words allotments into present day word.
Lovat Street – thought to be either a corruption of Lucas Lane, after a local landowner, or for Lord Lovat, local politician; it was formerly ‘Love Lane’, probably a euphemism for prostitution, and changed to avoid confusion with the other city lane of this name [City of London]
Love Lane – unknown, but possible with reference to the prostitution that occurred here in the 16th century; it was formerly Roper Lane, probably after the rope making trade, but possibly after a person with this surname [City of London]
Lower Belgrave Street – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), after their home estate of Belgrave, Cheshire [Belgravia]
Lower James Street – after James Axtell, co-owner of the land when Golden Square was developed in the 1670s [Soho]
Lower John Street – after John Emlyn, co-owner of the land when Golden Square was developed in the 1670s [Soho]
Lower Marsh – as this land was formerly a marsh prior to the 19th century [Waterloo]
Lower Robert Street – after Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development with his brother John in the 1760s [Strand]
Lower Sloane Street – after Hans Sloane, local landowner when this area was built up in the 18th century [Belgravia]
Lower Thames Street and Upper Thames Street – thought to mark the bank of the Thames in Roman/Saxon times [City of London]
Lowndes Close – after the Lowndes family, former local landowners [Belgravia]
Lowndes Court – after William Lowndes, 16th-17th century financier and politician, who owned land here [Soho]
Lowndes Place – after the Lowndes family, former local landowners [Belgravia]
Lowndes Square – after the Lowndes family, former local landowners [Belgravia]
Lowndes Street – after the Lowndes family, former local landowners [Belgravia]
Lowther Road Richmond upon Thames Earls of Lonsdale William Lowther, 2nd Earl of Lonsdale bought the land in 1846, on which the roads were later built
Loxham Street – possibly for directors of the East End Dwellings Company who developed these streets in the 1890s [Bloomsbury]
Ludgate Broadway, Ludgate Circus, Ludgate Hill and Ludgate Square – the former city gate of this name that formerly stood here, thought to an Old English term for ‘postern-gate’ [City of London]
Ludgate Circus – the former city gate of this name that formerly stood here, thought to an Old English term for ‘postern-gate’ [City of London]
Ludgate Hill – the former city gate of this name that formerly stood here, thought to an Old English term for ‘postern-gate’ [City of London]
Ludgate Square – the former city gate of this name that formerly stood here, thought to an Old English term for ‘postern-gate’ [City of London]
Lumley Street – after Sibell Lumley, wife of Victor, Earl Grosvenor, local landowner [Mayfair]
Lupus Street – after Hugh Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster, whose family owned much of the surrounding land [Victoria]
Lyall Mews – after Charles Lyall, business partner with local landowners the Lowndes [Belgravia]
Lyall Mews West – after Charles Lyall, business partner with local landowners the Lowndes [Belgravia]
Lyall Street – after Charles Lyall, business partner with local landowners the Lowndes [Belgravia]
Lyndhurst Grove Southwark John Copley, 1st Baron Lyndhurst Lawyer and politician, three times Lord Chancellor of Great Britain.
Lyndhurst Square Southwark John Copley, 1st Baron Lyndhurst Lawyer and politician, three times Lord Chancellor of Great Britain.
Lyndhurst Way Southwark John Copley, 1st Baron Lyndhurst Lawyer and politician, three times Lord Chancellor of Great Britain.
Lyons Place – this land was formerly owned by Harrow School; this street was named for the school’s founder John Lyon [Lisson Grove]


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Some street name derivations – The Underground Map   

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Richard Eades   
Added: 3 May 2021 11:42 GMT   

Downsell Primary School (1955 - 1958)
I was a pupil at Downsell road from I think 1955 age 7 until I left in 1958 age 10 having passed my "11plus" and won a scholarship to Parmiters school in bethnal green. I remember my class teacher was miss Lynn and the deputy head was mrs Kirby.
At the time we had an annual sports day for the whole school in july at drapers field, and trolley buses ran along the high street and there was a turning point for them just above the junction with downsell road.
I used to go swimming at cathall road baths, and also at the bakers arms baths where we had our school swimming galas. I nm y last year, my class was taken on a trip to the tower of london just before the end of term. I would love to hear from any pupils who remember me.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

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Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 08:59 GMT   

Spigurnell Road, N17
I was born and lived in Spigurnell Road no 32 from 1951.My father George lived in Spigurnell Road from 1930’s.When he died in’76 we moved to number 3 until I got married in 1982 and moved to Edmonton.Spigurnell Road was a great place to live.Number 32 was 2 up 2 down toilet out the back council house in those days

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Comment
Lewis   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 20:48 GMT   

Ploy
Allotment

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Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

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Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

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Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

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Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

