Southwark Street, SE1

Road in/near Elephant and Castle, existing between 1856 and now

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(51.50572 -0.09995, 51.505 -0.099) 

Southwark Street, SE1

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · * · SE1 ·
MAY
1
2018

Southwark Street is a major street just south of the River Thames. It runs between Blackfriars Road to the west and Borough High Street to the east.

In April 1856, the St Saviour's District Board petitioned the Metropolitan Board of Works to create a new street to run between the South Eastern Railway terminus at London Bridge station and the West End. The street was the first to be made by the Board and was completed in 1864. It was driven across a densely occupied part of the parish and crosses older roads and streets which created oddly shaped plots for redevelopment. Its junction with Borough High Street is so gently curved that the transition between the streets leads to confusion and imprecision as to which is which and the street numbering and lack of a Street Name Plate compounds this, the break between them occurs at the junction with Bedale Street on the north-side but at the south-side the street does not begin until after the 'fork' opposite Stoney Street, some 130 metres to the west. Under the street, a tunnel was constructed with side passages to carry utilities such as gas, water, and drainage pipes, together with telegraph wires for communication. This was an advanced feature for the time.

During the first decade of the street's existence, many large commercial buildings were built along the street. The Hop Exchange, of 1874, is the most notable building at the northern side filling most of the quadrant formed by the street and the railway viaduct. Built in the 1870s, the former Menier Chocolate Factory factory on Southwark Street was converted to an arts complex that incorporates an art gallery, restaurant, and theatre, opening in 2004. In 1932 Borough Market built a formal gateway with administrative offices at Nos 6 and 8. In 1958 the Trustees erected a small office building at the junction with Stoney Street 'St Margaret's House'. At No 110, the western-end of the street, is the headquarters of IPC Media at the 'Blue Fin Building' completed in 2007.

Under the railway bridge carrying trains to Blackfriars Station from the south some urban art work has been placed on the south-side, whilst on the north-side the word 'BANKSIDE' has been placed in very large lettering occupying most of the wall against the pavement.

The building on the south-west corner of the junction with Great Guildford Street is, unusually, numbered 59½.


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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
The Ring The Ring was a boxing stadium which once stood on Blackfriars Road in Southwark.

NEARBY STREETS
America Street, SE1 America Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Anchor Terrace, SE1 The streetscape of Anchor Terrace largely involves small late 18th century residential properties
Applegarth House, SE1 Residential block
Ayres Street, SE1 Ayres Street was formerly known as Whitecross Street.
Bank End, SE1 Bank End is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Bankside way, SE1 Bankside way is a road in the SE19 postcode area
Bankside, SE1 Bankside is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Bear Gardens, SE1 Bear Gardens is the site of a medieval pleasure ground.
Bear Lane, SE1 Bear Lane is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Benbow House, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Benson House, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Black Friars Road, SE1 Black Friars Road is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Blackfriars Bridge, SE1 Blackfriars Bridge is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Blackfriars Road, SE1 Blackfriars Road runs between St George’s Circus at the southern end and Blackfriars Bridge over the River Thames at the northern end, leading to the City of London.
Blue Fin Bldg, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Boundary Row, SE1 Boundary Row is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Bridge Walk, EC4V Bridge Walk is a road in the SE8 postcode area
Brinton Walk, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Burrell Street, SE1 Burrell Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Burrows Mews, SE1 Burrows Mews is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Canvey Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Cardinal Cap Alley, SE1 Cardinal Cap Alley is an alley in Bankside.
Chancel Street, SE1 Chancel Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Chaplin Close, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Clennam Street, SE1 Clennam Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Clink Wharf, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Colombo Street, SE1 Colombo Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Columbo House 50-60, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Cons Street, SE1 Emma Cons was the founder of the Royal Victoria Coffee Music Hall, that later became known as the Old Vic.
Copperfield Street, SE1 Copperfield Street was named after the novel David Copperfield by Charles Dickens, by association with nearby Dickens Square.
Disney Place, SE1 Disney Place is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Dolben Street, SE1 Dolben Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Dorset House 27-45, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Doyce Street, SE1 Doyce Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Emerson Street, SE1 Emerson Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Ewer Street, SE1 Ewer Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Falcon Point Piazza, SE1 Falcon Point Piazza is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Gambia Street, SE1 Gambia Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Gare Apartments, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Gatehouse Square, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Gay Street, SE1 Gay Street is a road in the SW15 postcode area
Grande Vitesse Industrial Centre, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Great Guildford Business Square, SE1 Great Guildford Business Square is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Great Guildford Street, SE1 Great Guildford Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Greet Street, SE1 Greet Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Hatfields, SE1 Hatfields is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Heath Lodge, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Holland Street, SE1 Today’s Holland Street was originally part of a street called Gravel Lane.
Hopton Street, SE1 Hopton Street was known as Green Walk until the late nineteenth century.
Invicta Plaza, SE1 Invicta Plaza is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Isabella Street, SE1 Isabella Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Joan Street, SE1 Joan Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Kings Reach, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Lagare Apartments, SE1 Lagare Apartments is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Lavington Street, SE1 Lavington Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Lockesley Square, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Loman Street, SE1 Loman Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Maiden Lane, SE1 Maiden Lane is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Maidstone Buildings Mews, SE1 Maidstone Buildings Mews is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Marlborough Gardens, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Meymott Street, SE1 Meymott Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Milroy Walk, SE1 Milroy Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Mint Street, SE1 Mint Street, an ancient Southwark street, (now) runs off Marchelsea Road.
Mitre Road, SE1 Mitre Road is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Nelson Square, SE1 Nelson Square is a road in the SE1 postcode area
New Globe Walk, SE1 New Globe Walk is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Nicholson Street, SE1 Nicholson Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
O’Meara Street, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Omeara Street, SE1 Omeara Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Paris Garden, SE1 Paris Garden is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Park Street, SE1 Park Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Peabody Estate, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Peckham High Street, SE1 Peckham High Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Pepper Street, SE1 Pepper Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Perkins Square, SE1 Perkins Square is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Platts Lane, WC1R Platts Lane is a location in London.
Pocock Street, SE1 Pocock Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Pontypool Place, SE1 Pontypool Place is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Porter Street, SE1 Porter Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Price’s Street, SE1 Price’s Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Redcross Way, SE1 Redcross Way was previously called Red Cross Street.
Rennie Street, SE1 Rennie Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Risborough Street, SE1 Risborough Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Robinson Road, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
Rose Alley, SE1 Rose Alley is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Rowland Hill House, SE1 Residential block
Sawyer Street, SE1 Sawyer Street is named after Bob Sawyer, a character in the novel The Pickwick Papers by local resident Charles Dickens.
Scoresby Street, SE1 Scoresby Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Short Street, SE1 Short Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Solomon Way, E1 Solomon Way is a location in London.
Southwalk Street, SE1 Southwalk Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Southwark Bridge Road, SE1 Southwark Bridge Road is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Southwark Bridge, EC4V Southwark Bridge is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Southwark Bridge, SE1 This is a street in the EC4R postcode area
St Alphege House, SE1 Residential block
Sumner Street, SE1 Sumner Street runs from Great Guildford Street to Southwark Bridge Road.
Surrey Row, SE1 Surrey Row is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Surrey Rowe, SE1 Surrey Rowe is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Thames Reach, SE28 Thames Reach is a location in London.
The Blue Fin Building, SE1 A street within the SE1 postcode
The Cut, SE1 The Cut is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
The Terrace, SE1 The Terrace is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Thrale Street, SE1 Thrale Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Trundle Street, SE1 Trundle Street is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Ufford Street, SE1 Ufford Street is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Union Street, SE1 Union Street was so-called as it linked two other streets.
Valentine Place, SE1 Valentine Place is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Zoar Street, SE1 Zoar Street is named after the former Zoar Chapel here, named for the Biblical Zoara.