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NEARBY STREETS
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Ashton Road, E15 Ashton Road is a road in the E15 postcode area
Belton Road, E11 Belton Road is a road in the E11 postcode area
Bond Street, E15 Bond Street is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Brydges Road, E15 Brydges Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Burgess Road, E20 Burgess Road is a road in the E15 postcode area
Buttermere Close, E15 Buttermere Close is a road in the E15 postcode area
Carolina Close, E15 Carolina Close is a road in the E15 postcode area
Celebration Avenue, E20 Celebration Avenue is the southern extension of Temple Mills Lane.
Chandos Road, E15 Chandos Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Cheering Lane, E20 Cheering Lane is a road in the E20 postcode area
Chobham Road, E15 Chobham Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Colegrave Road, E15 Colegrave Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Community Road, E15 Community Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Cranbourne Road, E15 Cranbourne Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Crownfield Road, E11 A street within the E15 postcode
Decapod Street, E15 A street within the E15 postcode
Downsell Road, E15 Downsell Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Drapers Road, E15 Drapers Road is a road in the E15 postcode area
Dunmow Road, E15 Dunmow Road is a road in the E15 postcode area
East Park Walk, E20 East Park Walk runs along the east side of Victory Park.
Elis Way, E20 Elis Way is a road in the E20 postcode area
Ellingham Road, E15 Ellingham Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Etchingham Road, E15 Etchingham Road is a road in the E15 postcode area
Eve Road, E11 Eve Road is a road in the E11 postcode area
Falmouth Street, E15 A street within the E15 postcode
Fortunes Walk, E20 Fortunes Walk is in the East Village area.
Gilbert Street, E15 Gilbert Street is a road in the E15 postcode area
Gordon Road, E15 Gordon Road is a road in the E15 postcode area
Guttmann Square, E20 Guttmann Square is a road in the E20 postcode area
Hall Road, E15 Hall Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Henniker Road, E15 Henniker Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Henniker Road, E15 Henniker Road is a road in the E20 postcode area
Henrietta Street, E15 Henrietta Street is an unofficial name for a side-street of Temple Mills Lane.
High Road Leyton, E15 High Road Leyton is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
High Road Leytonstone, E15 High Road Leytonstone is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
High Road, E15 High Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
High Road, E15 High Road is one of the streets of London in the E11 postal area.
Hughan Road, E15 Hughan Road is a road in the E15 postcode area
Jansen Road, E15 A street within the E15 postcode
Leslie Road, E11 Leslie Road is one of the streets of London in the E11 postal area.
Leyton Road, E15 Leyton Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Leytonstone Road, E15 Leytonstone Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Liberty Bridge Road, E15 Liberty Bridge Road is a location in London.
Liberty Bridge Road, E20 Liberty Bridge Road is a road in the E20 postcode area
Liberty Bridge Road, E20 Liberty Bridge Road is a road in the E15 postcode area
London 2012, E15 London 2012 is a road in the E20 postcode area
Major Road, E15 Major Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Maryland Industrial Estate, E15 A street within the E15 postcode
Maryland Road, E15 Maryland Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Maryland Street, E15 Maryland Street is a road in the E15 postcode area
Medals Way, E20 Medals Way is a road in the E20 postcode area
Medals Way, E20 Medals Way is a road in the E15 postcode area
Millais Road, E15 Millais Road is one of the streets of London in the E11 postal area.
Millais Road, E15 Millais Road is a road in the E15 postcode area
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Morris Road, E15 Morris Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Nutfield Road, E15 Nutfield Road is a road in the E15 postcode area
Oakland Road, E11 A street within the E15 postcode
Oakland Road, E15 Oakland Road is a road in the E10 postcode area
Parkway Crescent, E15 A street within the E15 postcode
Pine Avenue, E15 A street within the E15 postcode
Prize Walk, E20 Prize Walk is a road in the E20 postcode area
Prospect Row, E15 A street within the E20 postcode
Ranelagh Road, E11 Ranelagh Road is one of the streets of London in the E11 postal area.
Snowberry Close, E15 A street within the E15 postcode
Stewart Road, E15 Stewart Road is a road in the E15 postcode area
Sunrise Close, E20 Sunrise Close is a road in the E20 postcode area
Swallowtail House, E20 Swallowtail House is a building in the Olympic Park.
Temple Mills Lane, E15 Temple Mills Lane is a road in the E15 postcode area
Temple Mills Lane, E20 Temple Mills Lane is situated to the north of the London 2012 Olympic Park.
Temple Mills Road, E15 Temple Mills Road is a road in the E20 postcode area
Thorne Close, E11 Thorne Close is one of the streets of London in the E11 postal area.
Thornham Grove, E15 Thornham Grove is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.
Tippler Walk, E15 A street within the E20 postcode
Tom Hood Close, E15 A street within the E15 postcode
Union Close, E10 Union Close is a road in the E11 postcode area
Union Close, E10 Union Close is a road in the E10 postcode area
Vanbrugh Mews, SE3 Vanbrugh Mews is a location in London.
Victoria Road, E10 Victoria Road is one of the streets of London in the E11 postal area.
Victoria Walk, E10 Victoria Walk is a road in the E15 postcode area
Walnut Gardens, E20 Walnut Gardens is a road in the E20 postcode area
Warren Gardens, E15 A street within the E15 postcode
Westdown Road, E15 Westdown Road is a road in the E15 postcode area
Wingfield Road, E15 Wingfield Road is one of the streets of London in the E15 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Leyton House Working Mens Club And Institute This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Leyton Star This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Grange Road, Leyton
TUM image id: 1567936727
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Wallwood Road, E11
TUM image id: 1466548523
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Atherton Road, E7
TUM image id: 1466549155
Licence: CC BY 2.0

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