Elephant and Castle

Elephant and Castle is one of five London tube stations named after a pub.

One thing Elephant and Castle is not named after is 'La Infanta de Castilla', seemingly referring to a series of Spanish princesses such as Eleanor of Castile and María, the daughter of Philip III of Spain. However, Eleanor of Castile was not an infanta - the term only appeared in English about 1600. María has a strong British connection because she was once controversially engaged to Charles I, but she had no connection with Castile. Infanta de Castilla therefore seems to be a conflation of two Iberian royals separated by 300 years.

Regardless, the pub of that name gave its name to the station, and in turn the station to the nearby area - originally called Newington.

Elephant & Castle tube station is on the Bank branch of the Northern Line between Kennington and Borough, and is the southern terminus of the Bakerloo Line.

The station was built in two stages. The Northern Line station opened on 18 December 1890 as part of the first deep-level tube, the City & South London Railway (C&SLR). The Baker Street & Waterloo Railway (BS&WR) station opened on 5 August 1906, five months after the rest of the line. Although belonging to separate companies, the platforms were connected below ground from 10 August 1906.

The first baby to be born on the underground was born at the station in 1924. Press reports claimed that she had been named Thelma Ursula Beatrice Eleanor (so that her initials would have read T.U.B.E.) but this story later proved false, and she was named Marie Cordery. Elephant and Castle seems to specialise in names which prove false!


LOCAL PHOTOS
Postal area SE1
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Hopton Street, Borough, 1977.
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Amen Court, EC4M
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Ayres Street
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Farringdon Street, EC4M
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Hopton’s Almshouses
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In the neighbourhood...

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Hopton’s Almshouses, Hopton Street, Bankside (1957).
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Wagstaff Buildings, Sumner Road, Bankside, c. 1920.
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Hopton Street, Borough, 1977.
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Tate Modern viewed from Thames pleasure boat (2003)
Credit: Christine Matthews
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Ayres Street
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Hopton’s Almshouses
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In 1824, when Charles Dickens was 12 years old, his father, John Dickens, was arrested and sent to Marshalsea Prison for failure to pay a debt. During this time, Charles (the only member of the family not imprisoned) took up residence in the back-attic of a house on Lant Street, a short walk away from the prison. Lant Street was in an area known as "The Mint" which was notorious for its overcrowded conditions.
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The entrance to the Cardinal Cap Alley is under the lamp, left of the yellow door
Credit: Peter Holmes
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Zoar Street (2020)
Credit: The Underground Map
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An open air performance of Charles Dickens’ ’Oliver Twist’ taking place in Mint Street, Southwark on 5 May 1928.
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